politicians

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The race for the Whitehouse is on and politicians from around the country are lining up for a shot at the presidency. As of this month, there are eight current or former governors seeking their party's nomination. While Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy is not one of them, he's certainly not shy about discussing those that are.

Cloe Poisson / Courtesy of The Hartford Courant

After coming up short for the Democratic endorsement, Bridgeport mayoral candidate Joe Ganim is focused on the September primary. 

Cloe Poisson / Courtesy of The Hartford Courant

No one can argue the charisma of former Bridgeport mayor Joe Ganim. He served five terms as a beloved leader in a city long plagued by  crime, poverty, and corruption, much of the corruption under the Ganim administration.

The 2016 presidential election is a big birthday for the New Hampshire primary, as it turns 100.

The state’s first presidential primary was held in 1916, when old-school Yankee Republicans dominated New England. Since then, the GOP has shifted South. And modern New Hampshire Republicans are far more socially progressive than their fellow Republican kin across the country.

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Hartford's town committee meets Monday to endorse its slate. And it's unclear how it will respond to the recent news regarding Treasurer Adam Cloud. 

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The life of the black Republican is pretty lonely these days, but it hasn’t always been that way. Black Americans were deeply rooted in the party of Lincoln for decades to avoid joining a Democratic Party controlled by "devils from below the Mason-Dixon line."

Official White House portrait of Thomas Jefferson; James Tooley, Jr. portrait of Andrew Jackson / Creative Commons

Connecticut Democrats are changing the name of the party's annual Jefferson Jackson Bailey Dinner, agreeing to strip the names of two former slave owners.

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Though it often seems like a distant institution, the U.S. Supreme Court affects our lives more than you might think. 

 

This hour -- from its recent rulings on health care and same-sex marriage, to its role in the upcoming presidential election -- we take an intimate look inside the world of the nation's top court. 

The Flap Over Flags

Jul 22, 2015
Sam Howzit / Creative Commons

Flags have been in the news a lot lately. South Carolina removed the Confederate flag from its Statehouse this month and one Missouri county threatened to lower the flags at their courthouse for one full year to mourn the Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Congressman Joe Courtney joins a classified bipartisan briefing today on the Iran nuclear deal. 

Veterans groups have added to the chorus of condemnation against Donald Trump — much of it coming from within his own party — following disparaging remarks the real-estate mogul and Republican presidential candidate made about Sen. John McCain's war record.

And Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America:

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Democratic leaders of the Connecticut General Assembly say they've decided not to try and override any of Democratic Governor Dannel  Malloy's nine vetoes.

This hour, we'll talk about Ben Rothenberg's Serena-driven body image piece, and the stir it caused. Mark Leibovitch's peice on

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President Obama's agreement with Iran now heads to Congress. As part of the deal, Iran will curtail its nuclear program in exchange for billions of dollars in relief from international sanctions. But the idea of lifting sanctions has rankled many, including Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who called the deal a "historic mistake." 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It has been a full three weeks since The Wheelhouse was last on the air due to vacations and unexpected absences. That means we have no shortage of news to talk about. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will recap the last three (!?) weeks in news with intrepid reporters who stuck around to cover the special session and all the fallout from the budget implementer. We discuss that at-length on this week's edition of The Wheelhouse.

Office of Governor Dannel P. Malloy

Governor Dannel Malloy's chief of staff has announced he will leave the administration by the end of the year.

KAZ Vorpal / Creative Commons

Univision and NBC cut ties to Donald Trump and he won't be returning to The Apprentice, his long-running television show, because of the inflammatory comments he made about Mexican immigrants last week. But, he doesn't seem to care. Despite the comments, or maybe because of them, his appeal seems to rise with his belligerence.

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News about other countries tends to focus a lot more on what’s wrong with a place, than what’s going right.

Recently, reports about the earthquake in Nepal, kidnappings in Nigeria and Islamic extremism in Iran have dominated the news.

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The Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission is asking the Connecticut attorney general's office to enforce in court the panel's subpoena seeking records from the Democratic State Central Committee.

Official White House portrait of Thomas Jefferson; James Tooley, Jr. portrait of Andrew Jackson / Creative Commons

Like several other states, Connecticut's Democratic Party hosts its annual Jefferson Jackson Bailey Dinner next week. Like others, the party is also revisiting the name of this fundraiser.

The event is named after national historical figures Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson. State political operative John Moran Bailey's name is added to Connecticut's dinner.

lculig/iStock / Thinkstock

We usually think of propaganda as a tool used by autocrats eager to manipulate minds and limit rights we take for granted in the West. Vladimir Putin, Kim Jong-un or King Salman bin Abdulaziz wouldn't have a chance with us.

But Western culture is steeped in propaganda that's more insidious and less blatant.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A coalition of labor unions and social services advocates say Connecticut lawmakers should increase income taxes on the wealthy rather than impose spending cuts to cover the governor's proposed rollback of business tax increases.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Hillary Clinton's family moved to Park Ridge, Ill., in 1950 when she was a toddler. It's a quiet, upper middle-class suburb of Chicago — except for all the airplanes.

"Park Ridge is right under O'Hare [International Airport]," said Ernie Rickets, who grew up with Clinton. "It's in the final approach"

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Groups providing services to people with mental health, substance abuse, and developmental disabilities are worried about Governor Dannel Malloy's proposal to make additional spending cuts to Connecticut's new budget in order to roll back business tax increases.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Since taking office, Sen. Chris Murphy has been vocal on U.S. foreign policy both in the Ukraine/Russia conflict, and in the Middle East. In a recent op-ed for Foreign Affairs, he joined other senators to advocate for new foreign policy principles.

The 2016 presidential cycle is a first for women. It’s the first time two women are simultaneously vying for the White House as the nominee of each of the two major parties, political research analysts say.

But for Republican presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina, gender-identity politics is complicated.

Now that Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has made it very clear that she won't be a candidate for president in 2016, some of the Democratic candidates in the race are actively seeking the backing of Warren's supporters.

Bernie Sanders is making a major effort to bring them over to his presidential campaign.

Exploring European Conservatism

Jun 10, 2015
Bobby Hidy, Creative Commons

Just listen to Republican candidates for president of the U.S., and you have a pretty good idea of what modern, American conservatism is all about: lower taxes, gun rights, and smaller government, to name a few notions.

But in Europe, where political, social, and economic climates are much different, what does the political right look like? 

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The chairman of the Connecticut Republican Party says the state GOP plans to raise and spend $500,000 to try and win control of the General Assembly.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Connecticut's House of Representatives passed a $40 billion state budget after Democratic leaders worked through the night to secure enough votes.

The bill, which needed 72 votes, was approved Wednesday morning 73 to 70. It now heads to the Senate, which by law must act on the package by midnight when the General Assembly is scheduled to adjourn for the summer.

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