Tucker Ives


Tucker Ives produces WNPR’s talk shows, Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show. He produced the PRNDI award-winning episode on the world of children’s television in 2010 and his reporting on the last remaining bell factory in the country destroyed in a fire aired on NPR’s Morning Edition.

Tucker graduated from Ithaca College's Roy H. Park School of Communication in 2011 where he was a producer, reporter and host at WICB. He started off as an intern and freelancer with WNPR in the summer of 2009 and kept coming back for more until he was hired full-time in 2011.

In addition to producing Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show, Tucker is the producer and a substitute host for WNPR’s Morning Edition and occasionally reports for WNPR. On the side, he produces the book podcast Literary Disco.

During his Ithaca College years, Tucker was a Television-Radio major with a concentration in International Communications. He traveled to Qatar for a research project focused on the pan-Arab television network, Al Jazeera Children’s Channel. Tucker was also a producer for a documentary film on a third-party candidate running for mayor of New York City. He presented his research on obscenity regulations in the media at the National Conference for Undergraduate Research in 2011. 

Tucker grew up in Marlborough, Connecticut where he was a video production nerd at RHAM High School. He now lives in Vernon with his wife Jillian and his iPad. According to his 6th grade yearbook, Tucker initially wanted to be a professional baseball manager. He settled for merely being a fantasy baseball manager. In real life, his favorite team is the Yankees and proudly sat in the last row of the nosebleed section for Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS.

Ways To Connect

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Connecticut is "The Land of Steady Habits," which is why our state budget remains in a state of permanent crisis. Recently, Governor Dan Malloy made emergency cuts to the budget and targeted hospital funding and social services. He was on Where We Live this week and defended his actions and drew more criticism from the hospital community.

Thomas Autumn / Flickr Creative Commons

A recent New York Times op-ed drew attention to Yale University’s endowment and how the money is spent. The report found more was spent on private equity fund managers than to students. This has prompted renewed debate and criticism over big endowments at big schools. But the argument isn’t new. This hour, a conversation with higher education experts about the management of endowment money at the nation’s elite schools.

Emily Stanchfield / Creative Commons

Our weekly Monday afternoon "Scramble" continues the conversation arising from last week’s school shooting in Oregon. As the number of mass shootings continues to rise, the nationwide discussion has reached a stalemate. Is there a different, more effective way to talk about guns? 

Uma Ramiah / WNPR

It turns out that state budget chief Ben Barnes was being dead serious when he said Connecticut was in "permanent fiscal crisis." Recent budget cuts have caused an uproar among hospitals, which get hit hard.

Devon Puglia / State of Connecticut

Gov. Dannel Malloy is on the offensive over CEO compensation at the state's hospitals, as criticism of his Medicaid cuts mounts.

Malloy spoke to reporters after a State Bond Commission meeting in Hartford on Tuesday. He was questioned about recent cuts he made of more than $63 million to state Medicaid reimbursement.

Gerry Lauzon / Creative Commons

Volkswagen is having a moment. Not a good moment, but it's certainly a moment. VW owners are glaring at their vehicles with suspicion after it was revealed the automaker's diesel vehicles were designed to cheat on emissions tests.

Hopefully, VW is not capturing its moment with a selfie because that could be deadly. Plus, selfies are so easy to take, a monkey can do it and maybe even make some money from it.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

At some point during this 2015 municipal election cycle, an argument could be made that Hartford rivaled Bridgeport for having the most bizarre mayoral race in Connecticut. Not anymore. Within the last seven days, incumbent Mayor Bill Finch not only lost his party's nomination to a former mayor who served seven years for corruption, but he also lost a spot on the November ballot.

European Union 2014 - European Parliament

There's a lot of great TV. We already knew that, but the Emmy Awards reiterated that we live in a golden age of television. "TV is where you meet people who are recognizably people, people with whom you are willing to spend your time — either once a week, or in intense hours-long bursts," said Alexandra Petri from the Washington Post. This hour, we recap the Emmys.

We also preview Pope Francis' trip to the United States this week. His visit comes at a time of political divide and presidential politics.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In many of Connecticut's strongly Democratic cities, the local primary IS the election. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse brings you election coverage from across the state, including the close races for mayor in Hartford and Bridgeport.

Are you voting in this primary?

Dominic Chavez / World Bank

Senator Chris Murphy is joining Connecticut advocates to call for a big increase in the number of Syrian refugees resettled in the United States.

U.S. Department of State / Creative Commons

Ever since a photo of a Syrian boy dead on a beach made the rounds of the internet, there has been a new focus on the refugee crisis. The United Nations reports more than four million registered Syrian refugees and the country's neighbors are taking the brunt of the strain. Now Europe is struggling to handle a flood of migrants to that continent. Germany is among the countries imposing border controls in response to the flood of refugees who survived the long and dangerous journey away from war.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

With a week to go before the Hartford Democratic primary, mayoral candidate Luke Bronin stops by for our Where We Vote series. Incumbent Mayor Pedro Segarra was our guest last month and today, we meet his biggest challenger for what is expected to be a tight primary race. We discuss the politics of this race, his plans for the capital city if he's elected, and how his administration would be different from his opponent's.

Paul Morigi / Brookings Institute

The Iowa caucus is nearly five months away and candidates continue to jockey for the limelight. Many supporters of Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders are talking about their candidate like he's Rodney Dangerfield: he gets no respect. Sanders' social media-savvy supporters have not shied away from criticizing media outlets (including this one) for its coverage.

Terrence Dorsey / Creative Commons

For the 33rd year in a row, a collection of classic cars will start their engines in the Lime Rock Historic Festival. The annual event attracts thousands of people to the racetrack in Lakeville, Connecticut.

Juliejules / Wikimedia Creative Commons

A famous Connecticut lighthouse featured on some state license plates sold at auction for almost $300,000. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The 2016 presidential race is well underway, but the race for a Connecticut Senate seat is still in its infancy. A new challenger announced his potential bid against incumbent Sen. Richard Blumenthal who had "no comment" about Larry Kudlow's political ambitions.

Thomas Autumn / Creative Commons

A recent New York Times op-ed drew attention to Yale University’s endowment and how the money is spent. The report found more was spent on private equity fund managers than to students. This has prompted renewed debate and criticism over big endowments at big schools. But the argument isn’t new. This hour, a conversation with higher education experts about the management of endowment money at the nation’s elite schools.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

Minor League Baseball came to a close in New Britain on Sunday. The Rock Cats played their final home game of the season before moving to Hartford next year to become the Yard Goats.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Earlier this month, a group musicians and activists from Connecticut joined artists from around the country, who traveled to Missouri to participate in events marking the one-year anniversary of Michael Brown's death.

The "All Roads Lead to Ferguson: Black Lives Matter Tour," included musicians like The Peace Poets and Peter Yarrow of the folk group Peter, Paul and Mary.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra is in the midst of a tight re-election campaign against Democratic challenger Luke Bronin. After walking out of his party’s endorsement convention, Segarra gathered enough signatures to get on the ballot for the September primary. The mayor stops by our studios to discuss his record, plans for the future of the capital city, and the close race he's in.

Chuck Miller / Creative Commons

Is General Electric really looking to leave the state? What’s Connecticut doing to try to keep them? That’s one of the stories we’re talking about on The Wheelhouse, our weekly news roundtable. Also, there's another round of musical chairs in state government and Governor Dan Malloy brings his support of Hillary Clinton to the Granite State.

Steven L. Shepard / Presidio of Monterey Public Affairs

Officials in France and the United States are celebrating the actions of three brave passengers aboard a train who thwarted an attack. Did these passengers do what you're supposed to do in that situation? This hour, we hear from a retired FBI special agent who will tell us how bystanders should respond to violence.

Office of Governor Dannel P. Malloy

The outgoing chief of staff for Governor Dannel Malloy will soon lead the state's Board of Regents for Higher Education. Mark Ojakian will officially start as interim president on September 28, taking over for Gregory Gray, who announced his resignation earlier this month.

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

Last week, the state Supreme Court issued its ruling on capital punishment and completely repealed it - including for those already on death row. This hour on our weekly news roundtable, The Wheelhouse we talk about the decision and answer your questions about how the state’s judicial system works with guests who will hopefully have answers.

Dirk Knight / Creative Commons

Earlier this summer, we spent a full hour listening to candidates for "song of the summer." Now that summer is winding down, we’re still trying to figure out the winner. Was there a song you just couldn’t get enough of recently? We talk to someone who says for the first time in a long time, there was no "Call Me Maybe," "Blurred Lines," or "California Gurls" (for better or worse).

Also, one popular retailer for music (and everything else) is under harsh criticism. The New York Times reported on the working conditions at "The Everything Store."

In the final segment, we address tall person guilt. Should they feel obligated to stand in back?

John Phelan / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled in favor of a full repeal of the state's death penalty on Thursday.

The decision comes more than three years after a repeal of the death penalty for crimes committed after the law was enacted. It means that eleven people currently on death row in the state will be spared execution.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s a big year for local politics in Connecticut -- and not just Hartford and Bridgeport.

This hour, we check in on the race for mayor in New London.

As we do on most weeks, we catch you up on other stories from across the state, including how to fund the $100 billion transportation overhaul, MGM's desire to get in on the Connecticut casino expansion battle, and the future of juvenile detention facilities.

Ed Schipul/flickr creative commons

Athletes have always used their elevated platform to advance products and ideas. After a game winning play, it's almost expected to hear the star thank either God, the Lord, and/or Jesus. But you won't hear that from Houston Texan running back Arian Foster. He just came out as an atheist playing football for a NFL team in the bible belt. How will that play out?

Chion Wolf

A Central Connecticut State University professor is suspended after the latest in a string of arrests. Ravi Shankar, a poetry professor, was arrested for third-degree larceny after attempting to return unpaid merchandise for store credit at a Middletown Home Depot.


More than 25 years ago, one of the most infamous art heists in history occurred at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. On Thursday, federal law enforcement officials released new surveillance video from the eve of the heist that shows a possible "dry run" of the theft.