Arts/Culture

Art
11:23 am
Sat January 25, 2014

Artist Transforms Guns To Make Music — Literally

Mexican artist Pedro Reyes received 6,700 weapons from the Mexican government, from which he sculpted instruments.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 25, 2014 12:14 pm

Pedro Reyes says being Mexican is like living in an apartment where an upstairs neighbor has a leaking swimming pool.

"Just what is leaking," says Reyes, "is hundreds of thousands of guns."

He wants people to think about the availability of guns in the United States, and the impact that has in Mexico.

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Host's Diary
5:35 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Things We Recommended, Alluded to, Discussed Off-Air and Otherwise Stood Still for on The Nose

Theresa Cramer.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Even if you heard the whole show, there would have been things you missed. 

I endorsed this Connecticut band. One of the singers sounds like Stephen Stills, a reference point which makes me seem old. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

The Nose: Bieber's Bust, Casting Peter Pan, and Scapegoating Maureen McDonnell

Theresa Cramer - Editor, Writer.
Chion Wolf WNPR

It was a fertile week for topics, but here at The Nose, we've boiled them down to four.

First, the decision by NBC to capitalize on its live Sound of Music ratings hit with a revival of the live TV Peter Pan. No cast has been announced yet, so that allows us to do some "dreamcasting. "

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History
11:47 am
Fri January 24, 2014

The Astronomical Event of the Century

Total Eclipse of the Sun, January 24, 1925. Turner took his photograph at 175 North Street in Willimantic.
Photograph by Fred Turner, 1925 The Connecticut Historical Society, X.2000.7.52

Snow covered the ground and the temperature hovered at zero degrees on the morning of January 24, 1925. Businesses were closed—or planned to open late—as crowds gathered on hilltops and rooftops throughout Connecticut. Special trains brought visitors from Boston and elsewhere in Massachusetts and scientists from around the country joined colleagues at Yale, Wesleyan, and Trinity. The sun had come up as normal, but about 8:30 am it began to grow dark again, as the moon passed between the earth and the sun.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:16 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Find Inspiration To Pursue Your Passion

Credit Barnaby Dorfman/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: For some, it's watching football, while for others it's swimming with sharks, or carving wood. If life is a grand adventure, why not pursue your own passionate interest?

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Latinos and Religion
5:07 am
Thu January 23, 2014

A Different Kind Of Catholicism Grows In Latino Communities

Worshippers are brought to tears at the Wednesday night Charismatic prayer meetings at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church in the Bronx, New York City.
Marlon Bishop Latino USA

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 7:48 pm

In the Saint Anthony of Padua Church in the Bronx, Wednesday night is prayer meeting night.

Fifty people gather in the spare assembly room for a ceremony that looks very different from a Catholic Sunday Mass.

For one thing, the service is led by a woman rather than a male priest. She preaches excitedly while a rock band of young Salvadoran immigrants backs her up.

Some people in the audience hold up their hands; others are swaying gently. There are tears in the crowd.

Suddenly, the woman stops speaking in Spanish and begins speaking in tongues.

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History
3:39 am
Thu January 23, 2014

From The Trenches To The Web: British WWI Diaries Digitized

The British National Archives has digitized and posted online about 1.5 million pages of diaries from soldiers and units that fought in World War I. Here, a photo of the 12th (Prince of Wales') Lancers Group.
From a private collection, provided courtesy of the National Archives

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 2:37 pm

On the outskirts of London, in a basement room of the British National Archives, a historian delicately turns pages that have the brittle feel of dead leaves. Each is covered in text — some typewritten, some in spidery handwriting from a pen that scratched across the page 100 years ago.

"Saturday, the 26th of September, 1914," reads one. "The most ghastly day of my life. And yet one of my proudest, because my regiment did its job and held on against heavy odds."

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Holocaust
2:06 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Film Documents Children's Rescue From the Nazis -- and One Lives in Hartford

Ivan Backer, 84, a Hartford resident rescued by Sir Nicholas Winton during the Nazi takeover of Prague.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Next Monday marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Next week in Woodbridge and Madison, there will be two screenings of the film "Nicky’s Family," a Czech documentary that tells the nearly-forgotten story of Sir Nicholas Winton, a British stockbroker who organized the rescue of 669 children just before start of World War II. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Food Schmooze: Balaboosta Chicken Soup

Credit Patrick Makhoul/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: My head snapped around at the idea of blending Middle Eastern and Mediterranean flavors. That's what Einat Admony does in her cookbook, Balaboosta. And there is nothing like her "Not So Jewish Chicken Soup," as she calls it. (Admony has a mixed Israeli heritage, Persian and Yemenite.)

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:00 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Asteroid Apocalypse: How Likely Is It?

Artist's view ofa watery asteroid in white dwarf star system GD 61.
Credit Hubble Space Telescope / Creative Commons

Scientists say that the asteroid that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia this past February was a rare event, unlikely to happen more than every 100 -200 years. But a recent paper in the scientific journal Nature said the earth should expect and plan to get hit by Chelyabinsk-sized asteroids more often-- maybe every decade or two.

This news sparked a flurry of talk about what that means for us on earth. How vulnerable are we and are we doing enough to detect and deflect asteroids?

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Jazz Corridor
5:45 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Matt Wilson Quartet to Deliver a Gathering Call With Pianist John Medeski

The Matt Wilson Quartet. From left: Kirk Knuffke, Jeff Lederer, Matt Wilson, and Chris Lightcap.
Credit Tom Foley

Drummer/composer Matt Wilson, a great wit, percussive prestidigitator and populist swinger in all known jazz genres, celebrates his new, diverse and delightful album, Gathering Call, on Tuesday, January 28. Wilson performs with his tightly-knit quartet and special guest, pianist John Medeski, at 8:00 pm at The Side Door jazz club in Old Lyme.

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The Faith Middleton Show
2:53 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Your Memories of Winter Snowstorms

Credit Shawn Nystrand/flickr creative commons

Down it comes, and when those crystals hit, the covering is beautiful, quiet, and sometimes threatening.

Tell us a snow story, whether it's one of delight or one of fear of destruction. Do you have snow traditions—sugar on snow, a sleigh ride, igloo building, snow shoeing?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:10 am
Tue January 21, 2014

The Scramble Is on the Scrimmage Line

The Miniature Football Coaches Association is comprised of hobbyists and collectors passionate about electric football
Credit Stefano Tinti/iStock / Thinkstock

Through no act of overarching planning, all three of our segments today will deal directly, or otherwise, with sports.

In our first segment, we talk with Linda Holmes from the NPR culture blog, Monkey See. We also delve into the controversy over a recent New York Times column by former executive editor, Bill Keller

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Time To Eat The Dogs?
4:57 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

Shackleton: He's So Hot Right Now

Ernest Shackleton leaves Elephant Island on the James Caird with five other members of the expedition, setting out to reach South Georgia Island 800 miles away.
Credit Frank Hurley

Years ago, I needed a book for a long plane ride home from Austin, Texas. My cousin threw me a tattered paperback. It looked mediocre at best: on the cover was an iceberg, a ship, and the word ENDURANCE in bold letters.

A short time and several chapters later, I would start what some would call an obsession with a man named Ernest Shackleton, and one of the most incredible adventure/survival stories ever. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Can Music and Art Bring Countries Together?

Credit Nic McPhee/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired October 29, 2013. 

From Faith Middleton: Music and art can make your life bigger. And, under the theory that the world is now “flat,” music and art just might dissolve boundaries, making the world a more manageable place.

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Against Me!
12:47 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Laura Jane Grace, Transgender Punk, On Life In Transition

Against Me!'s latest album is Transgender Dysphoria Blues. Left to right: Inge Johansson, James Bowman, Laura Jane Grace, Atom Willard.
Ryan Russell Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 9:42 am

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History
2:59 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Dressing Gowns: Loungewear of Old

Byron and Marianna. This lithograph by Hartford’s Kellogg brothers provides a glimpse of early nineteenth-century leisure wear. Note how Byron (d. 1824) is depicted in a dressing gown rather than a restrictive jacket.
Hand-colored lithograph by E.B. & E.C. Kellogg, 1845-1846. 1994.13.0. Connecticut Historical Society

Today many people cannot wait to arrive home after a long day at work and exchange their work clothes for something more relaxing, comfortable, and cozy. This is not a new phenomenon. Even before the nineteenth century, men and women sometimes wore informal and less confining clothing at home and in informal social settings. These dressing gowns, as they were primarily known, allowed people to appear fashionable while remaining comfortable.

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Adorbs or Cray?
11:27 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Researchers Are Totes Studying How Ppl Shorten Words On Twitter

Some clippings: "Hilar" or "hilars" mean "hilarious." "Alc" is shorthand for "alcohol" in some circles. And "obvi" is pretty straightforward (er, "obvious").
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 1:31 pm

Shortening words, swapping them out, giving them different meanings — that's not new. Remember in Mean Girls when the queen bee character, Regina George, berated one of her underlings for trying to make the word "fetch" catch on?

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Host's Diary
10:44 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Why It Makes Even Less Sense Than Usual to Follow The Oscars This Year

It's not even a matter of "snubs."

This year's Oscar nominations got it so wrong as to make a reasonable debate about what happens, going forward, almost impossible.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:01 am
Fri January 17, 2014

The Nose Falls in Love With Its Operating System

James Hanley is the co-founder of Cinestudio at Trinity College.
Chion Wolf WNPR

The Nose panel went to the movies this week to see the critically-acclaimed Spike Jonze film, "Her," about a future world in which it's not unusual for a man to fall in love with his artificially-intelligent operating system. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Alt-Weeklies: Will the Future of Local News and Culture Be as Fruitful as the Past?

Alt-weeklies have long provided the the latest in local arts, culture, and politics.
Credit Mike Licht / Creative Commons

For 38 years, The New Haven Advocate looked after its city with watchdog eyes. Each week, the alt-weekly’s team of reporters gave voice to local arts, politics, and fringe culture, providing New Haven residents with some of the the country’s most highly-respected pieces of long-form and investigative journalism.

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Bravo Waterbury!
3:21 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

Music Program in Waterbury Teaches Children Team-Building Skills

The Asylum Saxophone Quartet featuring Bravo Waterbury! woodwinds.
Credit Bravo Waterbury!

Two years ago, we reported on plans to launch after-school music education programs for low-income children in several Connecticut cities. The programs are inspired by El Sistema, a music phenomenon in Venezuela that’s touched the lives of hundreds of thousands of kids, and captured the attention of the world. WNPR’s Diane Orson now reports on Bravo Waterbury!, an initiative of the Waterbury Symphony Orchestra.

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The Faith Middleton Show
1:25 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

Wally Lamb's Latest Novel, We Are Water

Author Wally Lamb
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Today's show originally aired November 18, 2013.  

From Faith Middleton: Wally Lamb's books beat with a human heart.

Many people, especially Wally Lamb's fans, recall that his first novel, She's Come Undone, was selected by Oprah's book club. But what I remember is the experience of riding in the New York subway, and seeing so many people bumping along, engrossed in his story. On one occasion, these subway readers, strangers to each other, started a discussion about the book—possibly the first underground book club. 

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Strange Dining
3:28 am
Thu January 16, 2014

Sometimes A Perfect Stranger Is The Best Dinner Host

A group gathers in a Ballston, Va., home for a supper club organized through the site Feastly. A new food trend gaining popularity in New York and other cities lets diners enjoy a meal prepared by a stranger in that person's home.
Courtesy of Noah Karesh

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 3:07 pm

With website names like Eat With, Side Tour, VoulezVousDiner and Feastly, a new food trend that is sweeping New York and other cities allows diners to enjoy fine meals inside someone else's home.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:00 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

The Complications of Comedy

Didi Conn and Burke Moses
Chion Wolf

Dying is easy, comedy is hard. But, why is comedy so hard, especially on the stage, and what makes something funny?

The premise for a famously funny plot could easily sound like a tragedy.  An out of work actor is so desperate for employment that he dresses up like a woman and then falls in love with a beautiful co-star whom he deceives and betrays on several levels. That doesn't sound that hilarious. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Food Schmooze: Easy Dinner: Shrimp and Bacon on Buttermilk Corn Pancakes

Credit will law/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton Cornbread, corn muffins, corn pudding—if it's corn-centric, I'm all in. That's why I love to serve savory corn pancakes for supper.

I like to think of a corn pancake as a raft, a vehicle for anything wonderful that comes to mind. My new favorite topping for these savory buttermilk corn pancakes is shrimp, diced tomatoes, and crumbled bacon, served with a dollop of lime zest sour cream, all of which can be prepared ahead.

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Jazz Corridor
5:45 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Soul-Soaked Brass Maestro Graces Side Door Jazz This Weekend

Trumpeter Nicholas Payton is from New Orleans.
Credit Michael Wilson

A super talent like trumpeter Nicholas Payton could have easily coasted through a long, successful career by safely resting on his impressive laurels and never once rocking the boat musically or socially, thus remaining securely assured of achieving a prominent niche for himself.

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The Race Card Project
3:03 am
Wed January 15, 2014

A Woman Comes To Terms With Her Family's Slave-Owning Past

"I have this day granted bargained and sold and by these present do grant bargain and sell unto the said Edward Clegg a Certain Mulatto Girl named Harriet aged about eight years. Slave for life, and sound in body and mind, and the title to said Girl I do hereby warrant and will forever defend."
Courtesy of Todd Perry

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 3:38 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often, NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Wesleyan Poetry
3:10 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Young Poet's 'Shrinking Women' Goes Viral

Lily Meyer performs at the College Unions Poetry Slam Invitation in 2013. Her poem, "Shrinking Women" went viral. (Screenshot from CUPSI)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 5:13 pm

[Youtube]

Lily Myers intended her poem “Shrinking Women” to be a personal one.

But a video of her recital at the 2013 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational was posted to the poetry website Button Poetry and to The Huffington Post, where it went viral.

With more than 3 million views, it continues to circulate across social media websites.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:35 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Cheap Flights, Upgrading Hotel Rooms

Credit Matt @ PEK/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: There are last minute winter vacation getaways. You can find great hotel rooms in major cities. And locate cheap ski lift tickets.

Travel + Leisure magazine's Trip Doctor, Amy Farley, is a tipster to follow for cheap flights, seat changes, and the best online sources for all kinds of travel deals.

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