Where We Live

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays at 9:00 am and 7:00 pm

Where We Live is a talk show about where we live in Connecticut, in New England, in the United States, and on the planet. It's also a show about who we are, and our place in the world.

Where We Live is a call-in show, so on any given day, listeners can join the conversation with elected officials and policy experts on a wide array of topics: from immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We also explore the latest scientific research, changes in the health care system, and how the effects of worldwide events like climate change impact us locally.

We take time to highlight our diverse communities and their contributions, including the arts and music. We take your questions, and we want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

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Public school superintendents in the state’s three largest cities — Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford — have all recently announced their resignations.

This hour, we look at superintendent turnover in Connecticut.

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

It’s almost election day and voting demographics have changed dramatically since our last presidential election. The number of eligible Hispanic voters has jumped 17 percent since 2012 according to the Pew Research Center.

This hour, we talk about the Latino vote here in Connecticut and nationwide.

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When was the last time you changed your address? Well, if you're like most Americans, it probably wasn't that long ago. According to the Census Bureau, the average U.S. resident will move 11.7 times in his or her lifetime. This hour, we take a closer look at why we're on the move so much. What does it take to truly feel at home where you live? It's something journalist Melody Warnick writes about in her new book called This Is Where You Belong

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A tree’s roots touch more than just soil. They reach into the recesses of our past; into our culture and our traditions. It's something Fiona Stafford writes about in her new book The Long, Long Life of Trees. This hour, we sit down with the author. 

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Connecticut is home to some of the wealthiest Americans in the country, and yet its cities are among the nation’s poorest. Some say the first step to ending this inequality is to spread the wealth from thriving suburban areas to struggling urban areas.

This hour, we talk regionalization – will Connecticut ever embrace it as the state struggles with constant deficits?

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August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning play The Piano Lesson opens this Friday at Hartford Stage. This hour, we preview the production. We also find out how it's inspiring some Connecticut residents to open up about the importance of family legacy. 

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As traditional college graduates shoulder large student loan debt and companies hunt for skilled labor, technical and vocational high schools are garnering more attention. Do skills like 3D printing and precision machining really help students get jobs and higher wages?

This hour, we explore the value of career and technical education in Connecticut and nationwide.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Election Day is just around the corner, which means it’s almost time to cast your vote in Connecticut's U.S. Senate race. Last month, Republican candidate Dan Carter stopped by for an in-depth look at his campaign. 

This hour, it's Democratic incumbent Richard Blumenthal's turn to answer our questions and hear from you. As always, we take your calls, tweets, and emails.  

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Since March, several infants in Connecticut have died at home daycares – resulting in police investigations and heightened concern among parents.

This hour, we talk about child care – many of us rely on it, how do we keep it safe?

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Between the name-calling, finger-pointing, and off-color remarks, it's hard to imagine a political contest more uncivil than the 2016 presidential race.

But is civility as a whole in jeopardy? This hour, we take closer look with How Civility Works author Keith J. Bybee. 

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The state Department of Children and Families is back in the news facing sharp criticism over multiple issues. This hour, we dig into them and we'll examine what, if anything, needs to change within DCF.

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The leaves are turning, the temperature is dropping -- autumn has arrived and with it, the start of an exciting new season for New England gardeners.

This hour -- from planting, to pruning, to pest prevention -- we team up with Connecticut Garden Journal host Charlie Nardozzi to answer your fall gardening questions. What are you doing to prepare your garden for the spring and summer months? 

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Tech giant Yahoo and the Democratic National Committee have been some of the latest organizations to fall victim to high profile hacks. But cyber attacks are also a very real threats to small businesses – many which call Connecticut home.

This hour, we talk cyber security -- how to prevent hacks and stay secure. 

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There is no shortage of places to gamble in the northeast -- with casinos in states like New York, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and of course Connecticut where high rollers can try their luck at Mohegan Sun or Foxwoods Resort Casino in the southeastern part of the state.

And more casinos are on their way.

This hour, we get an update on MGM Springfield and where plans stand to open a third casino in North Central Connecticut operated jointly by the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, as part of WNPR’s week-long reporting series on the opioid epidemic, we explore racial disparities within the context of America’s crack cocaine and opioid crises

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Five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease -- the sixth leading cause of death in this country. There are many caregivers who provide unpaid care for their relatives with Alzheimer’s or other types of dementias -- but it’s not an easy role to fill.

This hour, we explore caregiving and how it can impact a person’s physical and emotional health -- and their finances. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Democrat Richard Blumenthal is vying for a second term in the U.S. Senate. His challenger? Forty-nine year-old Republican state representative and military veteran, Dan Carter

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Monday night was an historic night for American politics. Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump went head-to-head in their first presidential debate -- and boy, did things get interesting.

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It’s debate season and Monday night marks the first showdown between presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

This hour, we discuss what this first presidential debate means for voters in the Nutmeg State and nationwide. And we talk with PolitiFact.com founder Bill Adair on how his team wades through statements that come out of the mouths of politicians. What does fact checking mean for you this election season? 

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News of General Electric's departure rang loudly across Connecticut this year, causing some to point fingers at the state's so-called “anti-business climate.” Still, that hasn't stopped some international businesses from putting down roots here. 

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Zero tolerance policies send a strong message to students but at what cost?

This hour, we examine how over time, these policies have led to suspensions and expulsions for minor issues -- and can have drastic effects on a student’s future.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This year marks an important milestone in our nation's history -- 35 years since the discovery of HIV/AIDS. This hour, we look back to see how far we've come in understanding, treating, and destigmatizing HIV/AIDS in America. 

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Nearly 8 percent of adults and children in the United States have asthma, but new Connecticut state data shows that there has been a decrease in asthma-related hospitalizations and Emergency Room visits in many of our communities.

This hour, we learn more about asthma trends in our state and we examine measures our health providers are putting in place to curb the effects of the disease. And later, we check in on how well Connecticut is doing to prevent lead poisoning among children. 

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This hour, we look at the impact of climate change on New England's native plant and animal species. We talk with scientists and science journalists, and we hear from you. Have you noticed anything different about the flora and fauna in your backyard? And what can historical records -- like the observations of naturalist Henry David Thoreau -- teach us about our changing environment? 

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Illicit use of prescription drugs has almost tripled among high school students in southeastern Connecticut. That's according to the Southeastern Regional Action Council.