WNPR

Catie Talarski

Executive Producer

Catie Talarski is Executive Producer at WNPR, focusing on original WNPR programs; working to develop new concepts, live events and content strategies, with concentration on three pillars: Talk Programming, Community Outreach, and Education.

Catie got her start in documentary radio at the Salt Institute in Portland Maine. She has produced several PRNDI award-winning programs on Where We Live, including coverage of young people leaving Connecticut and Sexual Assault on College Campuses. In honoring her award-winning 2010 episode about what makes a good neighbor, PRNDI judges wrote that Where We Live “takes a news story and spins it into universal connections for listeners. This program is an inspiring example of how talk programs can take the ordinary and make it extraordinary.”

Catie’s also documented end-of-life decisions made by young people with Cystic Fibrosis for NPR’s Hearing Voices, and dug into archival tape of artist Romare Bearden for Studio 360. For WNPR, she’s explored the underbelly of Hartford’s Park River, and the history of the women who helped save the Mark Twain House. She worked with the Public Radio Exchange to produce the hour-long specials BULLIED: Teen Stories from Generation PRX and Left Behind, Dropping Out.

Her foray into magazine writing includes an article about her Polish heritage published in SilverKris, the in-flight magazine of Singapore Airlines.

Catie was inspired by Third Coast and others to create live events to build community around radio. She launched *the ear cave* a listening session hosted by a rotating cast of local radio professionals held at a coffeehouse in Hartford. And her Radio Adventure Theater is an experimental variety show that combines live music, theater, poetry and documentary radio. You can follow Catie on Twitter.

Ways to Connect

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Welcome to the Wheelhouse -- WNPR’s Weekly News Roundtable -- as we celebrate our first week as “The Enemy of the American People!” 

It’s true that trust and confidence in the media has faltered over the years, as has confidence in every branch of government. But the “failing” New York Times, as President Trump calls the paper, has actually seen a gigantic surge in its readership.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It's been an interesting week for Connecticut U.S. Senators. President Donald Trump said Richard Blumenthal misrepresented a conversation with Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. In a tweet, Trump called out the Senator for an incident in 2010: "Sen. Richard Blumenthal, who never fought in Vietnam when he said for years he had (major lie)."

Adam Gault/Photodisc / Thinkstock

It's budget day! It's the day Governor Dannel Malloy unveils his budget proposal to the state. And what can we expect? Well, cities and towns may be on the hook for more money going towards teachers' pensions; the elimination of a $200 property tax credit; changes to the Education Cost Sharing formula; a transportation lockbox? 

Beverly & Pack, Creative Commons / Flickr Creative Commons

It's cold, snowy winter times like this that make us question why we choose to live in a place where snow, sleet, and wind define one-third of the year.  It's a great excuse to complain, but does it also make us stronger and better people?

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The theme of the past week may well be "protest." Thousands came out to local airports across the country to protest Donald Trump's immigration executive order. Democrats, including Connecticut's own senator Chris Murphy, are speaking out against Trump's executive orders and cabinet nominations.

C-SPAN

We're halfway through week one of Donald Trump's presidency. So far, we've experienced Sean Spicer's "abnormal" press conference, an executive order to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, separate meetings with the President of Egypt and union leaders, another executive order to advance the approval of oil pipelines, and not one tax return

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

The inauguration is days away. Whether you're excited or not, the transfer of power from Barack Obama to Donald Trump is an historic event.  And an expensive event, at a price tag of more than $200 million. The Department of Homeland Security says they expect 900,000, including many protestors. While past Presidents like Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter, and George W. Bush will be in attendance, more than fifty House Democrats say they will not attend

Pete Souza / White House

Last night night, President Obama delivered his farewell address to the nation. The speech was - let’s say, juxtaposed - with news that intelligence officials have briefed both Obama and President-Elect Donald Trump about reports that Russia had gathered “salacious” and compromising material about Trump. Although, it’s unclear what exactly counts as salacious anymore. 

Mike Grauer Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

  Vin Baker was an Olympic basketball player and four-time NBA All Star. The journey from University of Hartford to professional basketball got him rich quick, but it was a lifestyle he couldn't keep up with.

Baker's struggle with alcoholism is well-documented, as is the fact he blew through $100 million. He lost his home and restaurant.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Wednesday is the start of Connecticut’s legislative session. Lawmakers reconvene, starting squarely at a massive state budget deficit, and a crisis in pension costs that Comptroller Kevin Lembo said will “crush us” unless something is done. 

Criminal Justice Reform: What's At Stake?

Dec 28, 2016
Neil Conway/flickr creative commons

The U.S. locks up more people than any other country in the world, with 2.3 million people behind bars. One-third of the U.S. population has a criminal record. 

jglazer75 / Creative Commons

The electoral college voted, and Donald Trump is still President-elect. But that big news paled in comparison to two terror attacks that posed direct threats to relations between European countries, Russia, Turkey and the conflict in Syria. 

Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

Ben Carson has a new role as head of Housing and Urban Development. Trump took a controversial call with Taiwan. On Twitter, the President-elect threatened companies who plan to move jobs overseas, and criticized the cost of the new Air Force One: "Cancel order!"

In the past week President-elect Donald Trump has tweeted about Cuba, and the recount funded by the Green Party. He tweeted eleven times about Hillary Clinton and voter fraud, including a controversial tweet in which he claimed that "millions of people voted illegally." Trump re-tweeted a 16-year-old who criticized coverage of CNN, and said people who burn the American flag should face consequences - "perhaps loss of citizenship or a year in jail!" 

jennie-o, creative commons

In his recent New Yorker commentary, Jelani Cobb writes about the defiance some states are feeling towards President-elect Trump and his policies. Democratic leaders in California and New York have released statements saying they'll protect their most vulnerable communities. 

Chuck Kennedy / White House

This week, the country is settling into the idea of what a Trump presidency might look like. The President-elect has dialed back his rhetoric on Obamacare and NATO. He's hired a transition team chock-full of family members, political insiders, and most controversially a person criticized from both the right and the left as "the modern face of racism." The new head of the EPA may well be a climate change denier. And he's taken phone calls with world leaders, including Putin

Mara Lavitt / WNPR

Six days to the election and there's certainly a lot to cover. Nationally, the Anthony Weiner investigation has possibly uncovered some more email trouble for Hillary Clinton; and Donald Trump is trying to win over African American voters by promising to be their "greatest champion"

Donald Trump is no longer laughing at Saturday Night Live, which is part of the media and the political establishment that he says have stacked the election against him. At a rally in Pennsylvania, he told his supporters to go to polling places on Election Day to make sure they're "on the up and up" -- which concerned civil rights groups and others citing illegal voter intimidation.  

DonkeyHotey, creative commons

An offensive and sexist conversation between Donald Trump and Hollywood interviewer Billy Bush has been the catalyst for an even deeper rift in the Republican party. House Speaker Paul Ryan has dropped his support for the GOP nominee, saying he'll instead focus on defending the party's majority in Congress

Elipongo / Creative Commons

Listen live on Wednesday at 9:00 am. The first vice presidential debate likely had a much smaller audience and far less excitement than the Trump-Clinton showdown. But this hour, we review some of the highlights. 

Mike Mozart / Creative Commons

The first presidential debate. A former Connecticut governor going back to prison. A special session for Sikorsky. A direct flight to Ireland. An African American history museum. 

Arturo Pardavila III, Flickr Creative Commons

This hour, we mourn the loss of 24-year-old Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez, who died in a boat accident over the weekend. 

City of Hartford

Is the city if Hartford facing Bankruptcy? This hour, we explore that question, and the future of the vacant ballpark. 

wikimedia Commons

Gene Wilder, the iconic actor who starred in "Blazing Saddles," "Young Frankenstein," and "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," died at his home in Stamford, Connecticut on Sunday. He was 83.

Wilder's nephew said he passed away from complications from Alzheimer's disease.

Loren Kerns / Creative Commons

There's lots to talk about in the news right now -- including the presidential election that just keeps giving. Giving stress, giving insults, giving the non-stop news cycle a lot to talk about. 

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