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Charles Lane

Charles is a radio reporter, story teller, Excel ninja, database grasshopper and loves to FOIL records. He's worked for NPR, Deutche Welle, Radio Netherlands, Soundprint, Penthouse, the Religion News Service and the Catholic World Report. He's won three SPJ Public Service Awards, a National Murrow and was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists. He once did 8Gs in a stunt plane, caught a 10-foot wave (briefly) and dove 40 meters on a single breath. Charles is extraordinarily friendly so don't hesitate to contact.

The Senate approved a measure Wednesday that would roll back policies designed to protect minority car buyers from discriminatory loan terms. Republicans passed the bill by a narrow margin, and it now moves on to the House.

Forty-five states and the Department of Justice are claiming that generic-drug prices are fixed and the alleged collusion may have cost U.S. business and consumers more than $1 billion.

In their complaint, prosecutors say that when pharmacies asked drugmakers for their lowest price, the manufacturers would rig the bidding process.

Spotify, the popular music streaming service, will officially take the company public this spring and is planning a very unconventional IPO — short for "initial public offering" — that has investors talking.

The conglomerate General Electric says it is considering a breakup after taking $6 billion in losses to its insurance division.

For decades, GE gobbled up businesses as diverse as credit cards, jet engines, and TV networks. But last year, the company started losing bets made on coal and oil. Then came losses on power plants. Now it’s insurance. GE’s freshly-minted CEO John Flannery says its long-term care insurance division will lose $6 billion this year and $15 billion in the future.

The tax plan unveiled by Republicans in the House of Representatives will disproportionately raise taxes on those living in Northeast states like New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Many lawmakers from the region, including Republicans, are against the plan.

Property owners started filing insurance claims before the rain even stopped. They wanted to get to the front of what's expected to be a long line of flood claims, according to Joel Moore, an independent insurance adjuster for Gulf Coast Claims in Houston.

"They filed claims before they evacuated," he says. "So they actually have no idea if there's damage or not. They just wanted to be at the front end of the curve."

Ray Dalio, the founder of Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund, is stepping down. Dalio posted a public note that he will no longer lead the Westport, Connecticut-based firm company as of April.

Connecticut's perennial debate over road tolls starts again this month, but this year there is more momentum after a state panel recommended automated tolling.

A federal court has fined a Connecticut investment company $22 million for running a Ponzi scheme. Sharon-based Wilkinson Financial Opportunity Fund bilked 30 investors out of $11 million.

A new law, years in the making, mandates that all public schools in New York State test for lead in their drinking water.

Lead is a neurotoxin that has been linked to learning disorders and lower IQs, especially in children. Back in the 1980s, the federal government tried to regulate the amount of lead in school drinking water but failed.

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Despite protests, presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke at a fundraiser for the Suffolk County Republican party in Patchogue.

The Suffolk County Police Department in New York, one of the largest and highest paid in the country, has been under federal scrutiny for years, and it got worse recently when its chief was arrested.

The Justice Department, under U.S. Attorney Robert Capers, arrested James Burke in December after he allegedly barged into the interrogation of a suspect, Christopher Loeb, in 2012. Burke "is to have alleged to have repeatedly slapped and punched Loeb about the face, head and body while Loeb was in custody and handcuffed," Capers said at a press conference after the arrest.

Stores may be decorated for the holidays, but warmer-than-normal temperatures throughout the U.S. hardly make it feel like it's gift-giving season.

Initial sales reports have been subdued, not exuberant. Some economists say consumers are spreading out their shopping over a longer-than-usual period and that December sales will be fine once the weather turns colder and shoppers run out to use their gift cards.

Retailers are waiting.

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