Political news from WNPR

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie knew about a road study that would create a traffic nightmare — and used the advance notice to ask about his office's relationship with the local mayor, former top aide Bridget Kelly testified in court Friday. Kelly also said that Christie had cursed and thrown a water bottle at her.

ISIS fighters launched attacks on police Friday in the city of Kirkuk, as Iraqi security forces continued a massive military offensive to try to pry Mosul, one of Iraq's largest cities, from the militant group.

"The fighters struck [Kirkuk] before dawn, with suicide bombers hitting four police stations and gunmen killing police," NPR's Alice Fordham reports from Irbil, Iraq, though the number of casualties wasn't immediately clear. "A curfew is imposed in Kirkuk, but eyewitnesses say fighting continues."

South Africa has decided to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, after previously ignoring an ICC arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir.

Reuters and The Associated Press both say they have seen a document, signed by South Africa's foreign minister, declaring the country's intent to withdraw. The AP reports that legislation to finalize the move has to pass South Africa's parliament, but notes that passage of such a bill is likely.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin is continuing his effort to highlight the capital city's structural financial problems. And he's giving state lawmakers a few suggestions on how to fix them. 

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

Presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump met in Las Vegas last night for their third and final debate before the November 8 election. 

"I will look at it at the time. I'm not looking at anything now...I'll keep you in suspense. Okay?" This was Donald Trump's response to Chris Wallace asking if he would honor the outcome of the election. His answer is unprecedented in the history of American politics. His answer dismisses the privilege Americans enjoy by the seemingly benign transfer of power that occurs with each presidential election. Stop for a moment and think about the violence in countries where people die to vote or where their vote doesn't matter because a leader won't step down. 

BrianSwan / Creative Commons

Connecticut is home to some of the wealthiest Americans in the country, and yet its cities are among the nation’s poorest. Some say the first step to ending this inequality is to spread the wealth from thriving suburban areas to struggling urban areas.

This hour, we talk regionalization – will Connecticut ever embrace it as the state struggles with constant deficits?

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.

He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.

He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was overall more cordial and more policy-focused than their nasty second debate faceoff. But the stunning moment that will stand out is the GOP nominee's statement that he won't necessarily accept the results of the election on Nov. 8.

"I will tell you at the time," Trump said in a shocking statement that signals a break from the traditional transfer of power. "I will keep you in suspense."

Courtesy NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton faced off in the third and final presidential debate of the campaign on Wednesday night. The debate took place at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas.

Donald Trump is no longer laughing at Saturday Night Live, which is part of the media and the political establishment that he says have stacked the election against him. At a rally in Pennsylvania, he told his supporters to go to polling places on Election Day to make sure they're "on the up and up" -- which concerned civil rights groups and others citing illegal voter intimidation.  

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Things may be looking up for Hartford’s Dunkin’ Donuts Park, as the city and the insurance company for the developer have finally signed an agreement that should get construction at the stalled baseball stadium going again.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

One of Connecticut’s top Democrats has fired a shot across the bows of the state’s largest business organization.

The battle for the ISIS-held city of Mosul, now in its second day, is expected to drag on for weeks or months. As Kurdish and Iraqi forces approach the city, aid groups in the region are preparing for a humanitarian crisis.

Fighting has lulled in some areas, but is continuing in others, and airstrikes by the U.S.-led coalition continue, NPR's Alice Fordham reports from Kalak, Iraq.

"The Iraqi army is fighting its way toward the city from the south: a spokesman said they are facing resistance but moving," Alice says.

Claims by one side — so far without evidence — that the coming presidential election will somehow be "rigged" are being echoed at campaign rallies and in one new poll of voters.

Donald Trump has questioned the integrity of the election, and there's been talk of the race for the Democratic nomination having been rigged at the expense of candidate Bernie Sanders.

The mayor of Connecticut’s largest city says he balanced the city’s budget within the first six months of his term. Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim says he did this by selling land and collecting overdue taxes, among other things.

Ganim says he inherited a $20 million budget deficit from his predecessor Bill Finch. Ganim is a former mayor and ex-convict. He defeated Finch in a heated primary last year. Av Harris, Ganim’s spokesperson, alleges Finch didn’t tell Ganim about the deficit.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

See, we were supposed to send a whole team of people to the first presidential debate on Long Island. We were supposed to do an episode of The Colin McEnroe Show from Hofstra.

Mike Licht / Creative Commons

Donald Trump spent the recent days creating an alternate reality filled with 'global conspiracies' against him he claims are led by Hillary Clinton and the global elite. This is in response to several women who came forward last week to accuse Donald Trump of sexually harassing and/or assaulting them after a 2005 tape was released on which Trump was bragging about how easy it was for him to "grab" women as he pleased. 

Ned Gerard / AP

A Connecticut judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by families of the victims in the Newtown school shooting. They filed a suit against the manufacturer of the rifle used in the massacre.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Election Day is just around the corner, which means it’s almost time to cast your vote in Connecticut's U.S. Senate race. Last month, Republican candidate Dan Carter stopped by for an in-depth look at his campaign. 

This hour, it's Democratic incumbent Richard Blumenthal's turn to answer our questions and hear from you. As always, we take your calls, tweets, and emails.  

The whirling dervish that is Donald J. Trump spun ever-faster on Thursday, shredding almost everything in his range of vision — Hillary Clinton, his fellow Republicans who fail to support him unequivocally, the growing chorus of women accusing him of sexual misconduct, and especially the press.

Updated Oct. 20 at 2:34 p.m. to include the Trump campaign's response to Karena Virginia's allegations.

The allegations against Donald Trump of inappropriate sexual behavior had quieted down, but on Thursday morning, another woman spoke up. The latest accuser, Karena Virginia, held a Thursday press conference with attorney Gloria Allred, in which Virginia alleged that Trump groped her in 1998.

Trump has thus far denied any of the incidents and has also threatened to sue the New York Times, which reported two of the most recent accusations.

Charles Hutchins / Flickr Creative Commons

I wasn't sure anyone would show up for a live, on-stage discussion about this year's election. I mean, no one's starving for content about this. We're all bombarded. But show up, they did! We got about 200 people and packed the amphitheater, and I think that says something about our  basic human need to be together as bodies, talking and relating in a very humanly embodied way, especially in these troubling days. I should tell you that we taped this right before the hot mic incident and all that followed. It was a more innocent time. But everything we said still holds.

Daniel Lobo / Creative Commons

Since March, several infants in Connecticut have died at home daycares – resulting in police investigations and heightened concern among parents.

This hour, we talk about child care – many of us rely on it, how do we keep it safe?

After a video surfaced last week showing Donald Trump boasting in 2005 how he would kiss and grope women without consent, the GOP nominee insisted in Sunday's presidential debate that it was just "locker room talk" and, pressed repeatedly by CNN's Anderson Cooper, finally said that he had never actually taken the action he described.