environment

PORTLAND, Maine - Southern New England's fading lobster fishery will be the subject of a battery of new regulations to try to save the crustacean's population locally.

The interstate Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission's American Lobster Management Board voted on Monday to use new management measures to address lobster decline.

In 2013, the number of adult lobsters in New England south of Cape Cod was estimated at about 10 million. That is one-fifth the total in the late 1990s.

cogdogblog / Creative Commons

After more than two years, an effort to reduce the amount of food thrown out by big businesses and supermarkets is finally starting to take hold in Connecticut.

Pixabay / Creative Commons

Ahh spring, the flowers are blooming, asparagus is growing, and, oh yes, the lawn needs mowing. 

Paul Van Der Woof / Creative Commons

The Tragedy of the Commons follows the theory that people can't be trusted to take care of common property without degrading it or taking more than their fair share of resources. This idea was popularized by William Forster Lloyd, who published a pamphlet in 1833 using cow herders to prove that people couldn't be trusted to share our common resources wisely. He believed property should be owned privately.

A bill before the U.S. House of Representatives would designate Connecticut's lower Farmington River as “wild and scenic,” which means it would get federal funding and protection. Last week the U.S. Senate voted in favor of it, something advocates have wanted them to do for nearly ten years.

In the past week, two major natural gas pipelines have been scrapped in New York. A third, which would expand a line that is near the Indian Point Nuclear Power plant, is still scheduled, but opponents are putting pressure on Governor Cuomo to use his persuasive powers with the federal government to stop the expansion.

Randy Wick / Creative Commons

A bill that would gradually phase out single-use plastic and paper bags at supermarkets and grocery stores in Connecticut has passed out of the state Senate and is awaiting action in the House. 

Ines Hegedus-Garcia / Creative Commons

The city of Hartford and Trinity College have resolved a legal dispute over whether the school should be allowed to use artificial turf for new athletic fields. The move avoids a fight between a new administration and one of the city's biggest stakeholders.

John Winkelman / Creative Commons

I've got a question for you. The top ten vegetables grown by home gardeners really haven't changed much in the last 20 years, except for one new comer. Any ideas? Think spicy.

Plans to build a $3.3 billion natural gas pipeline from New York into New England through western Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire have been suspended.

Houston-based Kinder Morgan Inc. announced Wednesday it has decided to stop work on the project. It cites a lack of contracts with gas distribution companies.

The company also says New England states haven't established needed regulatory procedures to allow it to move forward and the process in each state for creating those procedures remains open-ended.

haru__q / flickr creative commons

Everybody loves a bulldozer. In fact, we all grew up loving bulldozers, didn't we? From "Benny the Bulldozer" to Katy and her big snow, from all the Tonka toys to all the die cast model Caterpillars, the bulldozer is more of an icon in American popular culture than we maybe realize.

Randy Wick / Creative Commons

A bill to phase out plastic bags at grocery stores is moving forward and it's got the support of one prominent garbage man. 

Kristin Shoemaker / Creative Commons

Irises are embedded in our art and culture. Vincent Van Gough and Georgia O’Keefe loved to paint them. Mary Oliver and Robert Frost waxed poetic about them.

Nicole Marie Photoworks / Flickr Creative Commons

Spring has sprung, and with that comes gardening season! Are you thinking about how to get your garden ready? 

This hour, we talk garden trends, soil prep, pruning, pest management, managing invasives, supporting pollinators, and so much more.

Lori Mack / WNPR

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon underscored the timeliness and relevance of the U.N. Global Colloquium of University Presidents in the face of the vast destruction of cultural treasures and explained their importance.

Maura Healey / Facebook

The Massachusetts Attorney General’s office has filed its opposition to an injunction request by Kinder Morgan. The company wants to build a natural gas pipeline which would run through state-owned conservation land in Southern Berkshire County on its way to Connecticut.

Dean Hochman / Creative Commons

Money set aside for energy-efficiency projects could soon get slashed as state legislators work to close a large budget deficit.

Catherine Bukowski / Creative Commons

In my book, Foodscaping, I talk a lot about growing trees not just for shade or flowering, but for their fruiting. 

Pattys-photos / Creative Commons

Biologists are starting to augment eyes in the forest with eyes in the sky. But even as satellite imagery has a growing role in a field long-dominated by on-the-ground observation, the brave biologist trekking through a rainforest with binoculars and a cool hat isn't going away anytime soon. 

NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, 2013 Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition Science Team

The fight to grant permanent federal protection to three areas off New England's coast continues, despite a setback for conservationists at one of the spots. 

Wikimedia Commons

Atomic energy advocates, state employees, and energy business leaders recently met with legislators in Hartford to assess the future of Connecticut's only nuclear power plant -- the Millstone Power Station in Waterford.

5u5 / Creative Commons

Gardeners are always looking for perennial flowers that will thrive in shade and provide color. I've got just the plant: coral bells, or heuchera.

gromgull / Creative Commons

As the lead-contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan, continues, Connecticut's Department of Public Health said lead contamination levels in public water systems in the Nutmeg State are extremely low. 

Andrew Ciscel / Creative Commons

What if commuting between Connecticut and Long Island meant hopping into a car and driving through a tunnel deep below Long Island Sound? Sounds far-fetched, right?

Well, if you're New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, you might not think so. And if you're Amtrak, you might think it shouldn't be cars driving under the Sound, but trains connecting the Northeast Corridor

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

Ahh sweet magnolias with memories of Grateful Dead concerts and warm, spring days. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford resident Tenaya Taylor, 25, became a bike commuter last summer. She’s a college student and works a few different jobs around the city. The bus schedule can be unreliable sometimes, she said, so biking for her is the fastest way to get around. 

On March 9, a total solar eclipse was perfectly visible in Indonesia. Alaska, Hawaii, parts of southeast Asia and some of Australia got a partial view.

The rest of us, alas, were out of luck.

But now you can enjoy the view from another angle — the solar eclipse as seen from space.

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

The project to bring a bottled water facility to Bloomfield will be up for discussion at the State Capitol Friday.  There's a public hearing on a bill that would make it harder for bottling companies to get discounts on the public water they buy. 

David Brooks / Creative Commons

A bipartisan group of legislators is voicing support for a proposed state constitutional amendment that would make it more difficult to sell off Connecticut's forests and parks.

Stephen Melkisethia / Creative Commons

This vegetable has the sad reputation from ancient Greece of rendering males impotent. 

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