Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

One day after Bryton Mellott's photo of himself burning an American flag led to his arrest in Urbana, Ill., the local prosecutor says no charges will be filed against Mellott. The 22-year-old was released Monday, after questions arose over Illinois' flag desecration law.

Enacted in 2013, that law was the basis for Mellott's arrest. But the state's attorney says it contradicts the Supreme Court's ruling on this issue.

Nearly four years after laying off thousands of workers and announcing that it was going out of business — and three years after Twinkies returned to store shelves — Hostess Brands LLC, the maker of Twinkies and Ding Dongs, is preparing to take its stock public.

The plan is emerging after big changes at Hostess: its business is smaller and leaner; it has far fewer employees; and those employees are no longer represented by a union.

After being called out for editing its live broadcast of the fireworks in Washington, D.C., to show fireworks bursting in clear air — on a night in which the weather was dominated by fog, low clouds and misting rain — PBS called it "the patriotic thing to do."

From west to east, the targets ranged from a U.S. consulate in Jeddah to the holy city of Medina and a mosque in the city of Qatif. So far, at least, the casualties are relatively light when compared to recent similar attacks. In at least one case, the attacker died before reaching their target.

Information about the attacks is still emerging, and some early reports may prove off-base. We'll move quickly to correct the record and we'll only point to the best information we have at the time. Refresh this page for the latest.

The question of where one of the NBA's biggest stars will play next season is now over: Kevin Durant is leaving the Oklahoma City Thunder to join a fellow superstar in Stephen Curry, whose Golden State Warriors narrowly missed out on repeating as NBA champions last month.

In May, Durant and the Thunder had pushed Curry and the Warriors to a Game 7 of their Western Conference playoff before the Oklahoma squad was eliminated from contention.

Updated 1:40 a.m. ET with Juno orbit maneuver

After a nearly five-year journey, NASA's solar-powered Juno spacecraft achieved orbit around Jupiter on Monday night. Juno navigated a tricky maneuver — including slowing by around 1,212 mph — to insert itself into orbit in what NASA calls "the king of our solar system."

At 11:18 p.m. ET, Juno transmitted a radio signal to Earth that meant its main engine had switched on. It stayed on for 35 minutes, placing Juno into exactly the orbit that mission managers had planned for.

The death toll from Sunday's bombing of a crowded street in central Baghdad has risen to at least 151, and Iraqis have responded angrily, blaming politicians and security agencies for not securing their capital. Iraq's leader got a hostile reception when he visited the area.

A Chinese court has sentenced a powerful former adviser to life in prison, in one of the highest-level cases in the country's anti-corruption campaign. Ling Jihua, who had been a close aide to former President Hu Jintao, will not appeal the ruling, according to state media.

From Beijing, NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports:

"A court in the northern port city of Tianjin found Ling Jihua guilty of taking millions of dollars in bribes, obtaining classified information and abusing his office.

Gov. Jerry Brown has signed new gun control legislation for California, enacting bills that limit magazine capacity to 10 bullets; require a background check for those purchasing ammunition; and restrict the lending of firearms, among other effects.

In signing the bills, Brown said he wants "to enhance public safety by tightening our existing laws in a responsible and focused manner, while protecting the rights of law-abiding gun owners."

Since 2009, the U.S. has carried out hundreds of airstrikes in countries other than Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, the White House says, providing new details to the often secretive strikes — many of which were carried out via unpiloted drone aircraft.

The administration released these figures for the period from Jan. 20, 2009, to Dec. 31, 2015:

  • 473 airstrikes carried out outside of "areas of active hostilities"
  • Combatants: between 2,372 and 2,581 deaths
  • Non-combatants: between 64 and 116 deaths

Months after he was granted a new hearing because of new evidence, Adnan Syed, whose 2000 murder conviction was a key focus of the hit podcast Serial, has been granted a new trial, according to his attorneys.

Baltimore City Circuit Judge Martin Welch vacated Syed's conviction, saying in a memorandum that his attorney "fell below the standard of reasonable professional judgment" in handling his case.

Announcing the news Thursday, attorney Justin Brown tweeted in all-caps: "WE WON A NEW TRIAL FOR ADNAN SYED!!!"

The windfall must have seemed heaven-sent. How else to explain a young man who had fled Syria's violence and reached Germany — where he realized the donated wardrobe he'd been given contained 50,000 euros (around $55,000) in cash?

But instead of keeping it, the man contacted the immigration office to ask about turning the money in. And so, eight months after he entered Germany as a refugee from Homs, Syria, the man is being praised as a hero by local police for his honesty.

At least 32 people have died at Istanbul's Ataturk International Airport, where an explosion followed an outburst of gunfire Tuesday night, according to Turkish media. Police and emergency personnel have flocked to the airport. More than 80 people were reportedly injured.

Crucial details about the attack are still emerging: We'll update this post with news from Istanbul as it emerges.

Thermal cameras and other tools that can detect "mechanical doping" — small but powerful motors that boost riders' power levels — will be used in this year's Tour de France, in a change race officials announced just days before the prestigious race's start on July 2.

The president of a regional bank in China has been suspended after a video was circulated in which an official at a special training session went down a row of eight employees to deliver a hard spanking as punishment for poor performance. A second executive has also reportedly been suspended.

An umbrella meeting of some of the most powerful people in international sports has "unanimously agreed" to respect the decision by track and field's governing body to ban Russia's track and field athletes from the upcoming Summer Olympics — but it also left open the possibility that some of those athletes could be cleared to compete in Rio.

Hours after releasing a partial transcript of Orlando gunman Omar Mateen's 911 phone call with police during the deadly shooting that left 49 victims dead, the FBI has released a new version of the record — one that includes Mateen's pledge of allegiance to ISIS.

The Justice Department's decision to redact references to ISIS and its leader from the transcript took many observers by surprise, particularly as many media outlets, including NPR, have reported that Mateen had pledged his support for ISIS and its leader during phone calls with police.

During his three-hour attack on an Orlando nightclub, gunman Omar Mateen spoke to police negotiators for nearly 30 minutes, according to partial transcripts that the FBI released Monday. But his victims — people trapped in the club — were also on their phones, detailing the situation for police.

Toward the end of the standoff, survivors of the attack also told police "the shooter said he was going to put four vests with bombs on victims within 15 minutes," the FBI says.

A solar-powered airplane took off from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport early Monday, in a bid to have the Solar Impulse 2 craft cross the Atlantic Ocean and land in Spain on Thursday.

Updated at 8:55 p.m. ET.

He called it yapping, loose talk, and sloppiness. President Obama dismissed criticism of his administration's avoidance of the term "radical Islam" and urged America to live up to its founding values Tuesday, speaking at length about inclusiveness and religious freedom.

Two French police officers — a couple who lived in a suburb of Paris with their 3-year-old — died Monday night in an attack after which their assailant broadcast a live video from their home via Facebook, according to media reports in France. A police raid killed the attacker; the young boy survived.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports for our Newscast unit:

"The attack took place on two off-duty officers at their home about 30 miles west of Paris. The attacker surprised the male police officer at his home as he arrived from work, stabbing him repeatedly.

Citing "strong indications of radicalization by this killer" in Sunday's mass shooting at the Pulse Orlando nightclub in Orlando, Fla., FBI Director James Comey said there are conflicting signs about the gunman's motivations — and no sign that he was acting under orders.

It was Peru's first win over Brazil in 30 years — but the play that sealed the 1-0 upset is being criticized and debated, as the goal seemingly relied on a Peruvian player using his arm to deflect the ball past Brazil's goalkeeper.

The controversial goal came from Raul Ruidiaz, on what Fox Sports calls "a pretty blatant handball." See the video yourself:

Microsoft is making a massive bet on professional social networking: It has reached an agreement to buy LinkedIn for $26.2 billion. The deal is the biggest ever for Microsoft and one of the largest for the tech industry.

What this represents is effectively a bet on a new kind of connected workplace, in what Microsoft calls the "productivity" industry. The companies hope to merge Microsoft's Office 365 and other business products with LinkedIn's professional social network.

A hometown hero is being laid to rest in Louisville, Ky., as Muhammad Ali, the boxer and humanitarian, is buried Friday. Fans came to the city from far and wide to pay their respects as Ali's body passed by on its way to a private burial.

Gawker Media, the gossip and news company that lost a high-profile court case in which it was ordered to pay $140 million over a violation of Hulk Hogan's privacy, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from its creditors.

In addition to its eponymous website, Gawker operates several other popular sites, including Deadspin, Jezebel and Gizmodo. But reports out Friday also said Gawker's founder, Nick Denton, was trying to find a buyer for the company.

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET: Gawker Confirms Ziff Davis Deal

A wildlife hospital in Britain had no trouble spotting — or smelling — this patient. After all, the sea gull had doused itself in a vat of chicken tikka masala. After an exam, two findings emerged: The bird would be fine, and "boy did he smell good!"

The Mars candy company brought M&M's to Sweden in 2009. But the country already had a famous chocolate candy marked with an M — and now a court says M&M's should melt from the market, owing to a trademark infringement.

The case pitted Mars against Mondelez International, which uses its Marabou label to sell M-marked chocolates that it calls Sweden's "all-time favorite."

There's no evidence that Aubrey McClendon, the oil industry veteran who died one day after being charged with antitrust conspiracy, meant to kill himself when his car hit a wall at high speed in March, police say.

"Our investigators found no information which would compel us to believe this was anything other than a vehicular accident," Oklahoma City Police Department spokesman Capt. Paco Balderrama tells NPR. He also said that the final report will not be released to the public.

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