WNPR

Lydia Brown

Senior Producer

Lydia Brown is Senior Producer of the daily WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live

She holds a B.A. in Journalism and Music from New York University.

Ways to Connect

University of Liverpool Faculty of Health & Life Sciences / Creative Commons

They're moms and mentors; mathematicians and microbiologists. This hour: women in STEM. We hear from a team of women scientists and engineers, and consider what's being done to foster the next wave of female STEM leaders.

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series " Sesame Street ." Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx .

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Labor pains and lessons from the north. A s Connecticut comes to terms with recent job loss , Massachusetts emerges as a regional leader in statewide job recovery . This hour, we explore the latest job market trends and find out what Connecticut stands to learn from the Bay State.

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What is the future of higher education? This hour, we preview an upcoming Connecticut Forum with one of the forum panelists -- Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, III. The President of the University of Maryland Baltimore County tells us how his school encourages diversity and innovation.

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Twenty-one names ; one long-standing vacancy -- how does Republican President-elect Donald Trump plan to fill the gap on the U.S. Supreme Court ?

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Just 16 days after a long, bitter, and contentious presidential election ended, families come together for Thanksgiving.

Richard Longstreth

In honor of the impending weekend, we're tossing politics aside and rolling down our windows for a road trip -- a journey through the history of American architecture and our long-standing relationship with on-the-road adventure.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

One week has passed since Republican Donald Trump was elected to become the 45th president of the United States. In that time, thousands of immigrants and activists have come together to protest the new President-elect, citing, among other things, Trump's proposals on immigration.

Jeng_Niamwhan/iStock / Thinkstock

Why are some people more susceptible to addiction than others? How does genetic makeup influence a person’s chances of becoming an addict? This hour, we find out how researchers at Yale University and The Jackson Laboratory are working to better understand the science of addiction.

Ninian Reid / Creative Commons

From businessman to president-elect -- it was a victory that surprised many . This hour: the rise of Republican Donald Trump. We recap Tuesday’s election results and we also hear from you. Did you vote? What does a Trump presidency mean to you, your friends, and your family?

Steve Johnson / Creative Commons

Connecticut is in a drought. But what does that mean for the state’s water resources? This hour, we follow up on the controversy surrounding Bloomfield’s new Niagara Bottling facility . The California-based company will be allowed to bottle millions, if not billions, of gallons of public water -- something critics warn against due to recent climate trends. Coming up, we take a closer look.

© Council Brandon

Since the summer, thousands have stood up against the Dakota Access Pipeline -- a multi-billion dollar project, which would carry crude oil through the Dakotas, Iowa, and Illinois.

Devon Buchanan / Creative Commons

Since October, women across the country have been coming forward with allegations against Donald Trump. Their actions follow the release of a 2005 video recording , in which the Republican presidential nominee can be heard making vulgar remarks about women.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It’s been two years since Connecticut's former State Veterans Affairs Commissioner Dr. Linda Schwartz was named Assistant Secretary for Policy and Planning at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In that role, her focus has expanded dramatically -- encompassing issues relevant to veterans and their families across all 50 states.

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When was the last time you changed your address? Well, if you're like most Americans, it probably wasn't that long ago. According to the Census Bureau, the average U.S. resident will move 11.7 times in his or her lifetime . This hour, we take a closer look at why we're on the move so much. What does it take to truly feel at home where you live? It's something journalist Melody Warnick writes about in her new book called This Is Where You Belong .

Martin Svedén / Creative Commons

A tree’s roots touch more than just soil. They reach into the recesses of our past; into our culture and our traditions. It's something Fiona Stafford writes about in her new book The Long, Long Life of Trees . This hour, we sit down with the author.

Vladimir Agafonkin / Creative Commons

August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning play The Piano Lesson opens this Friday at Hartford Stage . This hour, we preview the production. We also find out how it's inspiring some Connecticut residents to open up about the importance of family legacy.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Election Day is just around the corner, which means it’s almost time to cast your vote in Connecticut's U.S. Senate race. Last month, Republican candidate Dan Carter stopped by for an in-depth look at his campaign. This hour, it's Democratic incumbent Richard Blumenthal 's turn to answer our questions and hear from you . As always, we take your calls, tweets, and emails.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Between the name-calling, finger-pointing, and off-color remarks, it's hard to imagine a political contest more uncivil than the 2016 presidential race. But is civility as a whole in jeopardy? This hour, we take closer look with How Civility Works author Keith J. Bybee.

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The leaves are turning, the temperature is dropping -- autumn has arrived and with it, the start of an exciting new season for New England gardeners. This hour -- from planting, to pruning, to pest prevention -- we team up with Connecticut Garden Journal host Charlie Nardozzi to answer your fall gardening questions. What are you doing to prepare your garden for the spring and summer months?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, as part of WNPR’s week-long reporting series on the opioid epidemic , we explore racial disparities within the context of America’s crack cocaine and opioid crises .

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Democrat Richard Blumenthal is vying for a second term in the U.S. Senate. His challenger? Forty-nine year-old Republican state representative and military veteran, Dan Carter .

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Monday night was an historic night for American politics. Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump went head-to-head in their first presidential debate -- and boy, did things get interesting.

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News of General Electric's departure rang loudly across Connecticut this year, causing some to point fingers at the state's so-called “ anti-business climate .” Still, that hasn't stopped some international businesses from putting down roots here.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This year marks an important milestone in our nation's history -- 35 years since the discovery of HIV/AIDS . This hour, we look back to see how far we've come in understanding, treating, and destigmatizing HIV/AIDS in America.

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