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Health

Michele Lamberti / Creative Commons

Guilt. Ah, yes, that awful, anxiety-ridden five-letter word. Most of us have experienced it. All of us have learned to dread it. But is a little guilt really such a bad thing?

This hour, we consider that question and more with a series of guilt (note we did not say “guilty”) experts. We check in with a researcher at the University of Virginia and with a psychologist based in New York. And we want to hear from you, too. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Watching her mother’s battle with diabetes fueled one Connecticut resident’s passion for health and fitness.

This hour, New Haven-based author and entrepreneur Mubarakah Ibrahim joins us.

We talk about her upcoming book, mR40 method, and learn about her unique journey as a wellness coach and Muslim-American. 

Stamford Hospital

Connecticut consumers were billed for more than $1 billion in facility fees for outpatient services in 2015 and 2016, documents filed with the state Office of Health Care Access (OHCA) show.

A low-temperature electron micrograph of E. coli bacteria, magnified 10,000 times.
Ericc Erbe, Christopher Pooley / Agricultural Research Service

Connecticut is one of seven states where cases of E. coli poisoning have been reported. The Centers for Disease Control is reporting 17 cases, including two in Connecticut.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service are investigating, but so far haven’t linked a specific food, grocery store, or restaurant chain as the source.

Colin Dunn / Creative Commons

A mosaic of boldly colored labels and brightly lit bottles, the vitamin aisle is as much a drug store staple as it is a monument to a multi-billion dollar industry. This hour, we trace the history of dietary supplement sales in the U.S. and consider why these supplements remain so popular today. 

SCOTT OLSON / GETTY IMAGES

As opioid overdose deaths rapidly increase, the U.S. Surgeon General is urging more people to carry naloxone, the overdose-reversal drug. The recommendation is strongly supported by The Connecticut State Medical Society.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When it comes to the nation’s opioid crisis, substance abuse affects more than the addict. More and more children are entering the foster care system every year at an unprecedented rate.

A petri dish of MRSA bacteria. Cleared areas indicate where dilutions of a solution with bacteriophages were applied, killing the surrounding colonies of bacteria.
Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Highly drug resistant gonorrhea has been reported in England. It’s the latest in a growing list of superbugs that are becoming resistant to last-resort antibiotics.

For much of the last century, doctors have been able to cure many once-fatal bacterial infections with a simple course of meds. But over the years, diseases have evolved and even the best drugs aren’t enough to combat the deadly bacteria.

This hour, we ask an infectious disease specialist--how worried should we be?

Shaheen Lakhan / Creative Commons

H.M. is one of the most important and studied human research subjects of all time. He revolutionized what we know about memory today because of the amnesia he developed after a lobotomy in 1953 to treat the severe epilepsy he developed after a head injury sustained earlier in life. 

Medical marijuana appears to have put a dent in the opioid abuse epidemic, according to two studies published Monday.

The research suggests that some people turn to marijuana as a way to treat their pain, and by so doing, avoid more dangerous addictive drugs. The findings are the latest to lend support to the idea that some people are willing to substitute marijuana for opioids and other prescription drugs.

Christina Carolus

For over a century, Americans have looked to National Geographic to learn about other people and cultures around the world.

Now for the first time ever, the magazine has acknowledged its “exotic” portrayals of other cultures, which it was known for during much of its history, were based on racist ideas.

Quinnipiac University's NAMI chapter handed out materials on mental health services.
Quinnipiac NAMI Chapter Photo

As anxiety and depression among college students soars, universities in Connecticut and nationally are expanding their mental health counseling, even offering courses that address mental well-being.

Dying In Prison

Mar 27, 2018
Rennett Stowe / Creative Commons

"Compassionate release" of our sickest and oldest prisoners is a way to reduce the federal prison population. It's also meant to save on the high cost of health care for aging inmates, and show some -  well, compassion, to prisoners closing in on the end of their lives. 

A pipe was the only sign of drug use near Chris Bennett’s body, in November. But it looked like the 32-year-old Taunton native had stopped breathing and died of an opioid overdose. Bennett’s mother Liisa couldn’t understand what happened. Then she saw the toxicology report.

“I’m convinced he was smoking cocaine that was laced,” she says. “That’s what he had in his system was cocaine and fentanyl.”

Government health agencies have spent more than two decades shying away from gun violence research, but some say the new spending bill, signed by President Trump on Friday, will change that.

That is because, in agency instructions that accompany the bill, there is a sentence noting that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has the authority to conduct research on the causes of gun violence.

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