Arts/Culture

Country Music
11:16 am
Thu August 14, 2014

Connecticut Country Singer to Perform at Hartford County 4H Fair in Somers

Katie Perkins.
Laura Ink

When Katie Perkins, 24, a country singer and East Lyme native, started performing with a band, it was sometimes hard to find country-friendly venues in the area. As part of a burgeoning country scene in the state, Perkins will perform Friday night in Somers at the Hartford County 4-H Fair, August 15 to 17.

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Jazz Corridor
10:31 am
Wed August 13, 2014

New Haven Jazz Festival Features Harold Mabern in Free Concert on the Green

Harold Mabern
Alan Nahigian

“With the wind at his back, he can sound like an ocean roar.” Using meteorological and oceanographic allusions fit for portraying a mythic hero, jazz critic Gary Giddins described the powerhouse pianist Harold Mabern, a life force on the jazz scene for more than half a century.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:06 am
Wed August 13, 2014

Ugh! I Can't Remember My Password!

Credit Meme Binge / Creative Commons

Once upon a time you opened your first email account and picked out a password. You probably don't know what it was now but let's assume you weren't the type of person to pick out "password" or "123456." So, maybe it was the name of a dog or a kid or two dog and kid names mushed together. Easy to remember, right?

Today, you probably have passwords tied to multiple email accounts, a few social media platforms, a few credit cards and banks, and an unclassifiable hodgepodge of other stuff from Dropbox to Airbnb.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Wed August 13, 2014

Food Schmooze: Easy Thai Summer Rolls

Credit Steven Depolo/flickr creative commons

Years ago in southern California, at ocean-side Montage Resort, I ordered the same thing for six lunches in a row—Thai summer roll with dipping sauce. It was a knockout, and now we can tell you how to make delicious ones at home. We can tell you how thanks to a respected chef, Gale Gand, author of Gale Gand's Lunch! As Gale told us, she learned from a Thai woman who was making them as fast as she could manage for thousands of hungry fans at the Lolllapalooza music festival. And wait till you try her watermelon gazpacho.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:22 am
Tue August 12, 2014

Wally Lamb's Latest Novel, We Are Water

Author Wally Lamb
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Wally Lamb's books beat with a human heart.

Many people, especially Wally Lamb's fans, recall that his first novel, She's Come Undone, was selected by Oprah's book club. But what I remember is the experience of riding in the New York subway, and seeing so many people bumping along, engrossed in his story. On one occasion, these subway readers, strangers to each other, started a discussion about the book—possibly the first underground book club. 

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Remembrance
7:56 am
Tue August 12, 2014

Robin Williams: A Supreme Talent Who Was Always On

Robin Williams performs during the Sixth Annual Stand Up for Heroes charity event at the Beacon Theatre in New York in 2012.
Mike Coppola Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 12, 2014 11:16 am

For many years, Robin Williams seemed like a talent who had no off switch.

From his standup comedy work to TV roles to talk show appearances to Oscar-caliber movies and performances on Broadway, Williams was a dervish of comedy — tossing off one-liners, biting asides and sidesplitting routines in a blizzard of accents, attitudes and goodhearted energy.

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Shark Meat
3:30 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

'Shark Week' Fuels Shark-Meat Feeding Frenzy At Restaurants

Take a bite — or or maybe don't — of this beer-battered mako shark taco with cabbage, pico de gallo, avocado, arbol chile and cream from Guerilla Tacos in Los Angeles.
T.Tseng/Flickr

Originally published on Mon August 11, 2014 4:31 pm

Discovery Channel set viewership records in 2013 as millions of people tuned in to watch sharks feed, sharks attack, extinct giant sharks and researchers catch and tag sharks. Discovery's "Shark Week" returned on Sunday, and this year, to the dismay of conservationists, restaurants and markets nationwide are feeding the frenzy with a slew of shark meat promotions.

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:51 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

NYC Teacher Grace Kiley: Acting Lessons

Credit Mickey Thurman/flickr creative commons

New York City acting teacher Grace Kiley is interested in the natural actor. Understandable, since she is a licensed mental health counselor who has a gift for teaching what contributes to a transformative performance on stage or on film.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:52 am
Mon August 11, 2014

The Scramble: Working Less, Misandry, and Violence in Auto Racing

Credit Ben Newton / Creative Commons

We cover a lot of the ground on The Scramble this hour. We starting with Maria Konnikova, a New Yorker writer, who’s going to lead me through a conversation about proposals for a drastically reduced work week, about ways in which having more choices may actually reduce our sense of happiness and fulfillment, and about the illusion that we can taste something—wine, in this case —in a state of pure isolation and detachment from outside influences. 

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1814 Bicentennial
9:13 am
Mon August 11, 2014

Stonington Remembers Its Extraordinary Battle

The Stonington Battle Flag is carried in the parade marking the bicentennial of the conflict
Harriet Jones WNPR

In August of 1814, the tiny village of Stonington scored an unlikely military victory by repelling the might of the British Navy. This weekend, the town celebrated the bicentennial of that extraordinary battle.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:28 am
Fri August 8, 2014

The Nose Remembers Its Boyhood

Tracy Wu-Fastenberg is the Director of Development at the Mark Twain House & Museum
Chion Wolf WNPR

Watching Richard Linklater's "Boyhood", you keep waiting for the car crash, or the random act of violence that puts one of the characters into Intensive Care. Not because he gives you any reason to expect that, but because watching a lot of movies and television conditions us to anticipate a rhythm of plot points and dramatic upheavals, and then they don't come. Because one of Linklater's points is that time itself is a series of upheavals. Just growing up and growing old is a harrowing, exciting, and mind-blowing process. It turns out that the best way to make a movie about everything is to make a movie in which not much happens. We'll talk about the wildly original "Boyhood" on The Nose.

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History
9:48 am
Fri August 8, 2014

A New Level of Performing Artistry: Carmina Burana at the Hartford Ballet

Scene from 1986 production of Carmina Burana.
The Connecticut Historical Society, 2001.75.

The Carmina Burana, a medieval collection of poetry, illustrating the fate of man through life, was set to music by the German composer Carl Orff and was first performed at Frankfurt-am-Main in 1937.  Following the Second World War, Ernst Uthoff, a German refuge, created a ballet based on the work for the Chilean National Ballet, which he founded. The production toured throughout South America, and appeared New York’s Lincoln Center in 1962.

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Arts Partnership
9:32 am
Fri August 8, 2014

Hartford Symphony Appoints Orchestra Management Director

Stephen Collins.
Credit Connecticut DECD

The Hartford Symphony Orchestra has appointed a Director of Artistic Operations and Administration.

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Monkey Selfie
7:53 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

If A Monkey Takes A Photo, Who Owns The Copyright?

This 2011 image captured by a cheeky black macaque after turning the tables on a photographer who left his camera unmanned has ignited a debate over who owns the photo.
David J Slater Caters News Agency/Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 8:04 pm

An argument is brewing between British photographer David Slater and the folks at Wikimedia over who owns the rights to a photo a monkey took with Slater's equipment. The website says the famous photo should be freely distributed, because it believes the animal's self-portrait isn't bound by copyright law.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:00 am
Thu August 7, 2014

The New Science of Building Brain Power

Credit aJ Gazmen/flickr creative commons

For over a century, IQ scores have been viewed by scientists as placing an upper limit on what a person can ever achieve: a cognitive glass ceiling, a number tattooed on the soul.

Shattering decades of that kind of dogma, scientists began publishing studies in 2008 showing that “fluid intelligence”—the ability to learn, solve novel problems, and get to the heart of things—can be increased through training. But is it all just hype?

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Crime Fiction
10:58 am
Thu August 7, 2014

Mystery Writer Evokes The Sights, Sound And Grime Of 1970s New York

The Empire State Building shines while Greenwich Village remains dark during the 1977 New York City blackout.
Carlos Rene Perez AP

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 9:08 am

Crime fiction writer Lawrence Block lives in New York's West Village, in a stately art deco building overlooking Abingdon Square. He bought an apartment there decades before actress Jennifer Aniston did. (She sold hers shortly thereafter.) Block is 76, silver-haired and keen-eyed; and in his pastel shirt and khakis, he looks decidedly more Hamptons than downtown.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:07 am
Thu August 7, 2014

A Salute to Accordions!

Cory Pesaturo is a multiple award-winning accordion player from Rhode Island
Chion Wolf WNPR

Here are some songs from your life, "Backstreet Girl" by the Rolling Stones, "Joey" by Bob Dylan, "Road to Nowhere" by the Talking Heads, "Boy In The Bubble" by Paul Simon, "July Fourth, Asbury Park", better known as "Sandy" by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, "Wouldn't It Be Nice" by the Beach Boys. They all rely heavily on the accordion.

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Bluegrass
9:55 am
Thu August 7, 2014

Podunk Bluegrass Festival in the Land of Steady Habits

The Claire Lynch Band, a headline performer at the Podunk Bluegrass Festival.
Facebook

When you think of Connecticut, bluegrass music may not immediately jump to mind, but there is a bluegrass scene here in the Land of Steady Habits. Starting on Thursday night, fans will gather at the Hebron Fairgrounds in Hebron for the Podunk Bluegrass Festival. 

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The 38th Voyage
8:52 am
Thu August 7, 2014

Home From the Sea, the Charles W. Morgan Ends Historic Voyage

The CHARLES W. MORGAN approaches Chubb's Wharf at Mystic Seaport on August 6.
Mystic Seaport

The world’s last wooden whaling ship, the Charles W. Morgan, is back at her dock at Mystic Seaport at the end of her historic 38th voyage. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:16 am
Wed August 6, 2014

August Fun: Have a Clam Bake

Credit Arnold Gatilao/flickr creative commons

There's still some summer left and we have ideas for clam bakes, grilled shrimp, and cocktails, along with plenty of kitchen tips. We also have a great recipe for a portobello mushroom po' boy.

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Jazz Corridor
9:10 am
Wed August 6, 2014

Cyrus Chestnut Displays Piano Prowess at Prestigious Litchfield Jazz Festival

Cyrus Chestnut.
Cyrus Chestnut

Graced with the robust technique of a premier concert hall pianist, Cyrus Chestnut is totally absorbed in exploring and celebrating the seemingly unlimited sonic potential of his grand instrument, using its keyboard and pedals to generate resonant, thickly-textured, amazingly agile, nuanced orchestral effects. 

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The "Apparently" Kid
9:39 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

'Apparently' This Is The Funniest 5-Year-Old In America

"I don't watch the news because I'm a kid," Noah Ritter, 5, said in an interview at the Wayne County Fair in Pennsylvania. He went on to show that he belongs on TV.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 10:43 am

We can't resist passing along the phenomenon that is Noah Ritter, a young man who's taking the Internet by storm. The 5-year-old's interview at Pennsylvania's Wayne County Fair is a wonder of stream-of-consciousness, sprinkled heavily with one word: "apparently."

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Newport Jazz Festival
2:03 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Newport Jazz 2014 In Photos

Cécile McLorin Salvant performed two sets at Newport, including one for a main-stage crowd on the festival's sunny opening day.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 10:50 am

The Newport Jazz Festival turned 60 this year, and expanded to three days to celebrate. Throughout last weekend, more than 45 bands performed at Fort Adams State Park in coastal Rhode Island, playing through abundant sunshine, pouring rain and anything in between.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:30 am
Tue August 5, 2014

Why Imagination Matters in Childhood

Technology can rewire your brain.
Credit digitalbob8/flickr creative commons

What happens in our early childhood has a lot to do with how we develop as humans. Dr. Paul Harris researches the role the imagination plays in helping children grow into healthy adolescents. He says we tend to think of the imagination as something divorced from reality, when in fact it is deeply intertwined with how we determine reality from fantasy.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:26 am
Tue August 5, 2014

The Science of When We Laugh and Why

Credit Chris Huggins/flickr creative commons

Humor, like pornography, is famously difficult to define. We know it when we see it, but is there a way to figure out what we really find funny—and why?

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Television
3:39 am
Tue August 5, 2014

From 'Good Times' To 'Honey Boo Boo': Who Is Poor On TV?

The Evans family from Good Times. Bern Nadette Stanis is second from left.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 10:47 am

Like it or not, television has the power to shape our perceptions of the world. So what do sitcoms, dramas and reality TV say about poor people?

In life and on TV, "poor" is relative. Take breakfast: For Honey Boo Boo's family, it's microwaved sausage and pancake sandwiches; for children in The Wire's Baltimore ghetto, it's a juice box and a bag of chips before school; and on Good Times, set in the Chicago projects back in the 1970s, it was a healthier choice: oatmeal.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:38 am
Mon August 4, 2014

The Scramble: Diversity, Death, and Relatability

William Shakespeare
Credit unbekannt nach einem Gemalde--Carte de Visite / Wikimedia Commons

There are ways today in which our topics are interconnected. Actress and writer Mellini Kantayya, wants to talk about the issues of diversity in casting. One of our other topics involves the fallout from Ira Glass's recent tweet that "Shakespeare sucks." New Yorker writer Rebecca Mead joins us to discuss her article deploring the modern vogue for

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:08 am
Mon August 4, 2014

Mastering the Art of Quitting in Life, Love, and Work

Credit Kate Haskell/flickr creative commons

As we can see from a recent Planet Money story on NPR, millions of people are quitting their jobs each month, and Janet Yellen of The Fed thinks this is a good sign. She says if people are quitting in high numbers, that signals they're sure better jobs are available. In other words, a strong signal for the economy.

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Playtime!
12:07 pm
Sun August 3, 2014

Lego Releases Female Scientists Set, May Appease 7-Year-Old Critic

A product image shows the new Research Institute playset from Lego, which features women in roles as three scientists. In January, the company was criticized by a girl who said all its female characters were "boring."
Lego

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 12:10 pm

Months after a girl took the company to task for its female toy figures, Lego has released the Research Institute, a play set created by a "real-life geophysicist, Ellen Kooijman," the company says.

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History
2:58 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Putting History on the Map

Plan of the Town of New Haven With all the Buildings in 1748.
Drawn by James Wadsworth. Engraved by Thomas Kensett, 1806. The Connecticut Historical Society, 2012.312.1.

All maps are historical.  They represent specific moments in time and very quickly become out of date as new towns are incorporated, new canals or railroads or highways are built.  Some maps, however, are not only historical, but deliberately retrospective.  They represent a time other than the time in which they were made, sometimes a time within the living memory of the mapmaker, sometimes an historic era long past.

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