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Gaming Expansion

MMCT

East Windsor Chosen To Host Third Casino

The partnership of two federally-recognized Indian tribes, which is behind the plan for a commercial casino in Connecticut announced Monday it has chosen East Windsor to host the facility.

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Transportation Fund

Mrschimpf / Creative Commons

As Toll Discussion Continues, Connecticut Special Transportation Fund Faces Insolvency

Connecticut’s special transportation fund could be insolvent within four years if lawmakers don’t take action to secure new revenues. That was the message from the governor’s budget team to members of the legislature’s transportation committee Friday.

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White House

Here's What To Watch For When Trump Addresses Congress

Tuesday night, President Trump will address a joint session of Congress for the first time. After a chaotic first month, it will be a chance for Trump to reset his relationship with voters, who currently give him historically-low approval ratings . It will also be a chance for him to reassure congressional Republicans, whose view of the new administration runs the gamut from optimism to unease. Here are five things to watch for when Trump goes to Capitol Hill on Tuesday. 1. Where we've come...

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Schools

mygueart/iStock / Thinkstock

Audit Suggests Private Special Ed School Got Public Money For Services It Didn't Provide

In 2015, taxpayers spent over $230 million on private special education providers. But a state audit of six schools found that one of them wasn’t providing some of the services it was paid to provide.

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Harriet Jones

Connecticut has around 5,000 manufacturing companies. You may be picturing Pratt & Whitney or Electric Boat, but of course the vast majority of manufacturers are small businesses. WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at the challenges facing those firms in a shrinking industry.

It’s a typically busy day on the shop floor at Prestige Manufacturing in Milford. Ken Dugan has run this business for 27 years.

Abeeeer photo via Flickr Creative Commons

It started with a flub by U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal.  It wasn't a big deal. As one of his spokespeple suggested, even the substitution of the word "era" for "days" would have helped his cause quite a bit. Most other politicians would not have been called on this, but, for Blumenthal, it fits kind of a narrative some people have about him.

Snow Damages Farm Buildings, Some Animals Killed

Feb 9, 2011
Diane Miller

Front Street in Court

Feb 8, 2011
Jeff Cohen/WNPR

The retail development known as Front Street in Hartford is finally built and looking for tenants.  But the project took years to materialize, and now it's in court.

Front Street is a publicly-subsidized development that was geared to attract area people to downtown Hartford and the adjacent Connecticut Convention Center.  Here’s how George Royster puts it. He's an attorney for the state:

“Because people coming to Hartford with no place to go would not be likely to return to the convention center or the hotel if they had no entertainment or retail or places to eat.”

Foxtongue photo via Flickr Creative Commons

What's the impact on the state pension fund when a low-paid legislator moves to a high-paid administration job? We like this piece on "pension spikes" from a policy blog

But maybe it doesn't matter, because we're not really making any serious attempt to fund that whole system.

New Haven Considers Giving Up the Bottle

Feb 8, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

Clean Streets Versus Clean Water

Feb 8, 2011
Monica Brady-Myerov

There has been an historic amount of snowfall around the Northeast.  So far in Hartford, at least 80 inches have fallen.

The extreme snowfall has pitted disposing snow against protecting the water.  Many cities in the Northeast have run out of space to put the snow and are asking for permission to dump it in waterways. As part of a collaboration with northeast stations, Monica Brady-Myerov of WBUR reports.

Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra is taking the city's schools superintendent to task for issuing a series of bonuses to district employees. Segarra says he understands the bonuses total about $2.7 million -- a figure that seemed to frustrated the mayor of this cash-strapped city. In a letter to Superintendent Steven Adamowski, Segarra said he wants to know why these bonuses were issued, what criteria was used in a awarding them, and who approved them.

Nancy Eve Cohen

Harriet Jones

We hear all the time that small businesses are having trouble accessing credit. But sometimes it’s hard to picture what that means both for an individual firm, and for the wider economy. To find out more, WNPR’s Harriet Jones visited a construction company that’s currently rehabbing several old homes in Middletown.

Pages

Police Use of Force

-Benedikt- / Creative Commons

Citing Bias, New Report Calls For Better Data On Police Shootings

A report analyzing nearly 1,000 fatal police shootings that happened in 2015 claims evidence of racial bias. Researchers hope the study will strengthen a call for a national database on police use of force.

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Facing Change

A Look at Muslims in Local Politics

Stories of a changing identity as New England ages and new immigrants arrive.

Connecticurious

versageek / Creative Commons

What Has Sparked Your Curiosity In New Haven?

New Haven is currently home to more than 130,000 people. Initially named Newhaven in 1640, New Haven was Connecticut's co-capital city with Hartford until 1875. The city is the birthplace of former President George W. Bush , the hamburger , and public tree planting .

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Congress

How New England Senators Voted On Trump's Nominees

See the final votes for Trump's Cabinet appointments and other top positions that require Senate confirmation.

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More News: Sober Houses

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

New London Launches Initiative To Make Sober Houses Safer

Cities across the state have struggled to crack down on mismanaged "sober houses" -- residences where people with addiction can pay to live in a drug and alcohol free environment.

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The Beaker

New Satellite Isn't Just For Pretty Pictures

It's poised to change the way we do weather.

Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut.

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More from WNPR

US Department of Education / Creative Commons

Connecticut Educators Weigh Betsy DeVos's Lack of Experience

The selection of billionaire Betsy DeVos to head the U.S. Department of Education has ignited a debate over her lack of experience, and whether it could be good or bad.

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Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Connecticut's First High-Tech Food Waste Recycler Set To Come Online

In 2013, Connecticut's legislature passed a law requiring some businesses to recycle old food, but the rule has a catch: it only applies if a certified recycler is nearby -- and able to take it. The idea was to jumpstart a market for organic recycling in Connecticut. And now, more than three years later, the first of those new recyclers is set to come online.

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