2016 Election

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut State Legislature Candidate Petit Calls Ad Linking Him to Trump "Reckless"

Republican leaders in Connecticut are condemning a recent digital advertisement linking Republican candidate for state legislature William Petit to presidential candidate Donald Trump.
Read More


Chion Wolf / WNPR

Gov. Malloy Appoints Doug Glanville to Police Council

Retired major league baseball player and Hartford resident Doug Glanville has been appointed to the state panel that sets standards for police officers. This comes two years after Glanville joined the national conversation on race and policing with an article he wrote, "I Was Racially Profiled In My Own Driveway."
Read More


Asylum Hill Congregational Church

What the Rev Believed: Music Makes Us Better

Gary Miller wasn’t primarily a musician; he was a clergyman. As many thousands of you around here know, Gary was the senior minister at Asylum Hill Congregational Church in Hartford for 12 years, beginning in 1999. And he was beloved by that sprawling, interestingly diverse congregation.
Read More


Todd Gray / CPBN


What have you always wondered about? WNPR is taking your questions.
Read More

A federal judge has approved Volkswagen's $14.7 billion settlement over the carmaker's vehicle emissions scandal. The process of compensating affected U.S. car owners is beginning now, with the first buybacks expected to happen within the next few weeks.

Under the terms of the deal, Volkswagen agrees to either buy back or repair vehicles involved in the scandal. That means paying as much as $10.033 billion to owners. In addition, the carmaker has come to an agreement with the United States under which it will pay nearly $5 billion in environmental remediation.

It's a familiar scene for sleep-deprived parents everywhere: They put down the baby in the bassinet to sleep, and those tiny eyes flutter shut. Then they flutter back open and the crying starts. The only thing perhaps more harrowing than those long wakeful nights of a baby's first year is the fear that one day the child won't wake up.

Telecom giant AT&T has reached an $85.4 billion deal to buy media titan Time Warner. The news of this transformational merger has shaken up both industries, raising eyebrows on Wall Street and drawing criticism from lawmakers and even the presidential campaigns.

Nearly half of all American adults have been entered into law enforcement facial recognition databases, according to a recent report from Georgetown University's law school. But there are many problems with the accuracy of the technology that could have an impact on a lot of innocent people.

Jill Kaufman / New England Public Radio

Thirty-seven states now provide some kind of opportunity for all registered voters to cast their ballots before Election Day. Massachusetts is the newest kid on the block with in-person "early voting" that started on Monday, October 24.

Adnan Syed, whose murder conviction was exhaustively explored in the first season of the hit podcast Serial, has asked a judge to release him on bail.

His lawyers said they filed the request in a Maryland court on Monday.

Syed is currently waiting to go to trial — again. This summer, a judge agreed that Syed's defense attorney had mishandled his case during his murder trial in 2000, and granted a new trial.

Rhoda Baer/National Cancer Institute / Creative Commons

A growing number of adolescents in Connecticut and nationwide are protecting themselves from human papillovirus (HPV), new data show, but disparities persist in who is getting vaccinated.

Refugees from around the world continue to find homes in Massachusetts.

The number of Syrian refugees, in particular, has more than doubled here over the last year, despite heated national rhetoric around immigration.

Increased Interest Greets New Refugees

In the basement of the First United Baptist Church in Lowell, newly arrived refugees from Syria and Afghanistan stand shoulder to shoulder with new arrivals from Somalia.

AT&T's proposed $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner is already raising eyebrows among an important constituency: politicians. Reaction to the deal, which was announced Saturday night, has been swift, and skeptical, from both sides of the aisle.

At a rally in Gettysburg, Pa., earlier Saturday, after news of the deal had started to trickle out, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump said it was "a deal we will not approve in my administration because it's too much concentration of power in the hands of too few."

Fuse / Thinkstock

Bloomfield-based health insurer Cigna has agreed to end a policy that required physicians to fill out extra paperwork before they could give patients a drug used to treat opioid addiction. 


2016 Election

Campaign Coverage: 2016 Election

Election Day is almost here. Catch up on the latest in campaign coverage from NPR and WNPR reporters.


As Number Of Syrian Refugees Resettled In Mass. Increases, Community Shows Support

Refugees from around the world continue to find homes in Massachusetts.The number of Syrian refugees, in particular, has more than doubled here over the last year, despite heated national rhetoric around immigration.Increased Interest Greets New RefugeesIn the basement of the First United Baptist Church in Lowell, newly arrived refugees from Syria and Afghanistan stand shoulder to shoulder with new arrivals from Somalia.Theyre all sifting through sweaters, scarves, jackets and hats, looking...
Read More


Ray Hardman / WNPR

Left Handed Pianist's Quest for Perfection After Childhood Tragedy

When the famous Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein lost his right arm in World War I, composers lined up to write works for the pianist featuring the left hand only. One of those works, Maurice Ravel's "Piano Concerto for the Left Hand," will be performed this Sunday by the West Hartford Symphony Orchestra. The soloist for that performance lost the use of his right hand in an unthinkable family tragedy.
Read More

Support WNPR!

We'd like to say thanks with this lovely wreath from L.L. Bean.


More News: Education

What Are The Main Reasons Teachers Call It Quits?

For Ross Roberts, it was a lack of resources that drove him from the classroom. For Danielle Painton, it was too much emphasis on testing. For Sergio Gonzalez, it was a nasty political environment.Welcome to the U.S. teaching force, where the "I'm outta here" rate is an estimated 8 percent a year — twice that of high-performing countries like Finland or Singapore. And that 8 percent is a lot higher than other professions.The teaching force is "a leaky bucket, losing hundreds of thousands of...
Read More

The Beaker

This "Ghost" Hates The Color Green

It's a rare example of a flowering plant that doesn't have any green chlorophyll.

Follow @WNPR on Twitter

Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut. We're focusing this week on special reporting.

More News: Protests

© Council Brandon

Photos: a Visit to the Standing Rock Pipeline Protest Camp in North Dakota

Since April, protesters against an oil pipeline have been camping in tents, tipis, and trailers at a site just across the Missouri River from the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota. For a few days, I stayed at the camp, and met people who gathered there to support the effort.
Read More

More News: Code Switch

Dreadlocks Decision Raises Another Question: What Is Race?

Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of several things, among them race. The law, however, doesn't define "race."It also doesn't say anything about hair.Which brings us to Chastity Jones.In 2012, Jones, who is African-American, was denied a job because she wouldn't cut off her dreadlocks. Jones sued, saying the company was guilty of race-based, disparate treatment. When the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against her...
Read More

More News: Environment

Lori Mack / WNPR

Clean Water Advocate Stops in New Haven During Swim Across Long Island Sound

Clean water advocate Christopher Swain stopped in New Haven during a 130-mile swim from Montauk to New York City.
Read More

WNPR Shows

Call in to talk about where we live and who we are. Our show highlights Connecticut's diverse communities -- and we want to hear your stories.
We feature topics that vary widely from day to day. You'll hear a thoughtful, smart, interesting conversation with amazing guests.
Connecticut's best journalists come out of the political trenches every Wednesday for our weekly news roundtable.
Get ideas for easy cooking and healthful living every week.
Our weekly show is about all of New England, America's oldest place, at a time of change.

More from WNPR

Out Of This World: How Artists Imagine Planets Yet Unseen

When scientists recently announced that they had discovered a new planet orbiting our closest stellar neighbor, Proxima Centuri, they also released an artist's conception of the planet.The picture of a craggy canyon, illuminated by a reddish-orange sunset, looked like an image that could have been taken on Mars by one of NASA's rovers. But the alien scene was actually completely made-up.It's part of an ever-increasing gallery of images depicting real planets beyond our solar system that, in...
Read More