Harriet Jones


Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

A new railroad investment is about to get underway in eastern Connecticut that its backers hope will be a boost for the economy right along the tracks and into greater New England. Instead of giants scissors, the New England Central Railroad chose a train to cut the ribbon on this new project.

Fuse / Thinkstock

Bloomfield-based health insurer Cigna has agreed to end a policy that required physicians to fill out extra paperwork before they could give patients a drug used to treat opioid addiction. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

A Canadian startup, Dream Payments, will be relocating to grow its business in Connecticut, after winning the state’s first ever international pitch competition. 

neetalparekh via flickr.com / Creative Commons

Connecticut business leaders are sounding the alarm about the state’s economic direction after the third straight month of job losses.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Running a small business will always be a challenging way of life. But if your home country is occupied by a foreign power and you are part of a diaspora of refugees spread across the world, your challenges rise to a new level. 

Jackson Mitchell / WNPR

An athletic facilities director at Sacred Heart University is alleging that he was unfairly fired after he told the school -- in the interest of full disclosure -- that he’d been diagnosed with dementia. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The lawyers who work for the state’s Attorney General have voted to join a union. A total of 181 attorneys working in the office are eligible to join the AFT.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

One of Connecticut’s top Democrats has fired a shot across the bows of the state’s largest business organization.

Schaghticoke Tribal Nation

The Schaghticoke Tribal Nation is seeking $610 million in compensation from the state of Connecticut, because of the loss of tribal land over more than a century. 

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

South Windsor and East Windsor are now also in the running to host the state's proposed third casino. Candidates from those two towns submitted new bids for consideration to the partnership of Connecticut's two federally recognized Indian tribes, the Mashantucket Pequots and Mohegans. 

Hailshadow/iStock / Thinkstock

One of Connecticut’s AAA affiliates announced it will now resume issuing drivers licenses to non-members, after the state threatened to sue.


Children with certain medical conditions can now legally begin receiving medical marijuana in Connecticut. Governor Dannel Malloy signed legislation that extends the state’s medical marijuana program to minors for the first time. 

Ciaran Griffin/Stockbyte / Thinkstock

Verizon Wireless is to close two call centers in Connecticut, affecting 550 workers. The two sites that will be shuttered are in Wallingford and Meriden. Verizon will offer the affected employees new positions outside of the state. Those who don’t relocate will be eligible for a separation package. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The proportion of people in Connecticut who are working, and yet still struggling to make ends meet has risen in the last two years. That's according to a new study from United Way.

Sage Ross / Creative Commons

Health insurer Aetna is looking to reduce its workforce through early retirement, and will also change some of its workforce policies. The Hartford-based company issued a statement saying it wants to position itself for continued growth in 2017 and beyond.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A Connecticut woman who was sentenced to 18 years in prison for killing her newborn baby is speaking out about the state’s Safe Havens Law. 

Sikorsky Aircraft

The Teamsters union representing many workers at Sikorsky Aircraft in Stratford has voted in favor of a deal that will bring production of a new heavy lift helicopter to Connecticut. But the package also means a 25 percent pay cut for workers who are hired from 2017 onward. 

Nancy Wong/Wikimedia Commons, The White House/Creative Commons / WNPR photo illustration

Drug epidemics are not new in the United States. But there’s something very distinctive about the demographics of this latest wave, which centers around opioid and heroin abuse. It cuts across socio-economic and racial divides. 


The physicians of Yale Medicine will remain within Anthem’s network. The provider group and the health insurance company said Wednesday that they came to terms, just three days before a deadline that would have seen them part ways. 

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

The tribal partnership that proposed a third casino for Connecticut said it’s heard from new towns that might want to host the facility. But the communities that were originally in the running are finding the process frustrating. 

Slawomir Fajer/iStock / Thinkstock

A prominent physicians group in Connecticut and health insurer Anthem face a deadline this week to reach an agreement to keep the doctors within the insurer’s network. The brinksmanship of this particular face-off is attracting the attention of lawmakers. 

Luigi Novi / Wikimedia Commons

The New Haven commuter rail line will be first on the Metro-North system to implement a safety feature called positive train control, but it won’t be fully operational until 2018. That was the update given by Transportation Commissioner Jim Redeker, speaking in the wake of the fatal crash in Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Mike Mozart / Creative Commons

State Treasurer Denise Nappier will review all of Connecticut’s business relationships with Wells Fargo, as the bank is mired in scandal over bogus accounts. Wells Fargo is leading a bond sale for Connecticut next month; Nappier now says she will appoint Morgan Stanley to partner in managing that sale. 

Sikorsky Aircraft

The General Assembly has overwhelmingly approved a bill giving a $220 million aid package to helicopter maker Sikorsky. Both chambers met in special session Wednesday for just one day to consider the legislation.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Bradley Airport put the “International” back into its name Wednesday as a daily flight from Hartford to Ireland gets underway. Irish national carrier Aer Lingus will operate the evening flight to Dublin.