WNPR

Catie Talarski

Executive Producer

Catie Talarski is Executive Producer at WNPR, focusing on original WNPR programs; working to develop new concepts, live events and content strategies, with concentration on three pillars: Talk Programming, Community Outreach, and Education.

Catie got her start in documentary radio at the Salt Institute in Portland Maine. She has produced several PRNDI award-winning programs on Where We Live, including coverage of young people leaving Connecticut and Sexual Assault on College Campuses. In honoring her award-winning 2010 episode about what makes a good neighbor, PRNDI judges wrote that Where We Live “takes a news story and spins it into universal connections for listeners. This program is an inspiring example of how talk programs can take the ordinary and make it extraordinary.”

Catie’s also documented end-of-life decisions made by young people with Cystic Fibrosis for NPR’s Hearing Voices, and dug into archival tape of artist Romare Bearden for Studio 360. For WNPR, she’s explored the underbelly of Hartford’s Park River, and the history of the women who helped save the Mark Twain House. She worked with the Public Radio Exchange to produce the hour-long specials BULLIED: Teen Stories from Generation PRX and Left Behind, Dropping Out.

Her foray into magazine writing includes an article about her Polish heritage published in SilverKris, the in-flight magazine of Singapore Airlines.

Catie was inspired by Third Coast and others to create live events to build community around radio. She launched *the ear cave* a listening session hosted by a rotating cast of local radio professionals held at a coffeehouse in Hartford. And her Radio Adventure Theater is an experimental variety show that combines live music, theater, poetry and documentary radio. You can follow Catie on Twitter.

Ways to Connect

Michael Gil / Wikimedia Commons

The nation is waking up to another devastating tragedy—this time, a school shooting in a Florida high school. Police say 17 are dead, more than a dozen others have been hospitalized. The shooter, a former student, is in custody.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Much of state lawmakers’ budget-crafting in recent years has focused on cutting spending. Any proposals to raise revenue through new or expanded taxes are almost instantly decried as anti-business in a state increasingly hurting for business. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

At noon on Wednesday, Governor Dannel Malloy is delivering his final budget address to the Connecticut General Assembly. He’s already leaked a large part of what he would like to do: cut state aid to certain rich towns, lend a hand to Connecticut taxpayers hurt by the federal tax changes, and make it more expensive to drive on state highways, so we can afford to fix them. 

Ninian Reid / Creative Commons

This hour, we provide analysis of President Trump's State of the Union address. Much of the speech was aimed at bridging a divide between disgruntled hardliners now unsure about Trump’s seriousness on immigration, and more traditional Republicans, hoping to draft off a rising stock market and their tax cut win.

Mara Lavitt / WNPR

This week, Governor Dannel Malloy called for a ban on "bump stocks" -- devices that can make semi-automatic weapons fire like machine guns. Pfizer announced plans to end research into treatments for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases -- and they announced several hundred layoffs including at their facility in Groton. 

Beverly & Pack / Creative Commons

It's cold, snowy winter times like this that make us question why we choose to live in a place where snow, sleet, and wind define one-third of the year.  It's a great excuse to complain, but does it also make us stronger and better people?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The race for governor of Connecticut just got a lot more interesting. Joe Ganim, former inmate, current mayor of Bridgeport, unable to qualify for state financing, has announced that he’s in the race -- and establishment Democrats are worried about him getting into a primary.

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

The state budget stalemate that goes on for months, and results in a budget that isn’t balanced. An unpopular governor tangles with a newly divided legislature over control of spending -- and not surprisingly, many big names ask, “do I really want that job?” 

Cali4beach / Creative Commons

Last night saw the unlikeliest of upsets in Alabama. Democrat Doug Jones, propelled by a big turnout from the state's urban and suburban voters, very narrowly defeated Republican Roy Moore in a special election that could have big consequences in Washington - and even in Connecticut. 

Leave out for a minute any analysis of what this means as a referendum on Trumpian politics, or the race for congress in 2018, this win by Jones could mean that Republicans’ tax bill is in jeopardy. 

ccPixs.com, Flickr creative commons

In a move that signals a shift in the health care market, CVS/Health announced a $69 billion deal to buy Aetna - the third largest insurer in the nation. This would be one of the biggest health care deals of all time, and would leave Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini with a sweet $500 million payout.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen announced this week that he will not be seeking a third term. This leaves two huge holes to fill - AG and Governor - with no clear front-runners.

Olin Gilbert, creative commons

Allegations against Alabama Republican Roy Moore -- who is accused of sexual misconduct with minors -- don't seem to be stopping his bid for the U.S. Senate. On Tuesday, President Trump openly endorsed him, saying we should believe Moore because "he said it didn't happen." 

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Attorney General - and former Senator - Jeff Sessions has spent more time on Capitol Hill than he’d like over the last few months, again facing tough questioning about what he did and didn’t know about contacts between Russia and the Trump campaign he was a part of. 

Vox Efx / Creative Commons

This hour, we review the results of local elections across the state, and look at races across the country -- many of which were swept by democrats, including formerly republican gubernatorial seats in Virginia and New Jersey. Some are saying that's a blow to President Trump

ABC News

Two famous Connecticut families have their names enshrined on buildings and roads. Both are back in the news for different reasons this week. 

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