Coming Up on WNPR

October 27 - 31, 2014

MONDAY: Election Check-In: Regional Reporter Roundtable
There’s just over a week until the November 4th elections, so we’re hosting an hour-ling regional political roundtable. We’ll check in with reporters across the Northeast to learn a little more about the political climate in their states -- and find out how it’s impacting things here in Connecticut.

TUESDAY: Syria/ISIS
A new PBS Frontline documentary explores “The Rise of ISIS.” Correspondent Martin Smith joins us to talk about his reporting from Iraq when U.S. airstrikes against the so-called Islamic State began this summer. We’ll also check-in with Senator Chris Murphy, who has been a vocal opponent to U.S. military intervention in the crisis

WEDNESDAY: The Wheelhouse
Our weekly news roundtable.

THURSDAY: A Conversation With New Hartford Superintendent
Hartford’s new superintendent Dr. Beth Schiavino-Narvaez joins Where We Live to talk about her recent “transition report” and the future of Hartford schools.

FRIDAY: Latino Voters
How good of a job have politicians done in addressing some of the key issues facing the Latino community? And what kind of influence will Latino voters have in the upcoming elections? On this episode of Where We Live, we'll sit down with a panel of Latino news experts and reporters to try to answer some of these questions.

 

 

October 27 - 31,  2014

MONDAY: The Scramble
The John Adams / Alice Goodman opera “The Death of Klinghoffer,” is provoking strong and polarized feelings from impassioned people on both sides of the Arab-Israeli conflict whose feelings differ depending through which lens they view the conflict. Does the play romanticize terrorism or offer an empathic view of a long-oppressed people? Regardless of your view, don’t calls to shut down the play ironically wreak of the same intolerance displayed by all sides. Before we talk about this weighty subject, we spend a light-hearted half hour with Superguest Anne Helen Petersen about her new book, “Scandals of Classic Hollywood,” her serious Twitter feed and a topic or two from her great long-form articles on BuzzFeed. We’ll decide the rest on the weekend.

TUESDAY: Connecticut’s Long Tobacco History
Connecticut has a rich history of cultivating tobacco - not for cigarettes - but to make cigar wrappers with the highest-quality Connecticut-grown broadleaf tobacco. While farmers in the North Central areas of our state still make cigar wrappers, growing tobacco is no longer the economic engine that once required farmers to recruit help from all over the country. It’s hard to find someone in this part of Connecticut who didn’t work in the fields as a teenager or know someone who did. We talk to a third-generation farmer, a “Pensy-Girl” and others, including the authors of a new book featuring the tobacco barns that once stood at the center of tobacco production but that are quickly going away.

WEDNESDAY: The Long Uphill Battle Running for Office As a Fringe Candidate
According to the latest Q-poll, a lot of Connecticut voters don’t like any of the candidates running in the upcoming gubernatorial election. But, they don’t have much choice in that race or any of the other state races that generally have 2 candidates - maybe 3 if we’re lucky - on the menu. People are deeply disengaged from our political process, evident in the low percentage of people who vote or bother to become familiar with the issues that affect their daily lives. To make matters worse, our elected officials and often, the media, cultivate the polarization and bickering that turn off qualified candidates whose measured voices and civil behavior get lost in the clamor. Today, we talk about the difficulties of breaking the barriers of entry into public office with several impassioned candidates who persevere against the odds in their quest for public office.

THURSDAY: Immortality Is Creeping Up On Us
We’re captivated by the notion of eternal life, possibly the religious sort, but also on this Earth. From Ponce de Leon’s Fountain of Youth to modern-day anti-aging treatments and diets, we want to live longer. Today, technology is bringing us closer than ever toward extending lifespan beyond the wildest dreams of grandparents who weren’t expected to live much beyond 60. At the turn of the 20th century, it was only 46 years. In addition, healthy living and a little help from modern medical miracles, we feel good until we die. Isn’t more better? Maybe, but amidst the constant race to live longer we don’t often stop to consider whether it will be worth it or if the earth can sustain an immortal population. Plus, you know how you tend to waste something when you have too much of it? We talk to interesting people on both ends of the spectrum.

FRIDAY: The Nose
This week’s Nose panel brings you the latest, and sometimes, lowest news in culture.

October 27 - 31, 2014

MONDAY: The End of Night
A brilliantly starry night is one of nature's most thrilling wonders. Yet in our world of nights as bright as day, most of us no longer experience true darkness. Eight out of ten Americans born today won't ever live where they can see the Milky Way. And exposure to artificial light at night has been cited as a factor in health concerns ranging from poor sleep to cancer. In his book, The End of Night, Paul Bogard travels the globe to find the night, blending personal narrative, natural history, health, science, and folklore to shed light on darkness. Showing exactly what we've lost, what we have left, and what we might hope to regain, he attempts nothing less than a restoration of how we see the spectacularly primal, wildly dark night sky. Bogard joins us for the hour.

TUESDAY: TBA

WEDNESDAY: The Food Schmooze 
If you've ever found yourself stuck in front of the stove at your own party, scrambling to get everything to the table at just the right moment, Ina Garten is here to let you in on her secrets! Thanks to twenty years of running a specialty food store and fifteen years writing cookbooks, she has learned exactly which dishes you can prep, assemble, or cook ahead of time. Whether you’'re hosting a party or simply making dinner on a hectic weeknight, Ina gives you lots of amazing recipes that taste just as good -- or even better! -- when they'’re made in advance. Ina Garten joins the Food Schmooze gang to talk about her new cookbook, Make It Ahead.

THURSDAY: TBA

SATURDAY: The Food Schmooze
If you'’ve ever found yourself stuck in front of the stove at your own party, scrambling to get everything to the table at just the right moment, Ina Garten is here to let you in on her secrets! Thanks to twenty years of running a specialty food store and fifteen years writing cookbooks, she has learned exactly which dishes you can prep, assemble, or cook ahead of time. Whether you’'re hosting a party or simply making dinner on a hectic weeknight, Ina gives you lots of amazing recipes that taste just as good -- or even better! -- when they'’re made in advance. Ina Garten joins the Food Schmooze gang to talk about her new cookbook, Make It Ahead.