Politics

Political news from WNPR

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Donald Trump has swept the five Republican presidential primaries on Tuesday, including a win in Connecticut.

Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in Connecticut. She also won in Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania. Bernie Sanders won in Rhode Island.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton took definitive steps toward solidifying their respective party's presidential nomination on Tuesday, making their rivals' task to beat them nearly insurmountable.

Trump won all five of the delegate-rich GOP primaries in Connecticut, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Rhode Island. Clinton notched four victories in Maryland, Delaware, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, while Bernie Sanders won the Rhode Island Democratic primary.

During her sophomore year at Southern Connecticut State University, Cinthia Perez and her younger brother dropped out. They decided to work full-time because the family was struggling to pay tuition out-of-pocket.  

Perez said, “It was really hard for my mom, especially. She was like, ‘No, I want you guys to go to college because that would be the main key to help everyone in the family.’ But then we were like, ‘It was either that, or we’re just not going to have any food at home.’”

Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill’s office says members of the public have been asking about the “uncommitted” line on Tuesday's presidential primary ballot.

Merrill says the ballot line allows eligible voters to ask Connecticut delegates to decide for them at the Democratic and Republican Party conventions.

“It’s interesting because that ‘Uncommitted’ line has always been there, but it has never attracted any interest from anyone except this year. 

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

It's Primary Day in Connecticut and I'm excited about it.

For the first time in a long time, Connecticut voters feel they have a say in which candidate moves on to the general election in November, most of whom spent time speaking to voters in Connecticut this weekend.

WNPR

As presidential candidates crisscross the United States, they have to learn how to win in open primaries, closed primaries, and caucuses. If they want their party's nomination, they need support from average voters and the more high-profile superdelegates. Candidates also must navigate the unique and varying rules of each state's contest. We haven't even gotten to the general election and the electoral college rules!

As Primary Ballots Are Cast, Connecticut Voters Weigh in

Apr 26, 2016
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut Democrats and Republicans are voting on Tuesday in the state’s primaries. 

Five delegate-rich states on the East Coast will vote Tuesday: Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Call it the "Acela Primary" for the train that runs through those states.

There's a lot at stake. Here are four things we're watching:

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Democratic Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders rallied Monday morning by the Hartford riverfront. It was the second of two Connecticut campaign stops after speaking in New Haven Sunday night in front of 14,000 spectators. 

Hillary Clinton was in Central Falls Saturday to campaign in advance of Tuesday’s primary election. 

Rhode Island’s Democractic leadership turned out in force to welcome Clinton, including the state’s congressional delegation and Gov. Gina Raimondo.

Republican presidential candidate John Kasich addressed a crowd at Bryant University Saturday, just a few days before Rhode Island's presidential primary.

Speaking on a range of issues, the Ohio governor discussed his childhood in Pennsylvania coal country, his concerns about the national debt, and his belief that government should ease regulation to help small business owners.

"Our job is not to play politics, do focus groups, worry about re-election," Kasich said. "The fundamental problem we’ve had in America is our leadership has been very poor."

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders brought his insurgent Democratic presidential primary campaign to Rhode Island Sunday, giving an impassioned speech to 7,000 cheering supporters at a sun-dappled Temple to Music at Roger Williams Park in Providence.

Four presidential candidates were in Connecticut over the weekend in an effort to rally support for their candidacies ahead of the state’s Democratic and Republican primaries tomorrow.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, an Independent who is seeking the Democratic Party presidential nomination, had the weekend’s largest rally.

Citizens4taxjustice / Creative Commons

The effect of a declining middle class is everywhere -- the medically uninsured or underinsured, the heroin epidemic, declining life expectancy for middle-aged white men, flat wages, weakened unions -- the list goes on and on.

Mamata.mulay / Creative Commons

Democratic legislative leaders are hoping to vote in the coming days on a revised Connecticut budget for next fiscal year, which is about $922 million in deficit. 

Deputy Chief Brian J. Foley, twitter feed @ltfoley

For a state that doesn't usually get much attention from presidential candidates, we’ve had a barrage of visits from Democrats and Republicans in the last few weeks, talking about issues that resonate with voters here: guns. Like Hillary Clinton, who brought Sandy Hook families and community members together for a forum in downtown Hartford. 

Hundreds rallied for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Waterbury and Bridgeport, Connecticut, today.

Ohio Governor John Kasich was in Connecticut again Friday, trying to reassure his supporters that he still has a chance to win the presidential nomination at the Republican convention in Cleveland.

The primary elections across five states Tuesday could decide the nominations of both parties.

That's especially true on the Democratic side. (For the Republicans, scroll down.) Bernie Sanders has come a long way, but the Vermont independent is running out of friendly states. Tuesday is no different, as all but one of the contests (Rhode Island) in these Northeast states are closed primaries.

Erik (HASH) Hersman / Creative Commons

Presidential candidates court Connecticut voters this weekend ahead of Tuesday's presidential primary. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The current legislative impasse over the state budget is less between political parties and more between branches of government. Gov. Dannel Malloy received plenty of criticism from members of his own party after releasing his revised budget proposal that makes widespread cuts to services and aid. Connecticut also hasn't completely put the lid on this year's budget.

This hour, we're joined in-studio by the governor to share his views on what's happening in the state capitol and how these debates can be resolved.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Layoffs are continuing in Connecticut state government, with 166 employees at the Department of Correction receiving pink slips.

Ines Hegedus-Garcia / Creative Commons

The city of Hartford and Trinity College have resolved a legal dispute over whether the school should be allowed to use artificial turf for new athletic fields. The move avoids a fight between a new administration and one of the city's biggest stakeholders.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was in Hartford on Thursday, speaking alongside family members of victims of gun violence. 

Connecticut Budget Process Mired in Political Gridlock

Apr 21, 2016
JasonParis. / Creative Commons

With less than two weeks left in the legislative session, Governor Dannel Malloy’s new budget proposal has spurred political uproar between him and Democratic leaders -- specifically Democratic Speaker of the House Brendan Sharkey who called the revision a "personal hit list."

David DesRoches / WNPR

Chelsea Clinton stopped off in Hartford on Wednesday to raise funds for her mother, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. 

Tucker Ives / WNPR

Just a few weeks ago, Connecticut started to write-off its importance in the presidential nomination process. But then Bernie Sanders picked up steam and Donald Trump's campaign faltered. With less than a week before Connecticut residents cast their ballots, the candidates are making public stops across the state. Trump was in Hartford last week, and Hillary Clinton and John Kasich have visits scheduled this week.

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Connecticut Democrats and Republicans vote for their party's nominee next week and a new Quinnipiac University poll shows Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump with statewide leads.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton notched important wins in their respective presidential primaries in their home state of New York on Tuesday night, helping both in their efforts to clinch their party's White House nomination.

In the Republican race, the billionaire real estate mogul sealed a massive victory over his two remaining rivals, sweeping at least 89 of the 95 delegates up for grabs.

The Associated Press reports:

Donald Trump is now the only Republican candidate with any chance of clinching the nomination before the convention.

Following widespread irregularities at polls in Brooklyn Tuesday, New York City officials are calling for major reforms at the Board of Elections.

The problem was first identified in a an analysis of state voter enrollment statistics by WNYC's Brigid Bergin. The Board of Elections then confirmed that more than 120,000 voters have been dropped from the rolls in Brooklyn alone since November.

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