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Political news from WNPR

Updated 12:01 p.m. ET Tuesday, with additional details.

President-elect Donald Trump invited a large group of television news anchors and executives from the nation's leading networks on Monday to reset a relationship that had badly frayed during a contentious campaign.

First, Trump gave them a piece of his mind. He castigated the networks for what he said was unfair coverage.

Democracy Chronicles / Flickr

Why do we vote the way we do? The easy answer, of course, is that we pick the politician whose values, beliefs and opinions most closely resemble our own. But while that does play a part, there are other, less obvious influences as well.

During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump promised the biggest tax cut since Ronald Reagan's conservative revolution swept into Washington in the 1980s.

A big part of that tax cut would go to corporations. The president-elect says that will fuel investment and growth. Skeptics say the plan would explode the federal budget deficit.

Top business tax rate slashed

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani remains one of the leading contenders for secretary of state in the Trump administration. Foreign policy is not an official part of the mayor's job. But there were a few times when Mayor Giuliani clashed with visiting diplomats and foreign heads of state.

Before Rudy Giuliani was America's Mayor, he was the mayor of New York. Part of the job is to make sure parking tickets get paid, and some of the biggest parking scofflaws in town were the visiting diplomats at the United Nations — some of whom owed tens of thousands of dollars.

Ted Eytan / Creative Commons

Just 16 days after a long, bitter, and contentious presidential election ended, families come together for Thanksgiving.

Guillaume Flament / flickr creative commons

Colin is back, and we've got some questions, and we're guessing you do too.

Rarely has a single door attracted so much media attention.

All weekend, cameras have been trained on the wood-paneled door of the clubhouse at the Trump International Golf Club in Bedminster Township, N.J., as the journalists behind them sought to suss out clues to the next step in President-elect Donald Trump's transition efforts. And on Sunday, those clues trickled in with each new arrival.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

So-called “sanctuary cities” across the country are telling President-elect Donald Trump that they won't let local police act like federal immigration enforcers, even if their funding is threatened. 

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

President-elect Donald Trump announced his selections today for three key posts: Michael Flynn for national security adviser, Sen. Jeff Sessions for attorney general and Rep. Mike Pompeo for CIA director.

Trump's selections signal that he is prioritizing loyalty as he chooses nominees for top posts — turning to people who were early and outspoken supporters of his campaign.

In the wake of his party's significant losses across the Rust Belt in last week's elections, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan is stepping up to challenge Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi's nearly 14-year grip on the House Democratic caucus.

Ryan, a a seven-term lawmaker who represents Youngstown, wrote to his colleagues that "Democrats must not let this opportunity for change pass by without a fight." He noted that the party has hemorrhaged over 60 House seats in the past six years and has only been in the majority for two terms in the past 18 years.

Every four years, the Electoral College creeps back into the lives of American voters. In some presidential elections, the strange, indirect system used to select the next U.S. president can feel like a formality that doesn't seem to matter much.

In other elections, it matters very much indeed. This is one of those years.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Two new reports give more information about the potential budget difficulties ahead for the state of Connecticut. 

President-elect Donald Trump has made it clear that Vice President-elect Mike Pence will have a major role in governing. He recently tapped Pence to take over leadership of his transition planning from New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, and Pence spent the day Tuesday at Trump Tower as the two men select key members of their administration.

Chuck Kennedy / White House

This week, the country is settling into the idea of what a Trump presidency might look like. The President-elect has dialed back his rhetoric on Obamacare and NATO. He's hired a transition team chock-full of family members, political insiders, and most controversially a person criticized from both the right and the left as "the modern face of racism." The new head of the EPA may well be a climate change denier. And he's taken phone calls with world leaders, including Putin

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut’s two United States Senators said they will give a fair hearing to any nominee Donald Trump may send before them for the Supreme Court. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

One week has passed since Republican Donald Trump was elected to become the 45th president of the United States. In that time, thousands of immigrants and activists have come together to protest the new President-elect, citing, among other things, Trump's proposals on immigration. 

Donald Trump's election has sent tremors through America's refugee advocate community, and caused fear and uncertainty among the most recently resettled refugees, the Syrians. They listened with alarm as candidate Trump called them "terrorists" and blamed them, incorrectly, for violent attacks in America.

Advisers to President-elect Donald Trump are considering whether to retain FBI Director James Comey after the agency became an issue in one of the most divisive campaigns in modern history, three sources told NPR.

Comey has nearly seven years left to serve in his 10-year term. The FBI director's position extends beyond the term of any single president to help insulate the bureau from political forces as it pursues sensitive criminal and national security investigations.

Refugee resettlement organizations crossed their fingers after this week's election. President-elect Trump has threatened to ban refugees, particularly Muslims. Meanwhile Connecticut uses a unique model that places refugees in individual communities. They would like the model to continue and even grow. The town of Wilton is a good place to see it in action.

Less than a week after his election, Donald Trump has begun to fill out the team he plans to bring with him to the White House. The president-elect announced Sunday that he has selected Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus to serve as chief of staff in his incoming administration.

In the same announcement, Priebus' appointment shared top billing with the news that Trump campaign CEO Stephen K. Bannon will serve as chief strategist and senior counselor to the president.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

He'll build a border wall and he'll deport millions of people who are in the U.S. illegally, President-elect Donald Trump says, promising to keep his campaign pledges on immigration in his first prolonged interview since winning the White House.

Donald Trump has proposed a very detailed tax plan — but his statements on the campaign trail don't always match what his proposal would really do.

For instance, at a rally in Scranton, Pa., Trump promised to "massively cut taxes for the middle class, the forgotten people, the forgotten men and women of this country, who built our country." During a town hall meeting on NBC's Today show, he said he believes in raising taxes on the wealthy.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Thousands took to the streets this week in cities across the nation to protest against President-elect Donald Trump. On Thursday, more than 300 people marched through the streets of downtown New Haven in a demonstration organized by immigrant rights group Unidad Latina en Acción. 

Brett Levin / Creative Commons

Voters in Massachusetts approved the recreational use of marijuana starting in 2018. It's a measure some Connecticut legislators have pushed for in the past without success. But now proponents think the tide might be changing in Connecticut. 

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