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Immigration

Defiant Homeland Security Secretary Defends Family Separations

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is continuing to defend the Trump administration's controversial "zero tolerance" policy that results in separating children from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally. Nielsen appeared at the White House press briefing on Monday, falsely blaming Democrats for the current crisis and arguing that the impetus is on Congress to pass a law to close legal loopholes. "What has changed is that we no longer exempt entire...

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Updated at 3:57 a.m. ET Saturday

President Trump is enacting a 25 percent tariff on $50 billion of Chinese goods "that contain industrially significant technologies," after months of exchanging threats amid concerns over a potential trade war.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection will begin to collect tariffs on the first $34 billion worth of Chinese imports on July 6. A second set of imports subject to tariffs is still under review.

Courtesy of the artist.

The International Festival of Arts and Ideas in New Haven hosts the premiere of a play called Requiem for an Electric Chair. It’s written and performed by Congolese actor Toto Kisaku who was granted asylum in the U.S. earlier this year. He lives now in Connecticut.

Updated at 12:31 p.m. ET

A federal judge ordered Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, to jail on Friday following allegations by prosecutors that he tampered with witnesses in his case.

"You've abused the trust placed in you six months ago," said Judge Amy Berman Jackson. "I thought about this long and hard, Mr. Manafort. I have no appetite for this."

But Berman Jackson said she could not turn a blind eye to the charges that Manafort had attempted to contact witnesses in his case after he was on bail.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez pleaded guilty last year to two felony corruption charges related to his time in office. Now, Perez is trying to get the city of Hartford to pay his more than $1 million in legal bills.

This week the new Hartford Line commuter rail will link Springfield, Massachusetts, to New Haven, Connecticut, and cities in between. For less than $16, commuters can catch more than 12 trains each day and travel speeds up to 110 miles an hour.

Maloney Hall at Central Connecticut State University, where the school's theater department is located.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Newly released documents reveal that Central Connecticut State University knew about allegations of sexual harassment against one of its professors as far back as 2005. But until recently, CCSU denied that it had records of complaints against Joshua Perlstein.

Updated at 2:37 p.m. ET

New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood is suing the Donald J. Trump Foundation and its board of directors over what she calls "extensive and persistent violations of federal law," her office announced Thursday.

The directors of the foundation named in the suit are President Trump and three of his children: Donald J. Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump and Eric Trump.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A report released by New Haven’s Long Wharf Theatre said the blame for a sexual misconduct scandal at the venue lies with the behavior of a single powerful person. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Offshore wind energy got a big boost this week, when Connecticut officials announced the state’s first-ever procurement of the renewable resource. The move is part of larger offshore wind acquisition, which also involves Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Viburnum dentatum (Arrowwood viburnum) foliage with viburnum leaf beetle larvae
Plant Image Library (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Nature abhors a vacuum. For years, viburnums have been carefree shrubs. They flower consistently each year, some with fragrant blooms, and produce colorful berries in fall for beauty and for the birds. Viburnums have few pests or problems, until now.

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Tom Tyler, director of Connecticut State Parks, inside Sleeping Giant's picnic area. This and other parts of the park were destroyed following severe storms. Tyler said he's "optimistic" parts will re-open before the fall.
Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

After Devastating Storms, Hamden's Sleeping Giant Has 'Very Different Set Of Clothing'

In May, several tornadoes touched down in Connecticut -- destroying homes, uprooting trees and knocking out power to thousands of customers. The weather also devastated several state parks, including the iconic Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden.

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