WNPR

David DesRoches

Reporter

David covers education and related topics for WNPR, and also teaches journalism and media literacy to high school students.

A central Virginia native, David's reporting interests include the school-to-prison pipeline, disability rights and special education issues, government accountability and transparency, First Amendment matters, and critically exploring the media's relationship to culture and its influence on the public's perception of reality. He's got a bunch of awards in his closet that he can call upon when necessary to remind him that journalism awards should stay in the closet. He, of course, is in journalism for the money, not the accolades. That, of course, is a joke. He’s working on his sense of humor.  

Before journalism, David ran a flyer distribution company, started a non-profit media organization in Ethiopia, and taught songwriting to people with physical and intellectual disabilities. He often contributes to journalism seminars focused on education, investigations and First Amendment issues. When not pestering public officials, David enjoys pestering his friends at craft beer pubs, traveling to unpopular locations, exploring nature and playing music.

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Hartford city officials are criticizing the federal agency that's in charge of immigration enforcement because agents are referring to themselves as "police."

A report released by a children's advocacy group shows that opportunities for young people vary widely between cities and towns across the state. 

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Thousands of Connecticut children have elevated levels of lead in their blood. This is often the result of lead dust in the home or in the soil outside.

mygueart/iStock / Thinkstock

In 2015, taxpayers spent over $230 million on private special education providers. But a state audit of six schools found that one of them wasn’t providing some of the services it was paid to provide.

US Department of Education / Creative Commons


The selection of billionaire Betsy DeVos to head the U.S. Department of Education has ignited a debate over her lack of experience, and whether it could be good or bad. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

An investigation into Hartford Schools by the state's Office of the Child Advocate has found that a former high-ranking school administrator had a history of inappropriate contact with students, yet continued to be promoted through the system.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy has proposed to change how schools are funded. During his budget address to lawmakers in Hartford, Malloy agreed with a recent court decision that Connecticut's education system needs a fix.

Chion Wolf / WNPR


Students across Connecticut are scared and concerned about the immigration policies being pushed by President Donald Trump, according to state education officials. 

David DesRoches / WNPR

A few years ago, Sue Davis was in her son's school when something happened. Her son was forcibly restrained in front of her, she said, and placed in seclusion.

WNPR/David DesRoches


The desks in Sarah Lane’s fifth grade class at Bear Path School are covered with handmade paper hearts with short phrases written on them like, “Help Someone,” and “Compliment a Teacher.” 

Clara Goulding

A pair of eighth graders from a New Haven school want students across the state to forgo eating meat on Mondays. 

David DesRoches / WNPR

Rebecca Cavallo told a story about being in an unhealthy relationship, and Planned Parenthood was there to help her, after she began experiencing side effects because her boyfriend had thrown away her birth control pills.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Over 200 Hartford teachers could be laid off as the school district grapples with declining enrollment and rising costs. 

Kevin/canadapost / Creative Commons

Young children from poor Connecticut homes often struggle with obesity. In fact, according to federal data, the percentage of obese children in New England is higher than any other region in the country.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In Bridgeport, the typical story goes something like this: A superintendent comes in eager to make his or her mark on a failing district. They stay two or three years, then they're gone.

ngkaki/iStock / Thinkstock

State officials announced plans to cut an additional $20 million from public schools to help balance the budget. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Musicians and critics gathered at the WNPR studios recently to talk about the best jazz of 2016 on the Colin McEnroe Show.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The U.S. Secretary of Education said there's a few things the upcoming administration should do to continue the work completed over the last eights years.  

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty said she's been contacted by many people who are concerned about the future of public education under a Donald Trump administration. 

Arasmus Photo / Creative Commons

Carolina Bortolleto came to the U.S. from Brazil when she was nine. She knew she was undocumented, but she didn't realize exactly what that meant until she went to apply for college.

Rosie O'Beirne / Creative Commons

Homelessness among children and youth in Connecticut has increased by over 11 percent since 2012, according to new data by the U.S. Department of Education. And this is happening while adult homelessness is falling.

Gianluca Ramalho Misiti flickr.com/photos/grmisiti / Creative Commons

In September, the 11th U.S . Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that it's OK for employers to tell their employees they can't wear dreadlocks. The case was brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission against a company that rescinded a job offer to an African American woman who refused to cut off her dreads.

WNPR/David DesRoches

Federal and state laws require students to take several standardized tests each year, but critics argue that these so-called high stakes tests aren't a reliable way to see how well students know certain subjects.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut officials are asking a federal court to throw out a lawsuit filed by school choice advocates, who want the state to allow more charter and magnet schools to be built in the state. 

Javon Franklin

A Connecticut native credits the Talcott Mountain Science Center in Avon for helping him become one of the most syndicated puzzle-makers in the world. 

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