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Connecticut’s Casino Bill Is Signed, But Legal Action Likely To Follow

Governor Dannel Malloy has signed into law a measure that would allow the state’s two federally recognized tribes to build and run a third casino. But the legislation looks certain to attract legal action.

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Law Enforcement

JJ flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/ / Creative Commons

Bridgeport Settles Case That Began With Traffic Stop And Ended With A Search

Bridgeport police have settled a lawsuit brought by a man who was stopped, searched, and ticketed as he drove his boys home from little league and pizza two years ago.

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Congress

Newest Senate Health Care Overhaul Would Increase Uninsured By 22 Million, CBO Says

The Republican scramble to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act has yielded yet another version of a health care overhaul bill, along with yet another score from the Congressional Budget Office — the second analysis from the nonpartisan agency in two days. The CBO released its Thursday analysis hours after Senate Republicans posted a new draft, but the updated budget report had a familiar ring to it. The agency found that, like a prior Senate version , the latest bill would increase the...

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Performance

Cortney Novella / Courtesy New Zenith Theatre

Teen Bullying Bystander Takes Center Stage In Connecticut Performance

A one-woman play opening Friday in downtown Waterbury takes a unique look at the complex, often hidden world of teenage relationships.

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Tony Bacewicz / C-HIT

The scandal around tainted water in Flint, Michigan put the issue of lead poisoning back in the spotlight. Yet lead-based paint remains one of the biggest sources of lead poisoning in the United States, including Connecticut.

The White House announced Tuesday night that President Trump intends to nominate former Gov. Jon Huntsman of Utah to be U.S. ambassador to Russia.

If confirmed, Huntsman would take over a high-profile post amid ongoing probes into Russian meddling in the presidential election and potential ties between Russian officials and the Trump campaign.

President Trump has summoned all Senate Republicans to the White House on Wednesday for a debrief on the state of health care legislation effort in their chamber. Based on the week so far, the meeting may be more like a post mortem.

Investors sent shares of the Internet streaming service Netflix soaring after the company reported that it had beaten forecasts and attracted 5.2 million new subscribers worldwide, increasing its membership to 104 million.

"We also crossed the symbolic milestones of 100 million members and more international than domestic members. It was a good quarter," Netflix wrote in its second-quarter letter to shareholders.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

In addition to a formal meeting between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, earlier this month, the two leaders held a separate, private conversation that has not been previously disclosed, a White House official confirmed on Tuesday.

On July 7, the two leaders held a formal two-hour meeting in which Trump later said that his Russian counterpart had denied any interference in the 2016 election.

Connecticut Senate Republicans / Creative Commons

After weeks of voting, unionized state employees have overwhelmingly approved a labor concessions package that's expected to provide $1.5 billion in savings for the over the next two years. 

Alex Proimos/flickr creative commons

Now that the Senate Republican health care bill has collapsed, the next step may be to vote on an outright repeal -- though that plan also faces political hurdles. But were the repeal to happen, it could have serious consequences for state residents.

State legislatures and city halls are battling over who gets to set the minimum wage, and increasingly, the states are winning.

After dozens of city and county governments voted to raise their local minimum wage ordinances in the last several years, states have been responding by passing laws requiring cities to abide by statewide minimums. So far, 27 states have passed such laws.

The city of Boston is launching a poster campaign to fight Islamophobia by encouraging bystanders to intervene, in a nonconfrontational way, if they witness anti-Muslim harassment.

Starting Monday, the city began installing 50 posters around the city with advice on what to do if you see Islamophobic behavior. The posters recommend sitting by a victim of harassment and talking with them about a neutral subject while ignoring the harasser.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

A new type of energy-efficient construction is drawing attention in the U.S. It’s called “passive housing” -- residences built to achieve ultra-low energy use. It’s so efficient that developers can eliminate central heating systems altogether.

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Frankie Graziano / WNPR

Jonquel Jones Headlines Connecticut Sun In Saturday's WNBA All-Star Game


The Connecticut Sun started the 2017 season with four straight losses. But now, it has the third best record in the WNBA, winning 12 of 17 games since the rough start.

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The Beaker

Lots Of Teeth, And An Amazing Snout

Learn more about great white sharks, the world's largest predatory fish.

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What's Iglesia Ni Cristo, The Church That Bought An Abandoned Connecticut Village?

After years on the market, the abandoned 19th century Connecticut village called Johnsonville was purchased last week. The Philippines-based international church Iglesia Ni Cristo scooped up the property for $1.8 million.

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The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut.

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For Some Hartford Students, Summer School Is About Getting Ahead, Not Catching Up

On a muggy July afternoon, Sheena Harris is teaching about the creolization of African people during the years of slavery.

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