Japan

Obama To Become First Sitting President To Visit Hiroshima

President Obama wraps up a weeklong Asia trip on Friday with a historic visit to Hiroshima, Japan. Obama will be the first sitting president to visit the city synonymous with the deadly nuclear age that began there more than seven decades ago.Obama said he plans to "honor all those who were lost in World War II and reaffirm our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons."Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who will accompany Obama, told reporters the trip "will no doubt create further,...
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Agriculture

To Survive The Bust Cycle, Farmers Go Back To Business-School Basics

After several boom years while the rest of the economy struggled, farming is entering its third year on the bust side of the cycle. Major crop prices are low, while expenses like seed, fertilizer and land remain high. And that means farmers have to get creative to succeed.Modern crop farms in the Corn Belt are sophisticated businesses. So put aside your notions of bucolic red barns surrounded by a few cows. And pull out your best business school vocabulary, because crops are commodities....
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"The way kids speak today, I'm here to tell you." Over the course of history, every aging generation has made that complaint, and it has always turned out to be overblown. That's just as well. If the language really had been deteriorating all this time, we'd all be grunting like bears by now.

Monsanto has rejected a $62 billion takeover bid from Bayer as "incomplete and financially inadequate," but left the door open to further negotiations with the German chemical and pharmaceutical giant.

A judge in Pennsylvania ruled Tuesday that there is sufficient evidence for a sexual assault case against comedian Bill Cosby to move to trial.

The arraignment is set for July, Bobby Allyn of member station WHYY reports.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

When state governments  -- in Maine, Utah, and elsewhere  -- want to learn about ending homelessness, they often look to Connecticut.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Take a trip out to the Housatonic River Valley over the next few days, and if you’re lucky, you might spot a peculiar-looking fungus that’s a tasty trophy for mushroom hunters. 

Updated at 7 a.m. Tuesday

The head of security for the Transportation Security Administration, Kelly Hoggan, has been removed from his position after a hearing about the agency's management, the House Oversight Committee says.

On Tuesday, Secretary for Homeland Security Jeh Johnson confirmed on NPR's Morning Edition that Hoggan is being removed from his post.

U.S. Department of Education

Connecticut's high school graduation rates reached an all time high last year. But a closer look at the figures reveals the state still has some work to do.

Baltimore police Officer Edward Nero has been found not guilty of all four misdemeanor charges he faced in connection with the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Gray died on April 19, 2015, after suffering injuries while in police custody.

Following the ruling, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement, "This is our American system of justice and police officers must be afforded the same justice system as every other citizen in the city, state, and country."

U.S. Navy

Yale University has awarded more than 3,600 degrees during ceremonies at its 315th commencement. Later Monday, the school will confer military commissions to its first group of ROTC graduates in more than four decades.

Diane Orson / WNPR

It's commencement time at colleges and universities nationwide and many graduates are asking themselves: what’s next?

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More News: Jazz Corridor

Steven Sussman

Hartford Pays Homage to Paul Brown, Longtime Pillar of the City’s Jazz Community

If you were selecting a patron saint of jazz for Hartford, a strong contender for canonization would most certainly be Paul Brown, a miracle worker whose countless good works for the music and local jazz musicians over many decades brought great joy, peace and comfort to the capital city.
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WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis. Connecticut is, too -- and WNPR is bringing you stories you won't find anywhere else.

The Beaker

The Fantastic Flehmen Position

Why do some animals make those funny faces, anyway?

Zoned

"Get Your Old Tolling Infrastructure Here"

Massachusetts is phasing out some old tolling plaza gear, and Maine may buy it.

On Course

A Little Rant on Words

English is an odd bird for sure.

More News: Refugees

World Bank Photo Collection / Creative Commons

Gov. Malloy Calls on Obama to Step Up Syrian Refugee Admissions

On Wednesday, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy and 26 other Democratic senators sent a letter to President Obama expressing their deep concern about "the slow pace of admissions for Syrian refugees" and encouraged him to step up the process.
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More from WNPR

Diane Orson / WNPR

After College, Americorps Members Explore a Passion for Public Service in New Haven

It's commencement time at colleges and universities nationwide and many graduates are asking themselves: what’s next?
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