WNPR

Arts and Culture

Since it opened in June, the new Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum has attracted thousands of visitors to Springfield. It features murals and statues of some of the author's most famous characters, like Horton the Elephant and the Cat in the Hat.

Copper Beech Institute

Recently, I hopped into my car to go home after a long and grinding first day back to work. I had just returned the day before from a two-week vacation exploring the treasures of two foreign countries I had never seen before. 

The abrupt transition from play to work left me feeling quite blue, made worse by my receding memories of those weeks. Something in me needed music.  So, I traded out my usual afternoon newscast for a "soul" song that caught my ear and brightened my heart. 

Columbia Pictures

"Close Encounters of the Third Kind" was originally released on December 14, 1977. It was nominated for seven Academy Awards and has gone on to gross more than $300 million worldwide. 

Facebook

The Connecticut Authors Trail wraps up its ninth season Thursday with a reading by Connecticut author Beatriz Williams at the Mohegan Sun Cabaret Theater.

Stephanie "TabbieWolf" Krus

Like just about anything else one delves into, the subculture known as furries is more nuanced, more varied and less sensational than mass media depictions of them.

Melania Trump is in many ways a first: The first First Lady to have arrived as an immigrant, the first to have been born in a communist country, and the first to be the 3rd wife of a president. She is not the first, however, to show signs of reluctance towards embracing the role of FLOTUS.

Raffaele Pagani / Flickr

Perhaps the most surprising thing about the Amazons of ancient Greek mythology is that they were not entirely mythical. While many of the deeds and details ascribed to these women warriors were imagined, the Amazons themselves were inspired by a real-life horse-riding tribe of nomads called the Scythians.

Waiting for the Word / Creative Commons

John Nichols, author of Horsemen of the Trumpocalypse: A Field Guide to The Most Dangerous People in America believes Donald Trump has put together the most dangerous cabinet in history. He says Trump has filled it with partisan ideologues or people with no government experience and/or unqualified to do the job of their department. 

The Weinstein Company

Taylor Sheridan's "Wind River" has been called "a thrilling, violent finale to the 'Hell or High Water' and 'Sicario' trilogy" (Sheridan wrote the first two entries and writes and directs this newest one). "River," starring Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen, is a character-driven murder mystery, more literary drama than genre thriller. The Nose renders its critique.

FBI / Wikimedia Commons

The FBI still doesn’t know what happened to $500 million dollars worth of  paintings stolen from Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 1990.

Em Lansey / Flickr

According to mytho-historical accounts, the ancient Amazons wore pants while riding into battle. But the trend this tribe of warrior women set was short lived. For nearly two millennia after their demise, the notion of women wearing pants was steeped in controversy.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The late Connecticut sculptor David Hayes liked seeing his work out in the public space. He wanted people to be able to move in and around his large, abstract steel pieces and discover the art’s meaning for themselves.

Eli Christman / Creative Commons

The violence in Charlottesville last month over whether or not to remove a statue of Confederate soldier Robert E. Lee rekindled a heated debate that's more about national identity and race than about statues. But, it's easier to fight about statues than begin a long-overdue national discussion over how we remember our collective and complex national past - especially in the context of slavery.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Herbert Hoover realized early in the 20th century that food was as important as bullets to win a war. After witnessing Belgians starve under the harsh treatment of Germany before World War I, he determined to never let that happen in America. So, when the men marched off to war in both World War I and again in World War II, the women marched out to the fields. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we remember Women’s History Month with tributes to the inspiring twentieth-century women -- the so-called "motor girls" and "Kalamazoo gals" -- who helped shape American history and American industry. 

Pages