WNPR

David DesRoches

Reporter

David covers education and related topics for WNPR, and also teaches journalism and media literacy to high school students.

A central Virginia native, David's reporting interests include the school-to-prison pipeline, disability rights and special education issues, government accountability and transparency, First Amendment matters, and critically exploring the media's relationship to culture and its influence on the public's perception of reality. He's got a bunch of awards in his closet that he can call upon when necessary to remind him that journalism awards should stay in the closet. He, of course, is in journalism for the money, not the accolades. That, of course, is a joke. He’s working on his sense of humor.  

Before journalism, David ran a flyer distribution company, started a non-profit media organization in Ethiopia, and taught songwriting to people with physical and intellectual disabilities. He often contributes to journalism seminars focused on education, investigations and First Amendment issues. When not pestering public officials, David enjoys pestering his friends at craft beer pubs, traveling to unpopular locations, exploring nature and playing music.

Ways to Connect

Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

Eduardo Vasquez came to the U.S. from Mexico when he was two. He has been able to stay and attend college through a federal program started under President Barack Obama. While President Donald Trump has extended these protections, questions remain about how long they will be extended. 

Leo Leung / Creative Commons

Ever since the Presidential election we’ve heard the buzzwords — “echo-chamber,” “facts,” “alternative facts.” More than ever our country is divided by how we get our information and what we see as the “truth.” Even reality itself has become debatable.

David DesRoches/WNPR

Each student took the stage in front of hundreds of their peers at Hill Central High School. And one by one, they revealed their passions, their fears, their hopes and insecurities. And one by one, their words were met with thunderous applause.

creative commons

Groton Public Schools are planning to lay off 70 staff members and close one school as the district grapples with a multi-million-dollar cut from the state. 

David DesRoches / WNPR

Two of the state's largest school systems picked new superintendents recently, leaving only one major city -- New Haven -- without a permanent full-time leader. 

Pages