Politics

Political news from WNPR

Donald Trump made a drastic call on Monday for "a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country's representatives can figure out what is going on."

Trump's call comes one day after President Obama's address from the Oval Office in the aftermath of the San Bernardino, Calif., shootings that were carried out by an apparently self-radicalized married couple. The male shooter was an American citizen, born in the United States. His wife was born in Pakistan but was in the U.S. legally on a visa for fiancees.

sari_dennise / Creative Commons

President Barack Obama is urging Congress to control U.S. gun purchases, including voting for a ban on the sale of guns to people on the terror watch list. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Senate Majority Leader Bob Duff said there's "general agreement on the parameters" of a deal to cover Connecticut's current budget shortfall. 

Pete Souza / White House

Dozens of reporters rushed the apartment of the San Bernardino shooters on Friday. They live-streamed their tour through the home for 15 minutes, holding up everyday items that included personal photographs and private documents.

They were roundly condemned on social media and by neighbors concerned by the frenzy. Where is the line between what people need to know and voyeurism? How does the drive for speed and ratings affect journalistic integrity?

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The Supreme Court has declined a review of the ability of cities and states to ban semiautomatic weapons and large-capacity magazines, leaving in place lower court rulings like those affecting Connecticut.

The United States Department of Justice will investigate whether the Chicago Police Department has systematically violated the civil rights of citizens when it uses force and deadly force.

In a press conference on Monday, Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced that her department was launching a so-called "pattern or practice" investigation after it conducted a preliminary review.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The federal criminal trial of a former insurance executive who brought unwanted attention to Hartford City Hall begins this week. 

Dealing a big blow to President Nicolas Maduro's Socialist leadership, Venezuelan voters handed a majority of congressional seats to a coalition of opposition parties.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports the opposition gains control of congress for the first time since Hugo Chávez ushered in victory for the leftist movement in 1999. She filed this report for our Newcast unit:

President Obama used a rare Oval Office address Sunday evening to speak to a worried nation about the evolving threat of terrorism and the growing influence of the Islamic State.

One of the biggest messages the president tried to communicate to the American people was that a fear of terrorist attacks must not translate into a fear of all Muslims and spark unnecessary targeting. But judging by the immediate response after the speech, Obama did little to bridge the partisan divide.

In a prime-time speech from the Oval Office Sunday night, Obama said that the United States would defeat the threat of terrorism — without compromising American values.

Obama began his third Oval Office address by remembering the 14 Americans who died in Wednesday's attack in San Bernardino, California.

In a prime-time speech from the Oval Office, President Obama is scheduled to address the threat of terrorism facing the United States.

Obama will update the country on the investigation into the mass shooting in San Bernardino and also talk about the United States' war against the Islamic State.

President Obama will deliver an Oval Office address on Sunday evening, discussing the San Bernardino attack and the broader issue of terrorism.

The mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., which killed 14 people earlier this week, is currently being investigated by the FBI as an act of terror. The president will provide an update on the ongoing investigation, the White House says.

Inevitably, as news breaks of yet another international or domestic event — an explosion in Texas, a train derailment outside Philadelphia, a Molotov cocktail thrown into a nightclub in Egypt, a shooting in Colorado or California — there's one question never far from Americans' lips: "Is it terrorism?"

Even many who don't want to generalize wonder, "What do we know about the shooter — was he or she Muslim?"

After news emerged Friday that the female shooter in a deadly attack in California had pledged allegiance to ISIS, the extremist group issued a radio bulletin calling Tashfeen Malik and her husband Syed Rizwan Farook "supporters." The group did not claim to have planned or ordered the attack.

Arasmus Photo / Creative Commons

Sanctuary cities have become a focus in the national debate on immigration reform. But what are they? Where are they? And how do they affect communities around the country? 

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Governor Dannel Malloy is calling Connecticut lawmakers back to the Capitol for a special legislative session on the state budget shortfall, even though a bipartisan agreement hasn't been reached. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford Mayor-elect Luke Bronin says he's going to take a pass on the traditional inaugural ball, and he'll just take the oath of office in the early morning hours of 2016.

Saying America's military must draw from "the broadest possible pool of talent," Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Thursday that women in the U.S. military — including the Army and Marines — can now serve in combat posts.

The formal process to open combat jobs to women began in January of 2013; in finishing that process, Carter acknowledged that in recent years, U.S. women have fought — and sometimes given their lives — in combat posts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

As yet another mass shooting claimed the lives of 14 people Wednesday in San Bernardino, Calif., a familiar refrain echoed from the lips of politicians: Pray.

But for many fed up with the now seemingly routine shootings and the resulting inaction from each over how to stop another tragedy, pleas to God weren't enough anymore.

Speaking one day after at least 14 people died in a mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., President Obama said the investigation into the attack is now in the hands of the FBI — and warned that it may take some time to find answers.

Obama began his remarks from the Oval Office by noting that at this stage in the investigation, the two shooters' motivations are not known.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel appears to be reversing course and says he now "welcomes" a Justice Department investigation in "systemic issues embedded" in the city's police department.

The mayor's office Thursday morning released a statement seeking to "clarify" Emanuel's comments Wednesday, in which he suggested a federal civil rights pattern-and-practice investigation "in my view, would be misguided."

CAFNR / Creative Commons flickr.com/photos/cafnr/14643509606/

A Hearst Media investigation has found that in the past two years, the Newtown-based National Shooting Sports Foundation, located just a few miles away from Sandy Hook Elementary School, outspent the National Rifle Association on lobbying to prevent expanded background checks and protect immunity for gun manufacturers.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

On Monday, the first police officer went to trial for the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. Just a few days earlier, video was released of a white police officer in Chicago shooting a black man 16 times.

This hour, we talk about race and racism with three people including Hartford resident Gareth Weston, a black man whose own daughter thought he looked like a "bad guy" when wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt. 

Chris Christie may be running from behind in a crowded Republican presidential field, but he’s running hard. Tuesday was his 50th day of campaigning in New Hampshire. He’s made more visits to the state than any other candidate.

Now Christie is hoping a key endorsement this week, as well as his experience as governor of New Jersey, will help energize his New Hampshire campaign.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Former Bridgeport mayor and convicted felon Joe Ganim is once again mayor of Bridgeport. 

The British Parliament has begun a daylong debate over whether to grant the government authority to conduct airstrikes against ISIS in Syria.

The U.K. is already conducting strikes against ISIS in Iraq.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Lawmakers are gearing up for a special session later this month as leaders continue to discuss a new budget agreement. The whole process is plagued by uncertainty though. How much is the budget shortfall? What corporations will have a presence in the state? Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will have its own budget talk.

Puerto Rico has managed to make a payment due today on its bond debt, but officials are warning that the commonwealth's fiscal position remains tenuous.

As a result, the government will have to pay for essential government services by using money budgeted for upcoming debt payments, said Melba Acosta Febo, president of the Government Development Bank for Puerto Rico, in a statement. She added:

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Pentagon has announced it will send additional Special Operations forces to Iraq and Syria to help defeat the so-called Islamic State. The news shouldn't be a surprise according to Connecticut's U.S. Senator Chris Murphy, but he said it is concerning.

Amid growing criticism, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has dismissed police Superintendent Garry McCarthy.

After announcing that he was appointing a task force to look at police accountability, Emanuel said that "public trust" in the city's police force has been "shaken" and "eroded" and so he had asked McCarthy to resign.

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