Arts/Culture

Host's Diary
10:48 am
Fri March 7, 2014

The Walrus Was Marty: A Nose Worksheet

Fawcett Publications. Edited by August Derleth, via Wikimedia Commons

In 1969, I was a high school sophomore, and I fell completely -- and embarrassingly uncritically -- for the Paul Is Dead mania. My own interest was fueled by revelations from the previous academic year. Under the spell of a young teacher named Tyler C. Tingley, I had come to see that Beatles lyrics were stuffed with symbolism and multiple meaning.  

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Early Punk Pics
10:31 am
Fri March 7, 2014

A New Exhibit Focuses on New Haven's Punk Past

Tom Hearn captured this candid shot of Debbie Harry after a photo shoot for "Punk" magazine in 1977.
Tom Hearn

Part of The Elm City's rock and roll past will be on display in an exhibit opening Friday night at Cafe Nine in New Haven. It's called The Early Years of Punk in New Haven, and features the work of photographer Tom Hearn.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:24 am
Fri March 7, 2014

The Nose Explores True Entertainment and "Normcore"

Theresa Cramer is a writer and the editor of E-Content Magazine, where she covers the world of digital media.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Can great television be as satisfying as great literature? On today's Nose, we'll apply that question to HBO's True Detective. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Mental Illness, Jayson Blair, and Women Composers

The Women Composers Festival of Hartford celebrates its 14th year at Hartford's Charter Oak Cultural Center.
Credit shadowslicer1 / Creative Commons

Life with bipolar disorder is not easy for anyone. For a prominent psychiatrist, it has provided a very important window into how to treat others. Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison from Johns Hopkins University joins us, author of the bestselling memoir about living with bipolar disorder, An Unquiet Mind. We talk to her in advance of her appearance at Friday night's Connecticut Forum.

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Outstanding Institutions
3:58 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Connecticut Museums and Libraries Among National Medal Finalists

The Hartford Public Library sits on Main Street in downtown Hartford
Hartford Public Library

Each year, the federal agency that supports libraries and museums recognizes 30 outstanding institutions for service to the community. This year, four finalists are in Connecticut. 

They include the Otis Library in Norwich, the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, and Mystic Aquarium in Mystic.

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Exhibits
2:23 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Exhibit Highlights Traditional Arts By Refugees and New Immigrants

Lynne Williamson

A giant woven carpet, intricate hand-made lace, brilliantly colored baskets and textiles are some of the traditional arts featured at a new exhibition in Hartford.

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Technology
12:03 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

SXSW Tech Preview: Snooping, Wearables And More 3-D Printing

Hugh Forrest, pictured here in 2009, is the director of South by Southwest Interactive.
Scott Beale Flickr

South by Southwest Interactive is the technology-driven part of the annual Austin-based festival for digital, film and music and it starts on Friday. An expected 30,000 people will take part in the interactive and film week that precedes music, and they love it for the spontaneity and the chaos. They also hate it because of the chaos — parties on every corner, marketing handouts at every turn and a sprawling program of panels, screenings and speakers that span at least a dozen city blocks in the heart of Texas.

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:02 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

The Book Show: March 6, 2014

Credit Brenda Clarke/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired February 6, 2014.  

Faith's motto on The Book Show is… Life is short, but it can be ever so wide.

Join Faith and her book buddies for a call-in show recommending terrific books to read in all categories. If you're in a book club, please tell us what you've read and enjoyed.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:38 am
Thu March 6, 2014

The Psychology and Sociology of Coming Out of the Closet

Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra & Actor Brian Murray.
Chion Wolf WNPR

In the space of a lifetime, the status of gay and lesbian people in the United States and Western Europe has been transformed. So to watch a play like "A Song at Twilight," written by Noel Coward in 1966, is to journey back in time and then wonder how far, really one has traveled.

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Names
8:48 am
Thu March 6, 2014

How Not To Name Your Baby

Kids, is there a right way to find the right name for them?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 1:49 pm

Six weeks ago today, I gave birth to a baby girl. Like her older sister, she spent the first few days of life without a name.

You see, my husband and I wanted to get our children's names just right, and that meant taking some time to consider the options and get a feel for how well they fit each new baby. But we also happen to be cognitive scientists of an evidence-based persuasion so, for us, it also meant gathering and analyzing some data.

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Redeployment
7:09 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Reminder From A Marine: Civilians And Veterans Share Ownership Of War

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 2:47 pm

"Marines and soldiers don't issue themselves orders, they don't send themselves overseas," says former Marine Phil Klay. "United States citizens elect the leaders who send us overseas."

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First Amendment
3:04 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Anti-Muslim Video Still Stirring Controversy In The Courtroom

Actress Cindy Lee Garcia (right) brought a copyright claim against Google with the help of attorney Cris Armenta over the film Innocence of Muslims, which was posted to YouTube in 2012.
Jason Redmond AP

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 11:43 pm

Google intends to fight a court order to remove a controversial anti-Muslim video from YouTube in the U.S.

The company plans to file for a hearing before a full nine-judge panel of the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals after two of three judges on a smaller panel forced the company to take down the film, Innocence of Muslims, which caused uproar in the Islamic world in 2012.

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Jazz Corridor
3:00 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Bass Wizard Makes Side Door Swing Open

Dezron Douglas.
Credit Gulnara Khamatova / Dezron Douglas

A master of time, tone and fluent invention, bassist Dezron Douglas, one of Hartford’s great gifts to the jazz world, leads his quartet on consecutive nights on Friday, March 7, and Saturday, March 8, at the Side Door Jazz Club in Old Lyme.

His primetime quartet features the premier pianist Cyrus Chestnut—Douglas’s longtime boss—the drummer Victor Lewis, a consummate synthesizer of subtlety and swing; and the smart saxophonist Lummie Spann, another one of Hartford’s Young Lions making a name for himself both on and beyond the New York jazz scene.

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Behind the Scenes
10:23 am
Wed March 5, 2014

A Psychological Game Of Casting For 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

Ralph Fiennes portrays concierge Monsieur Gustave in The Grand Budapest Hotel, the actor' first project with director Wes Anderson.
Bob Yeoman Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 9:34 am

Watching Wes Anderson's films can often feel like a tumble down a rabbit hole. With the opening credits comes entry into a world that's both weird and wonderful. The writer and director of movies like Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and Moonrise Kingdom has long had a point of view that is completely original — even dating back to the fifth grade, when he and a friend dramatized a Kenny Rogers album.

"We built quite a nice set," Anderson recalls. "We just performed the whole album of The Gambler with puppets playing instruments."

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Throw a Twice-Baked Potato Party

Credit Alan Sheffield/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: The twice-baked potato is one of the ultimate comfort foods, and as easy to do as it is delicious. Because of its umami charm, I just threw a twice-baked potato party that was a big hit. All you do is prepare a big salad, and put out bowls of add-ins so your guests can make their own stuffing mixtures for the final 30-minute baking session.

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Code Switch
7:03 am
Wed March 5, 2014

For Black And Latino Americans, A Glass Mysteriously Half-Full

Why are these stock photo models of color so smiley? (You could ask that question about all stock photo models of color.)
istockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 7:55 pm

Over the last few years an unusual phenomenon has kept popping up in public opinion surveys: Blacks and Latinos have become much more sanguine about the country's prospects as white folks have become more pessimistic. It's a stark reversal of decades of data in which white folks were almost always more optimistic.

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Radio
2:33 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

After 5-Decade Career, NPR's Carl Kasell Will Retire

Doby Photography NPR

After a five-decade career in broadcasting, Carl Kasell announced his retirement on Tuesday.

Carl will record his final broadcast for Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me! this spring. He will, however, remain "scorekeeper emeritus" for the show. Before becoming the official scorekeeper for the NPR news quiz show in 1998, Carl anchored the newscast for Morning Edition.

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:09 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Miss Manners Minds Your Business

Credit herval/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired January 28, 2014.  

From Faith Middleton: The "doyenne of civility," Judith Martin, a.k.a. Miss Manners, has decided that the fast-changing modern workplace could use some tips on what is and is not okay. And she delivers it in her characteristic dry, witty way, in the book she has co-authored with her son, Nicholas Ivor Martin—Miss Manners Minds Your Business.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:58 am
Tue March 4, 2014

It's Grammar Day! Is My Exclamation Point Wrong?

Peter Sokolowski is Editor-at-Large at Merriam-Webster.
Chion Wolf WNPR

It's National Grammar Day, a time to take stock of the current status of the English language, and possibly get into bitter fights.

I'm old school. I'm the kind of person who will only use "not only" if I intend to follow it with "but also." That's probably a convention that died the quiet death of a feverish sloth many years ago. But I know what's right, and sometimes it feels like I'm helping to hold the language together even as it drifts into chaos.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:37 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Remembering Great Books

Credit rtitoun/flickr creative commons

If you're in search of great reads, here's a list to get you started. Gina Barreca joins Faith to talk about the books many of us have forgotten about.  

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:34 am
Mon March 3, 2014

The Scramble: Are A.J. Jacobs, Lupita Nyong'o, and John Rowland Related?

Credit Rick / Creative Commons

Today on The Scramble, one of our favorite writers, A.J. Jacobs takes us deep inside the world of modern ancestry research where websites are all  too happy to tell you that you're distantly related to Gwynyth Paltrow, Michael Bloomberg, Quincy Jones, and King David.  Those are all actual examples of people A.J. was told are his relatives. 

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Academy Awards
6:58 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

'12 Years A Slave,' 'Gravity' Win Big At The Oscars

Red carpet's ready: The rope line awaits at Hollywood & Highland Center.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 10:37 am

After several days of heavy rain in Los Angeles, the sun came out just as the 86th annual Academy Awards got underway at the Dolby Theater.

The big award of the night, for Best Picture, went to 12 Years a Slave. The film tells the harrowing tale of Solomon Northup, a free black man in New York who was sold into slavery. (See the full list of winners below.)

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Academy Awards
6:05 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

Oscar Spoiler Alert: What We Already Know About The Winners

Actress Lupita Nyong'o may very well win an Oscar Sunday night. And if she does, she will have gotten votes from people who can't be bothered to learn her name.
Gabriel Olsen Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 12:38 pm

Sunday night's Oscars will include a Best Picture race that's apparently narrowed to three films: 12 Years A Slave, Gravity, and maybe American Hustle. Matthew McConaughey for Best Actor? Maybe. Or Leonardo DiCaprio? What about Cate Blanchett, a seeming shoo-in despite Meryl Streep delivering, in August Osage County, the biggest, chewiest, most Oscar-friendly performance of all time?

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Mardi Gras
7:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Throw Me Something (Again), Mister: Mardi Gras Beads Revived

Beads are essential to celebrating Mardi Gras season in New Orleans, but what happens to the tokens when the revelry ends?
Sean Garnder Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 11:30 am

In Louisiana, Mardi Gras comes each year with dozens of parades filled with marching bands, colorful floats and parade-goers who scream, "Throw me something, Mister!"

That "something" the crowd wants are beads. The goal of any Mardi Gras parade is to catch as many as possible. After the revelry, people often have so many beads around their necks they can barely turn their heads.

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The Oscars
7:08 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

The Human Moments We Miss, Backstage At The Oscars

Every year, Entertainment Weekly writer Anthony Breznick covers the Oscars from behind the scenes.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Picture this: You're standing on a stage. You're the center of attention in an auditorium filled with over 3,000 people. Roughly 40 million more are watching you on TV.

No, this isn't a nightmare — it's the Academy Awards. Every year, the standout members of the film industry are presented with Hollywood's highest honor: an Oscar.

But what happens after you've won the coveted gold statue? What does it feel like to walk away from the flashbulbs and fans, and step into the quiet darkness behind the curtains?

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Spotlight on the Arts
4:21 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Cheers to Picasso and Other Art World Legends

Studio at the rue des Grands-Augustins, 1990-96 by Red Grooms

Red Grooms dreams big, and draws large. Using paint, colored pencils, charcoal, and crayon, his super-sized canvases about life within the art world won’t just warm your heart; they will enlarge it three-fold.

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History
11:51 am
Fri February 28, 2014

The Great Ice Storm of 1898

Greenwoods Road from Carl Stoeckel Mansion, Norfolk, Connecticut. Photograph by Marie Kendall, 1898.
The Connecticut Historical Society, 1981.58.6

Ice. It is both a beauty and a menace, often simultaneously. From February 20 to February 22, 1898, an ice storm swept through northwestern Connecticut, coating tree branches and utility wires.

Roads were treacherous and slippery. Tree branches, weighed down with ice, broke and fell, rendering some streets impassable. The storm knocked out electricity and telegraph and telephone communications, and closed the trolley lines in parts of the state. The railroad trains kept running, though their tracks had to be cleared of branches and debris, and they arrived well behind schedule.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:51 am
Fri February 28, 2014

The Nose Predicts High Drama at the Academy Awards

Vivian Nabeta is the Director of Arts, Culture, and Tourism for the city of New Haven.
Chion Wolf WNPR

We have a question: Where does Adam Sandler watch the Oscars? Does he sit there with all the people who are actually up for awards, or is he home alone, with his baseball cap on backwards?

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Host's Diary
9:12 am
Fri February 28, 2014

A Judge, Rendered Homicidal by Grammar

Credit GiantsFanatic / Creative Commons

The Colin McEnroe Show is featuring an episode on grammar next Tuesday. 

Below we have a "fatal" example of a misplaced modifier. I'm fairly certain the judge didn't do any of those horrible things. (h/t R.R. Cooper)

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Madres De Plaza De Mayo
8:37 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Argentina's "Dirty War" Provides Backdrop for a New Play

A scene from Claire Whitehouse's play "a la ronda" based on stories from the Madres de Plaza de Mayo.
Credit Ariella Axelbank

  A la ronda, a new play opening this weekend at Wesleyan University, calls attention to Argentina's "Dirty War" and the human rights organization Madres de Plaza de Mayo.

During the so called "dirty war" of the late 70's and early 80's, tens of thousands of Argentineans were systematically abducted and killed, suspected of being an enemy of the military dictatorship.

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