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Capitol Hill

Republicans Admit Defeat On Health Care Bill: 'Obamacare Is The Law Of The Land'

Updated at 5 p.m. ET House Republicans scrapped a vote on their health care replacement plan on Friday after defections from both the right and center that made it clear the bill would not pass. "Obamacare is the law of the land. It is going to remain the law of the land," House Speaker Paul Ryan admitted shortly after he pulled the bill. "We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future. I don't know how long it's going to take us to replace this law." Ryan may have...

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Law Enforcement

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Rebuffing Hartford, ICE To Continue Identifying As "Police"

A spokesman for the federal agency that oversees immigration enforcement said its agents will continue to refer to themselves as "police," even though Hartford cops and the city's mayor are asking them to stop.

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Tourism

Lawmakers, Businesses Say Worker Visa Restrictions Will Harm Maine Tourism Industry

Lawmakers, Businesses Say Worker Visa Restrictions Will Harm Maine Tourism Industry Summer resorts around the nation are bracing for a tough season — not because the tourists won’t come, but because the workers might not. The reinstatement of a cap on visas for temporary workers has some in the hospitality industry predicting catastrophe.

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Federal Budget

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Connecticut's Grassroots Arts Organizations Count The Cost Of Threatened Federal Cut

One of the federal agencies that would disappear under any implementation of the Trump budget proposal is the National Endowment for the Arts. Federal funding of the arts can be controversial, but in Connecticut, its beneficiaries argue that it’s misunderstood.

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Dave Sizer / Creative Commons

Legislators in Hartford are considering a state-wide "carbon tax" on fossil fuels, which could impact utility customers, car drivers, and businesses in the state.

Violence in Syria took a horrible toll on the country's children last year, the United Nations' children's agency says, with the civil war blamed for killing at least 652 children — 255 of whom were either in or near a school.

In another unsettling trend, 851 children were recruited and used in the conflict in 2016 — double the figure who were recruited in 2015, UNICEF says. The agency says that children's deaths rose 20 percent and injuries rose by 25 percent.

Bill Would Consolidate Local Conn. Health Departments

Mar 13, 2017

The Connecticut Legislature’s Public Health Committee is considering a proposed bill that would consolidate local health departments into regional health districts.

Many people are worried about how potential changes to the federal health law might affect them. But few are as concerned as those with pre-existing health conditions.

This story was updated at 5:45 p.m.

U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara, one of 46 federal prosecutors asked to resign Friday, refused to step down, and was fired.

"I did not resign," Bharara tweeted. "I was fired. Being the US Attorney in SDNY will forever be the greatest honor of my professional life."

A panel of federal judges ruled on Friday that three of Texas' congressional districts are illegal, violating the Constitution and the Voting Rights Act. The panel found that Republicans had used race as a motivating factor in redistricting.

Judges Xavier Rodriguez and Orlando Garcia wrote the court's decision, which comes after a protracted and complex legal battle that began when the new districts were drawn in 2011, following the last census.

The world is facing its greatest humanitarian crisis since 1945, says the United Nations humanitarian coordinator, Stephen O'Brien.

O'Brien told the U.N. Security Council on Friday that more than 20 million people across four countries in Africa and the Middle East are at risk of starvation and famine.

"We stand at a critical point in our history," he said. "Without collective and coordinated global efforts, people will simply starve to death."

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

Lawmakers are struggling with the legal risks the state may encounter in giving its blessing to a third casino in the state. The legislature’s Public Safety Committee heard more than nine hours of testimony in a public hearing Thursday, the majority of it on two bills which would open up commercial gaming in the state in different ways. 

Members of American Indian tribes, indigenous communities and their supporters are demonstrating today in Washington, D.C., calling on the Trump administration to meet with tribal leaders and protesting the construction of the nearly complete Dakota Access Pipeline.

The protest is partly led by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which has been battling the federal government for more than a year over an oil pipeline that members say endangers their drinking water and has destroyed sacred sites in North Dakota.

Even in a bean bag chair, 15-year-old Michelle sits up straight. With her hands on her knees, she looks down at the ground, smiling as she talks about her dreams of being a writer and a military doctor.

As a high school freshman, Michelle is already accomplishing a lot: She's president of the student government association at the International High School at Langley Park. She also writes for the school newspaper and plays basketball. To protect her privacy, we're only using using her first name.

Pages

Youth

Study Suggests Teenagers Do Better If Their City Officials Collaborate

A report released by a children's advocacy group shows that opportunities for young people vary widely between cities and towns across the state.

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Facing Change

What Makes A City A Sanctuary?

Join a community conversation in New Haven, hosted by WNPR and WSHU, and powered by the NENC.

CTCurious

Pick a Question for WNPR to Investigate

Help WNPR find and investigate stories that matter to you.

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More News: Law Enforcement

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Hartford, East Haven Cited By ICE For Non-Cooperation

East Haven and Hartford are the only two Connecticut cities named in the first list issued by the federal government of jurisdictions that limit cooperation with immigration enforcement. But the governor’s office has called into question the credibility of the whole exercise.

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The Beaker

Paying Back Our Debt To The Natural World

An artist suggests using "reciprocal biomimicry" to help stressed species.

More News: Ecology

Anthony Quintano / Creative Commons

Along Highways, Wildlife Appears To Be Breaking Evolutionary Speed Limits

When you think of evolution, you might picture the classic textbook illustration "March of Progress" by Rudolph Zallinger. It shows how, over 25 million years, our human ancestors slowly transform from hunched apes into modern homo sapiens. But now, thanks in part to roads and highways, lots of evolution happens much quicker than that.

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Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut.

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More from WNPR

Refugee Nearly Freezes To Death Fleeing To Canada Via Upstate New York Woods

Many recent immigrants living in the U.S. are scared that their claims for asylum won't have a fair hearing by the Trump administration. Hundreds of those people are fleeing to Canada — and for one man, the journey through the frigid, snowy woods nearly killed him.

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Michelle Jay / NWHL

Women's Hockey Players Speak Out Against Lack Of Pay In USA Hockey

The 2017 Women’s World Hockey Championships are later this month, and the U.S. team has won the last three titles. But its players may not even show up if they aren’t given what they are asking for: fair wages and support from USA Hockey.

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