WNPR

Catie Talarski

Executive Producer

Catie Talarski is Executive Producer at WNPR, focusing on original WNPR programs; working to develop new concepts, live events and content strategies, with concentration on three pillars: Talk Programming, Community Outreach, and Education.

Catie got her start in documentary radio at the Salt Institute in Portland Maine. She has produced several PRNDI award-winning programs on Where We Live, including coverage of young people leaving Connecticut and Sexual Assault on College Campuses. In honoring her award-winning 2010 episode about what makes a good neighbor, PRNDI judges wrote that Where We Live “takes a news story and spins it into universal connections for listeners. This program is an inspiring example of how talk programs can take the ordinary and make it extraordinary.”

Catie’s also documented end-of-life decisions made by young people with Cystic Fibrosis for NPR’s Hearing Voices, and dug into archival tape of artist Romare Bearden for Studio 360. For WNPR, she’s explored the underbelly of Hartford’s Park River, and the history of the women who helped save the Mark Twain House. She worked with the Public Radio Exchange to produce the hour-long specials BULLIED: Teen Stories from Generation PRX and Left Behind, Dropping Out.

Her foray into magazine writing includes an article about her Polish heritage published in SilverKris, the in-flight magazine of Singapore Airlines.

Catie was inspired by Third Coast and others to create live events to build community around radio. She launched *the ear cave* a listening session hosted by a rotating cast of local radio professionals held at a coffeehouse in Hartford. And her Radio Adventure Theater is an experimental variety show that combines live music, theater, poetry and documentary radio. You can follow Catie on Twitter.

Ways to Connect

Adam Gault/Photodisc / Thinkstock

On Monday, 22 people died and more than two dozen were injured in a horrific terrorist attack at a concert in Manchester, England. President Trump took time out of his whirlwind international tour to respond to the tragedy. "I call them losers because that's what they are," he said, speaking about the ISIS-claimed attackers. "They are losers and we'll have more of them. But they're losers, just remember that."

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

We started this week with revelations that President Trump -- while meeting with Russian officials in the White House -- spilled classified information from a Middle East ally, which we now know to be Israel. This was seen by Israel watchers as a breach of trust, which could endanger its intelligence personnel and increase a threat from Iran,  a close ally to Russia. 

Tony Webster / Creative Commons

In the last 50 years, Sunday mass attendance in the Archdiocese of Hartford has declined 70 percent, and the number of active priests is down 65 percent. So it’s not a surprise that the Archdiocese is closing down and merging churches across the state -- from 212 to 127. This hour, we talk about the local mergers with priests and parishioners. 

Paul Morigi / Brookings Institution

On Tuesday night, President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey. The reason given? Comey's handling of the Hillary Clinton email scandal. Comey's job was praised by then-candidate Trump, and widely credited with helping to tip the election Trump's way. 

jasastyle/iStock / Thinkstock

The Office of Fiscal Analysis reports that tax revenues are plunging. The state's 100 largest-income tax payers paid 45 percent less this year than last. 

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