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Access Health CT

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Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, must figure out its future under soon-to-be President Donald Trump. But that’s far from simple. Trump has been clear he intends to repeal and replace Obamacare – the Affordable Care Act – but it's less clear what he intends to replace it with. 

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A new commander in chief will lead the nation in January and some Americans are wondering about what he will do to keep our planet healthy.

This hour, we consider how a Trump Administration could impact global efforts to tackle climate change and how health care might evolve under the new President's watch. 

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Connecticut’s Democratic governor will have to reckon with a new legislative landscape when the General Assembly reconvenes in January. The state Senate is now split evenly between Republicans and Democrats, and the GOP also picked up eight seats in the House, leaving Democrats with a slim, seven-seat majority. 

The Connecticut Mirror

Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, said its hoping to grow enrollment next year, despite challenges over rates, competition, and access. 

Open enrollment in health care plans for 2017 begins on Tuesday, November 1. If people want their plans to start on January 1, they must be enrolled by December 15.

Courtesy of Access Health CT

Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, finally knows what it will be able to offer its consumers next year, as ConnectiCare agrees to continue to offer plans. But the problem of unaffordable healthcare remains. 

ConnectiCare

Health insurer ConnectiCare has backed down and announced it will sell plans on the state’s health care exchange next year. The Farmington-based company withdrew its legal and regulatory appeals against the rates determined by the Connecticut Insurance Department. 

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Connecticut-based health insurer Aetna is calling off its public insurance exchange expansion plans for next year as it becomes the latest big insurer to cast doubt on the future of a key element of the Affordable Care Act.

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Single-family home sales in Connecticut rose a bit over four percent in June, according to the latest report from The Warren Group, a banking and real estate trade publisher.

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Insurance brokers are concerned that they may no longer get commissions for business they sell on the state’s healthcare exchange, Access Health CT.

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Connecticut’s Insurance Commissioner Katharine Wade said the 40,000 customers of HealthyCT shouldn’t panic about news that the health insurer looks likely to go out of business. Wade said her department will make sure that consumers experience a smooth transition.

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Connecticut's Department of Insurance is reviewing rate increase requests filed by 14 health insurance companies that range on average from 2.1 percent to 32 percent. 

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A decision by the U.S. Supreme Court last week effectively limits the amount of healthcare claims information a state can gather. But one Connecticut official says the decision may not be the blow that many people think. 

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Roughly 8,000 people in Connecticut failed to pay their first month's premium for insurance under the Affordable Care Act.  And that means that they won't be covered under Obamacare this year. 

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More than 116,000 people signed up for private insurance through Obamacare in the program's third year of open enrollment. 

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Open enrollment for the third year of the Affordable Care Act is ongoing, but at least one deadline has already passed. 

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Health insurance co-ops are companies that were given federal incentives to compete for business under the Affordable Care Act. Roughly two dozen of them set up shop across the country. Now, only half are still in business, and one of them is in Connecticut. 

Courtesy of Access Health CT

The third year of health insurance enrollment under the Affordable Care Act is here. But the goal now isn’t just increasing the number of people with insurance. It’s also making sure they go to the doctor. 

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The legislature recently made it harder for parents to stay on Husky, Connecticut's version of Medicaid. The state said that around 1,200 people risk losing their insurance coverage at the end of the month if they take no action.

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Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson waged a war on poverty  to rebuild America as a “Great Society” where “no child will go unfed, and no youngster will go unschooled.” 

Medicaid was enacted in 1965 as part of sweeping legislation to provide food, education, healthcare and jobs to millions in poverty.  Once a benefit for poor single parents and their kids, Medicaid now covers mental illness, disabilities, the elderly and most recently, millions of the previously uninsured through Obamacare.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy applauded today's Supreme Court decision upholding the part of the Affordable Care Act that allows the government to subsidize health care for the poor and middle class. 

The states that set up their own insurance marketplaces have nothing to lose in King v. Burwell, the big Supreme Court case that will be decided by the end of June. But that doesn't mean those states are breathing easy.

With varying degrees of difficulty, all of the state-based exchanges are struggling to figure out how to become financially self-sufficient as the spigot of federal start-up money shuts off.

Courtesy of Access Health CT

The agency that runs the state's insurance marketplace under Obamacare approved a new budget Thursday, and this will be the first year that Access Health CT will operate without substantial federal support. 

The future of Vermont’s health insurance exchange depends on the Shumlin administration’s ability to meet a looming deadline. Still unanswered, though, is the question of how to proceed if the milestone goes unmet. Lt. Gov. Phil Scott and top lawmakers think the solution might be in Connecticut.

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Open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act ended in February. But as WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, uninsured Connecticut residents who just found out about the financial penalty in the law now have one more month to apply for coverage. 

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A dispute between Governor Dannel Malloy and the federal government over Medicaid reimbursement rates could cost state taxpayers an extra $45 million. 

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