Connecticut Department of Public Health

The state department of public health has launched an initiative to promote better food choices and a more physically active lifestyle for pre-schoolers.

In the new campaign children are introduced to a cartoon cow and her son, a rabbit and a super strong chimp with a simple message: "Fruits and veggies give you the energy to play hard. And low-fat dairy helps you grow strong. Eat healthy, play hard."

That's just one of the public service announcements running on CPTV and other cable TV channels state wide as part of the Action Pack campaign.

A bill that would prohibit insurers from charging patients for colonoscopies that end up as surgical procedures passed the legislature. As WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, it now awaits the governor's approval.

Not long ago, we told you about an oddity in health insurance. It went like this. Under the nation's new health care law, called the Affordable Care Act, most preventative screenings should come at no additional cost to patients. But what happens when a screening turns into a treatment? Here's what happens.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Sanofi Pasteur

Connecticut requires almost a dozen immunizations by the time a child enters school.  As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports there's a temporary shortage of one particular vaccine.

The vaccine is called Pentacel and it's a combination vaccine that protects children from several different diseases.

Diptheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio and Meningitis. Four doses are required before a child turns nineteen months old.

But if your child is due for his or her next dose of Pentacel, it may not be available.

Chion Wolf

As the business of health care continues to boom, the drumbeat against so-called "conflicts of interest" in medicine has gotten louder.

A national debate’s been cooking about the close relationship between money and medicine. How is that relationship affecting patient care? Can doctors make the right decisions when they’re inundated with sales representatives from pharmaceutical and medical device companies?

Dr. Suzanne Campbell

Fairfield University is participating in the nationwide initiative, Joining Forces, to to help veterans. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with the Dean of the School Of Nursing, Dr Suzanne Campbell.

Catie Talarski

We know that music, pets, and exercise make us feel good - but did you know they can also make our aging brains stronger? 

It used to be that getting older meant forgetting more, slowing down, and acting more and more like our grandparents. But no more. We can add years to our lives and boost our brain power by learning to play an instrument, jog around the block, or even bond with our dog.

Gov. Dannel Malloy has promised to move more than 5,000 poor and disabled patients out of nursing homes in five years.  But he says there's an obstacle -- a state law that says only nurses can give medications to people in the Medicaid system living at home. The governor's plan has faced some opposition in the legislature.

Flickr Creative Commons, Jay Erickson

Three former prisoners at Niantic's York Correctional Institution are staging a play mixing Dante’s Inferno with real life prison stories. WNPR’s Patrick Skahill has more.

When Lynda Gardner was sent to jail for larceny in 2005, she didn't think she'd be reciting lines from Dante's Inferno.  She just thought she was in hell.

"I woke up in York and decided for the first six months I was going to kill myself," Gardner said. " I felt dead."

Smaller Hospitals Struggle With Deficits

Apr 17, 2012

Eight of Connecticut’s 30 acute-care hospitals ended the last fiscal year in the red—double the number that reported financial losses the year before, according to a new state report.

The data filed with the state Office of Health Care Access (OHCA) is a mixed bag of news about the financial health of the state’s hospitals. It shows that only six hospitals had operating losses in the 2011 fiscal year in contrast with nine that did not break even on operations in 2010. But when non-operating gains and losses are included, eight had negative total margins, or deficits.

Uma Ramiah

INTRO: As the New England Journal of Medicine celebrates its 200th anniversary, a national debate has been brewing about the close relationship between money and medicine. In the first of a 2-part series, the Connecticut Mirror’s Neena Satija examines how researchers come under fire for taking industry money, yet can’t survive without it.

Rusty Clark/flickr creative commons

Does what we eat control our thoughts and feelings? After many studies, a neuroscientist says it's true.

JeffreyTurner, Creative Commons

The housing crisis that has cost millions of Americans their homes.  In fact, banks have foreclosed on more than 4 million homes since the crisis began in 2007. Almost 6 million are still in danger of foreclosure, and some analysts say 2012 could be the worst year yet.

Athletes over Fifty

Apr 3, 2012

Today's show was the brainchild of producer Betsy Kaplan, but it seems like something I might have thought up, just to deal with some (de)pressing problems in my life. I'm 57. I have arthritis in both knees. One of the magazines I write for wants me to do, this fall, a Gran Fondo, a bike ride of more than 100 miles with a significant elevation change.

I'm literally not sure I can.

But all around me are examples of athletes over 50 doing remarkable things.