Politics

Political news from WNPR

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A day after the owner of the Hartford Yard Goats publicly offered to loan the city the money it needs to complete its stalled baseball stadium, Mayor Luke Bronin has declined to take him up on it. 

Mark Nozell, Creative Commons

Listen Wednesday at 9 a.m. 

This hour, we’re gonna try really hard to not say one word. That word starts with a T, and rhymes with “thump.” 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Under intense pressure from Minor League Baseball, the owner of the Hartford Yard Goats said he has offered to loan the city the money it needs to finish Dunkin' Donuts Park in order to make sure ball is played in 2017. 

Loren Kerns / Creative Commons

There's lots to talk about in the news right now -- including the presidential election that just keeps giving. Giving stress, giving insults, giving the non-stop news cycle a lot to talk about. 

Months after the Obama administration advised school districts that transgender students should be given access to bathrooms based on their gender identity, a federal judge in Texas has blocked the guidance from going into effect — for now.

U.S. District Judge Reed O'Connor has granted a preliminary, nationwide injunction in response to a lawsuit filed by Texas and a number of other states.

Is Donald Trump considering wavering on a key campaign promise?

That's what several news reports published over the weekend suggest. And while the Trump campaign issued a statement denying any shift on immigration policy, top surrogates and campaign operatives hinted that a change just might be on its way.

The issue: what to do with the estimated 11 million immigrants already living in the United States illegally.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's been 25 years since the state of Connecticut began to levy an income tax. Facing a huge deficit and a partial government shutdown, the legislature agreed in special session to institute the controversial measure on August 21, 1991. Governor Lowell Weicker signed it into law the next day. 

Uma Ramiah / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy’s budget office says it's releasing funds to several state watchdog agencies after igniting a storm of controversy by withholding the cash. 

Just months after Paul Manafort was promoted to bring some structure to and scale up Donald Trump's presidential bid, the Washington insider has resigned from the campaign.

In a statement Friday morning, Trump said that Manafort offered his resignation. The candidate said he is "very appreciative for his great work in helping to get us where we are today, and in particular his work guiding us through the delegate and convention process."

"Paul is a true professional and I wish him the greatest success," Trump continued.

Last month, when Wikileaks published 20,000 emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee, cyber-security experts quickly said that the hack bore a Russian fingerprint.

Russia denies that it is trying to meddle in the U.S. presidential election. But Mark Galeotti, who follows cyber-crime for the Institute for International Relations in Prague, says worldwide research points in the Russians' direction.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy’s decision to cut funds to several state watchdog agencies may soon be under legal review. 

U.S. Justice Department officials plan to phase out their use of private prisons to house federal inmates, reasoning that the contract facilities offer few benefits for public safety or taxpayers.

In making the decision, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates cited new findings by the Justice Department's inspector general, who concluded earlier this month that a pool of 14 privately contracted prisons reported more incidents of inmate contraband, higher rates of assaults and more uses of force than facilities run by the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

alancleaver_2000 / Creative Commons

Twenty-five years after it was first levied, what has the income tax done for Connecticut? This hour, we take a deeper look at this controversial tax -- including its impact on our state's economic and fiscal well-being.

Surrounded by shouting, he's completely silent.

The child is small, alone, covered in blood and dust, dropped in the back of an ambulance with his feet dangling off the edge of a too-big chair.

He doesn't cry or speak. His face is stunned and dazed, but not surprised. He wipes his hand over his wounded face, looks at the blood, wipes it off on the chair.

It's a line that draws thunderous applause at Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's campaign rallies, one that can sometimes even bring the crowd to its feet: Let's bring back America's lost manufacturing jobs.

And is there any question why? The United States has lost nearly 5 million manufacturing jobs since 2000 alone, hollowing out factory towns all over the country and leaving countless working-class Americans struggling.

Marcie Casas / Creative Commons

A state senator is being investigated in Connecticut. That doesn’t sound surprising actually. This time, it’s about adding constituents who contacted his office about constituent stuff to political fundraising lists. Even in Connecticut that’s a no-no! 

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is shaking up his campaign staff, after a series of missteps that led to slumping poll numbers.

Trump has tapped Stephen Bannon of Breitbart News to serve as chief executive of the campaign. Pollster Kellyanne Conway was promoted to campaign manager. Paul Manafort will stay on as Trump's campaign chairman. The Wall Street Journal first reported the news.

Melissa Bailey / New Haven Independent

New Haven Police Chief Dean Esserman’s three week disciplinary leave ended Monday. But he’s still not back on the job.

The chairman of Donald Trump's presidential campaign says he never received a single off-the-books cash payment for political work in Ukraine.

The statement from campaign chairman Paul Manafort comes after The New York Times reported that his name appears in a so-called "black ledger" recording under-the-table payments made by the political party of Ukraine's former pro-Russian president, Viktor Yanukovych.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy is seeking a new commissioner for the Office of Early Childhood. Myra Jones-Taylor has announced  her resignation, effective immediately.

Tucker Ives / WNPR

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump spoke in Connecticut Saturday for the first time since officially winning his party's nomination.

In the opening ceremony of Rio's Olympic Games, Brazil's favelas, or shantytowns, were showcased as the birthplace of a lot of Brazil's culture.

That was showbiz. In three of the most iconic communities, the reality of how these Olympics are affecting favela residents is more complicated.

Brazil is one of the most unequal countries in the world. In Rio, at least 25 percent of the population lives in impoverished communities.

Take Santa Marta. Perched above Rio's expensive South Zone, it's the city's most internationally famous favela.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has released a second list of economic advisers in less than a week, and this time the names are almost all women.

The advisers include several longtime GOP fundraisers, including Diane Hendricks, co-founder and chairman of ABC Supply in Wisconsin, who was called "America's richest self-made woman" by Forbes magazine.

Sean McMenemy / Creative Commons

Most people know that at the DMV you can register your car, get new license plates and obtain a driver’s license. But did you know you can register to vote? Beginning this week, if you’re renewing your license or getting a Connecticut issued ID, you’ll be asked if you want to register to vote at the same time.

This hour, we talk with Secretary of State Denise Merrill about this new voter registration system. We also ask her about the local primaries that took place on Tuesday, and the latest Election Performance Index from the Pew Charitable Trust that ranked Connecticut fifth in the nation.

Editor's note: NPR fact-checked Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's economic speech on Monday.

Trump delivered an address Monday to the Detroit Economic Club, outlining a plan to cut taxes and get rid of regulations. Today was Hillary Clinton's turn, where she argued that her plan would boost the middle class while Trump's plan "would give trillions in tax cuts to big corporations, millionaires, and Wall Street money managers."

Editor's note: NPR fact-checked Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's economic speech on Monday.

Trump delivered an address Monday to the Detroit Economic Club, outlining a plan to cut taxes and get rid of regulations. Today was Hillary Clinton's turn, where she argued that her plan would boost the middle class while Trump's plan "would give trillions in tax cuts to big corporations, millionaires, and Wall Street money managers."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Two of Connecticut's more conservative voices formerly in Congress announced on Wednesday that they will vote for Hillary Clinton in the general election.

Chion Wolf

A couple of familiar names won’t be returning to the General Assembly this fall, after being toppled in primary contests Tuesday. 

Voters in the Democratic primary delivered an electoral mandate on Tuesday. Now, Sue Minter will try to use it to become Vermont’s first female governor in 25 years.

Lt. Gov. Phil Scott has won a decisive victory over businessman Bruce Lisman to win the Republican gubernatorial primary. Scott says his election shows that negative campaigning does not work in Vermont.

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