Betsy Kaplan

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

The Nose: Bieber's Bust, Casting Peter Pan, and Scapegoating Maureen McDonnell

Theresa Cramer - Editor, Writer.
Chion Wolf WNPR

It was a fertile week for topics, but here at The Nose, we've boiled them down to four.

First, the decision by NBC to capitalize on its live Sound of Music ratings hit with a revival of the live TV Peter Pan. No cast has been announced yet, so that allows us to do some "dreamcasting. "

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:00 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Talking About HIV/AIDS in 2014

AIDS medications that Karina Danvers takes.
Chion Wolf WNPR

"Dallas Buyer's Club" covers a lot of the same ground as an Oscar-nominated documentary about AIDS from last year, "How To Survive A Plague." Each film covers the time from mid-to-late 1980s when the disease struck, when there was no accepted or effective medical treatment, when the patients themselves had to push for better research and faster tracks to bring drugs to market.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:00 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Asteroid Apocalypse: How Likely Is It?

Artist's view ofa watery asteroid in white dwarf star system GD 61.
Credit Hubble Space Telescope / Creative Commons

Scientists say that the asteroid that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia this past February was a rare event, unlikely to happen more than every 100 -200 years. But a recent paper in the scientific journal Nature said the earth should expect and plan to get hit by Chelyabinsk-sized asteroids more often-- maybe every decade or two.

This news sparked a flurry of talk about what that means for us on earth. How vulnerable are we and are we doing enough to detect and deflect asteroids?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:10 am
Tue January 21, 2014

The Scramble Is on the Scrimmage Line

The Miniature Football Coaches Association is comprised of hobbyists and collectors passionate about electric football
Credit Stefano Tinti/iStock / Thinkstock

Through no act of overarching planning, all three of our segments today will deal directly, or otherwise, with sports.

In our first segment, we talk with Linda Holmes from the NPR culture blog, Monkey See. We also delve into the controversy over a recent New York Times column by former executive editor, Bill Keller

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:01 am
Fri January 17, 2014

The Nose Falls in Love With Its Operating System

James Hanley is the co-founder of Cinestudio at Trinity College.
Chion Wolf WNPR

The Nose panel went to the movies this week to see the critically-acclaimed Spike Jonze film, "Her," about a future world in which it's not unusual for a man to fall in love with his artificially-intelligent operating system. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:00 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

The Complications of Comedy

Didi Conn and Burke Moses
Chion Wolf

Dying is easy, comedy is hard. But, why is comedy so hard, especially on the stage, and what makes something funny?

The premise for a famously funny plot could easily sound like a tragedy.  An out of work actor is so desperate for employment that he dresses up like a woman and then falls in love with a beautiful co-star whom he deceives and betrays on several levels. That doesn't sound that hilarious. 

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Party Politics
10:16 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Listeners React to Colin's Republican Roundtable

Credit DonkeyHotey / Creative Commons

Listeners weighed in during our panel discussion with four prominent state Republicans on The Colin McEnroe Show.

As it turns out, few state Republican parties adopt an official state party platform, instead choosing to follow a mission that conforms the national platform to the perceived needs of each individual state. 

In Connecticut, divisive social issues, such as reproductive rights and faith, take a back seat to fiscal issues that unite most Republicans around job growth, lower taxes, less regulation, and smaller government. But finding consensus has a steep price in blue states like Connecticut.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:05 am
Tue January 14, 2014

What's It Like To Be Republican in Connecticut?

Jerry Labriola Jr. is the Connecticut Republican State Party Chairman
Chion Wolf

When I first started writing about politics in Connecticut, I can honestly say that there were many more Republicans who excited my admiration than there were Democrats. It was 1979, the wave of interesting new progressive Democrats was coming, including that Bill Curry guy you hear so much about, but the entrenched Democratic leadership was anything but progressive. It was calcified, blinkered, and in too many cases, dirty. They'd had too much power for too long. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:31 am
Mon January 13, 2014

The Scramble Catches Up with Gene Demby and Roger Catlin

The 71st annual Golden Globe Awards
Credit someone 10X

Today is Monday. That's when we do the show on the fly. We call it The Scramble and one of the twists we're trying is the reverse of ordinary public radio guest booking. Usually, we start with a topic and try to find the best possible guests. But, for one segment of The Scramble each week, we pick a guest we want to talk to and then ask him or her what the topic should be. The idea is to pick an interesting person and then find out what's on that person's mind right now. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:19 am
Fri January 10, 2014

The Nose is Stuck in Traffic

Theresa Cramer is editor of The Cut Magazine
Chion Wolf WNPR

Governor Chris Christie's administration is under fire for ordering  lane closures  that blocked access to the George Washington Bridge for four days last September, indulging in an egomaniacal fantasy of vengeance against a political foe who refused to recognize the Christie administration's self-professed superiority.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:29 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Remembering the Collapse of the Hartford Civic Center Roof

The collapse of the Hartford Civic Center roof in January 1978.
Credit CPTV

For many years, Ralph Nader has pushed the idea of an American Museum of Tort History which would be located somewhere in Connecticut, probably Winsted. The exhibits would concern tort cases from all over the U.S. but you have to think the Hartford Civic Center roof collapse would merit a special diorama.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:49 am
Mon January 6, 2014

The Scramble: Insider Trading, Anxiety, and David Brooks Best Friend

The trading floor of The New York Stock Exchange
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Today on The Scramble we lead off with some reporting that will be featured this week on a PBS' "Frontline" story, To Catch a Trader. It's the story of a federal probe into insider trading and the specific role of Connecticut's Steve Cohen, and his SAC hedge fund. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:13 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Enjoying the Randomness of Miscellanea

The joy of miscellanea!
Credit Evelyn Giggles on Flickr Creative Commons

Wandering the vast labyrinth of useless information, you might encounter some people having a debate about the last person who knew everything. This is a great, and also pretty hopeless debate, because it requires a judgment about what all the useful information in the world might have been and who was capable of knowing it. 

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Where We Live
12:00 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

Coming Together Across the Ages

Intergenerational relationships can be equally beneficial for the younger person.
Credit Alexey Klementiev/iStock / Thinkstock

When Americans get older, two things often happen. Some are forced into a life where everyone around them is the same age, in an assisted living community when they become reliant on others for their care.

Others choose this life, retiring to the south, in a community of active seniors with no kids allowed. But what’s the impact of this kind of social isolation from those of other ages?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:33 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

The Final Report on Sandy Hook

Books found in the Lanza home, from the Connecticut State Police report.
Credit State of Connecticut

There are a lot of people who, for understandable reasons, would like the story of the Sandy Hook shootings to fade away. But, of course it never will. It's part of our molecular structure, especially here in Connecticut. 

This hour, we touch on some of the questions answered  by the release of the state's so called final report on the murders. We also talk about some of the questions that haven't been answered and the peculiar, to some of us, reluctance by the state to release this report. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:40 am
Fri December 27, 2013

The Nose Gets Inside Llewyn Davis

James Hanley is the co-founder of Cinestudio at Trinity College
Chion Wolf

The Nose panelists explore the hidden mysteries of the Coen Brothers' new film, Inside Llewyn Davis, based  on the early folk movement of 1960's Greenwich Village and one of its early pioneers, Dave Van Ronk. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:34 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Scrambling Toward Christmas With Sad Songs, Oscar Isaac, and Tight Flights

Oscar Isaac plays Llewyn Davis in the Coen Brother's new film, "Inside Llewyn Davis."
Credit Mongrel Media Press Photos

A couple of weeks ago, we did a whole show about blood pressure only to have an article in The Journal of the American Medical Association blow a lot of the current thinking about blood pressure right out of the water. We talk to UConn's hypertension expert, Dr. Billy White, about new guidelines saying people over 60 may not need to keep their blood pressure as low as previously thought. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:07 am
Fri December 20, 2013

The Nose Blows for Duck Dynasty, Netflix Adultery, and More

Jim Chapdelaine.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Here are the topics for The Nose today -- and this week we had to throw out a lot of perfectly good ones because there were so many:

We pretty much have to tackle the controversy around Duck Dynasty. One of the real life characters in the reality TV show gave an interview in which he aired his strong religious views, which included multiple denunciations of homosexuality as a sin.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:28 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Daniel Menaker's Journey Through the Hallowed Halls of The New Yorker

Daniel Menaker.
Credit Daniel Menaker

If you read magazines and live on the North half of the East Coast there is a good chance that you believe that The New Yorker is the ne plus ultra of magazine writing and if you believe that there's a good chance you run around using phrases like ne plus ultra.

With The New Yorker's Olympian status goes a certain preciousness One of the reasons there's nothing else quite like The New Yorker is The New Yorker deeply believes that to be true and communicates it to us in subtle ways. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:41 am
Tue December 17, 2013

How Do We Determine the Value of Art?

A Jeff Koons red balloon flower
Credit Wikimedia Commons

A Francis Bacon triptych, "Three Studies of Lucian Freud" sells for $142.4 million.

Jeff Koons work sells for $58.4 million, making it the most expensive art by a living artist to sell at auction.

Is any art really worth this much or do a few wealthy investors artificially drive up the market to divert the rest of us from the reality of overall declining sales. If art is not worth as much as certain vested interests want us to believe, how do we determine the real worth of art?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:38 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Monday Scramble: Peter O'Toole, Jameis Wilson, and Joan Fontaine

Peter O'Toole in "Lawrence of Arabia"
Credit LAPhotographer on Flickr Creative Commons

This is the Monday Scramble, the show we assemble on very short notice to challenge ourselves and keep things fresh.

Two film icons died over the weekend, Peter O'Toole and Joan Fontaine. Attention gravitated to O'Toole because of his larger than life roles and his larger than life off-screen behavior. We'll be talking about O'Toole with one of his co-stars and with a director but we didn't want to ignore Fontaine, famous for her Oscar-winning role and for her decades-long feud with her sister, Olivia DeHaviland. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:56 am
Fri December 13, 2013

The Nose Sniffs Out the Controversy Surrounding Housework, Smarm, and More

Irene Papoulis is a lecturer in Writing and Rhetoric at Trinity College
Chion Wolf

After a two-week hiatus, The Nose, our weekly cultural panel, is back on with discussions of a controversial New York Times essay about who does housework, a contemplation of smarm versus snark, a nod to all the messiness around Nelson Mandela's funeral, and some second-guessing of Time's Person of the Year, Pope Francis or Ed Snowden.

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Medical Marijuana
1:23 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

Students Are Developing a Test to Detect Contaminants in Medical Marijuana

Students Renae Labonte and Jinyun Guat.
University of New Haven

Students at the University of New Haven are developing a DNA test that could detect contaminants in medical marijuana. Dr. Heather Coyle, a forensic botanist and associate professor at UNH, said patients using pot for medicinal purposes could be harmed by contaminants that they can't see.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:23 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Singing Away the Blues

Lucy Ferriss is a writer-in-residence at Trinity College and author of several books, including the forthcoming, The Map of Honor. She also sings with CitySingers choir.
Chion Wolf

I suppose you could say that today's show is about a fairly obvious truth--singing with other people feels good. 

But, it's a little bit more complicated than that. When you go to a church and pick up a hymnal and sing what everybody else sings, it feels okay. And, a fairly complex set of activities takes place in your brain, and that's nice, but it pales in comparison to really singing with others. 

That is, getting together with other people and rehearsing and working toward a truly successful blend of voices.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:44 pm
Tue December 10, 2013

Tuesday Tumble: Eddie Perez, "Rent" in Trumbull, Snowy Owls and the Ivory Trade

Steven Seligman is an attorney in Hartford
Chion Wolf

The Connecticut town of Trumbull, and especially its thespian society, has become a familiar name in the theater world, but maybe for the wrong reasons. When the high school principal decided to cancel the thespian society's production of "Rent," the story went national. It has bubbled along for weeks and as of today, we may have news about a compromise that would allow it to be staged.

Meanwhile, former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez has been awarded not one, but two new trials. We'll have an expert here to explain how that's likely to play out. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:37 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Bringing Back Boy Bands: Did They Ever Really Leave?

The Monkees made music that drove their fans wild between 1966 and 1970. They continued to make music individually and in reunion with one another for many more decades.
Credit Nico7Martin on Flickr Creative Commons

The Monkees were the first group to exhibit all or most of the qualities we now associate with the term "boy band." They were assembled through auditions. They had a set of visual styles imposed on them. They were incredibly popular with tween-aged girls. They were plagued by the accusation that there was less to them than meets the eye. That last accusation was false, by the way.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:47 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Preserving the Moon and Protecting Its Rocks

Astronaut Eugene Cernan salutes deployed U.S. flag on the lunar surface
Credit NASA Goddard Center on Flickr Creative Commons

Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, but the first man to urinate there was Buzz Aldrin, just a little ahead of Neil. The two astronauts relieved themselves into bags within their suits, then removed those bags and left them on the lunar surface. When you gotta go, you gotta go. It was time to go. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:01 am
Wed December 4, 2013

Blood Pressure is One Measure of Future Cardiovascular Disease

Dr. Paul Thompson, Chief of Cardiology at Hartford Hospital
Chion Wolf

Long before we knew how the cardiovascular worked, ancient doctors may have recognized what we call hypertension. It seemed like maybe there was too much blood, so they treated it with leeches. 

Even today, high blood pressure is a little bit mysterious. The way it's typically measured may be the wrong way. And, it's not caused by one single factor so no single drug treats all the things that cause high blood pressure. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:50 am
Mon December 2, 2013

The Scramble: Metro-North, the "Globalization of Indifference," and Kurt Weill

Kurt Weill is a German composer who emigrated to the United States in 1935, at the age of 35, to escape persecution in Nazi-led Germany. He is considered one of the most important composers of the 20th century.
Credit Kevin Dooley / Creative Commons

Metro-North has had a tough year. Yesterday's derailment in the Bronx follows the May derailment in Bridgeport that injured more than 70 people, the death of a rail worker repairing tracks in West Haven one week later, the July derailment of a freight train that occurred about 1,700 feet from Sunday's derailment, and a nearly two-week power outage in September that severely disrupted rail traffic.

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Where We Live
3:00 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

Organ Donation: Providing Life After Death

Caitlyn Bernabucci, LifeChoice Donor Services
Chion Wolf WNPR

Every day, around 80 people receive organ transplants in the U.S. But an average of 18 people die daily due to a shortage of much-needed organs, like kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs, even corneas.

One body donor can impact the lives of more than 50 people.

This hour, a conversation on organ donation and transplantation. Do you have personal experience with organ donation? Are you a donor or recipient? Why did you choose to be a donor? 

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