Coming Up on WNPR

March 2 - 6, 2015

MONDAY: Maybe It’s Time To Change Who We Put in Prison
There's been a massive shift toward incarceration in America since the 1980's, driven less by higher crime rates, but social and legal policies that disproportionately target racial and ethnic minorities, women and young offenders, often for non-violent offenses. States and the federal government are starting to rethink these policies, often at the urging of local advocacy groups like the Malta Justice Initiative, a national group with deep roots in Connecticut. This house, we talk to them and others about how to improve criminal justice.

TUESDAY: The Primary Care Problem
Remember the grandfatherly doctor who makes house calls and treated three generations of the same family, nursing them through everything from skinned knees to cancer? For the most part, that Norman Rockwell ideal is long gone, and replaced with busy group practices that usher through patients in 15-minute increments. But even that model is struggling. There simply aren’t enough primary care doctors, period. So when the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010, the government included money to train and inspire a new generation of primary care doctors. Today we’ll listen to a short documentary about the “Next Generation of Frontline Doctors” and talk to producer Karen Brown who set out to learn why more young doctors aren’t choosing primary care. We’ll talk to local doctors about the future of primary care.

WEDNESDAY: The Wheelhouse with Governor Malloy
Governor Dan Malloy joins us in studio for an hour-long sit down.

THURSDAY: The Ivy Leagues
With the pressure to excel weighing heavy on elite students and STEM fields being touted as the one sure path to successful future, what kind of environment are top colleges really providing these days? In the controversial new book, Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life, Author Bill Deresiewicz says that top institutions are molding students into anxiety-ridden careerist drones. But Dereisiewicz isn't just a critic of the ivy leagues, he's a former professor at one Coming up, he’ll join us along with a current Ivy league professor and students.

FRIDAY: All About Zoning
Zoning may not be the sexiest topic when it comes to headlines, but it sure has been in the news a lot lately. And it tells us a lot about what matters in our cities and towns. In Hamden, there’s a disagreement with the town and Quinnipiac University over how many student beds the local zoning law requires. In suburban Canton and New Hartford, an area called Satan’s Kingdom may get a new development, hinging on changes to zoning law. In Hartford, zoning designations pave the way to bring in a new stadium and more for the New Britain Rock Cats -- and the city’s idea of what defines a “family” could dictate whether one household gets to stay together under one big roof. 

March 2 - 6, 2015

MONDAY: The Scramble
Arthur Chu argues that Andrew Jackson is the worst president we've ever had and his face should be removed from the $20 bill. For starters, Andrew Jackson removed about 46,000 Native Americans from their established homelands to make way for White settlement leaving a "Trail of Tears" of starvation, disease, and death. At that's just the beginning of a long line of horrors.  Maybe America has never been a paragon of the ideals we hold dear and maybe America would rather forget our past than deal with it. We'll talk about that. Also, the Connecticut State Police Union is upset that Connecticut's longtime state police spokesman, Lt. J Paul Vance was transferred from his job without explanation, provoking tension between the union and controversial public safety commissioner, Dora Schriro. Everyone agrees he's done a good job and served the state well. In 2012, after the shootings at Sandy Hook stunned the state, Lt. Vance calm demeanor and respect for the families brought praise from all over the world. So, why the transfer? Lastly, Ana Marie Cox, the founding editor of Wonkette, author and political blogger came out this weekend as...a Christian.

TUESDAY:  The Teeth Show
Open wide! It's time for The Colin McEnroe Show to explore the fascinating -- albeit, slightly terrifying -- world of American dentistry. We'll talk about some of the challenges that face American dentists today, find out why it is we're so afraid of dental checkups, and learn about the strange, mysterious history of the tooth fairy. 

WEDNESDAY: Mysterious Diseases
Today we’ll tackle some of the most mysterious diseases that are in some cases still debated by doctors and scientists – chronic fatigue syndrome, Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, even misophonia and ASMR.  The symptoms are very real, but the science is not completely understood.

THURSDAY: Northmanship
It’s official. February was the coldest month on record … clocking in at a frigid 16 degrees. Are you feeling shack-wacky? Incessantly complaining about the weekly snow storms? But we live in the northeast! There must be something about this climate that you love. Today, we’re exploring the idea of “northmanship.” What does it mean to be from the north? Is there a connection that we make to truth and beauty? A toughness to Canadians and Alaskans, a poetry to the Icelandic barrenness? Put your winter rage on hold for the hour, and explore northern courage with writer and north-lover Luanne Rice and others.  

FRIDAY: The Nose
Our weekly cultural roundtable. Today, it’s the Book Show. Our panel has (hopefully) read all of the Tournament of Books books, and they’ll have a wonderfully nerdy discussion. Read along, join us!

March 2 - 6, 2015

MONDAY: Personal Intelligence
In our guest John D. Mayer's new book, he draws on decades of research to introduce a paradigm-shifting idea: that in order to become our best selves, we use an even broader intelligence —to understand our own personality and the personalities of the people around us. In Personal Intelligence, Mayer explains that we are naturally curious about the motivations and inner worlds of the people we interact with every day. Some of us are talented at perceiving what makes our friends, family, and coworkers tick. Some of us are less so. Mayer joins us to reveal why, and shows how the most gifted “readers” among us have developed “high personal intelligence.” 

TUESDAY: The Big Fat Surprise
In The Big Fat Surprise, investigative journalist Nina Teicholz reveals the unthinkable: that everything we thought we knew about dietary fat is wrong. She documents how the low-fat nutrition advice of the past sixty years has amounted to a vast uncontrolled experiment on the entire population, with disastrous consequences for our health. For decades, we have been told that the best possible diet involves cutting back on fat, especially saturated fat, and that if we are not getting healthier or thinner it must be because we are not trying hard enough. But what if the low-fat diet is itself the problem? What if the very foods we’'ve been denying ourselves— the creamy cheeses, the sizzling steaks —are themselves the key to reversing the epidemics of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease? Nina Teicholz joins us for the hour.

WEDNESDAY: The Food Schmooze
In his new cookbook Twelve Recipes, Cal Peternell, the chef of Alice Waters’ Chez Panisse offers basic techniques and essential recipes that will transform anyone into a confident home cook. When his oldest son was leaving for college, Peternell realized that, although he regularly made dinners for his family, he’d never taught them the basics of cooking. Based on the life-altering course of instruction he prepared and honed through many phone calls with his son, Twelve Recipes is the ultimate introduction to the kitchen. Peternell focuses on the core foods and dishes that comprise a successful home cook’s arsenal, each building skill upon skill— from toast, eggs, and beans, to vinaigrettes, pasta with tomato, and rice, to vegetables, soup, meats, and cake. Chez Panisse’s Cal Peternell joins the Food Schmooze® gang.

THURSDAY: The Book Show
The Book Show gang joins Faith live with recommendations in all categories. And we’ll take your calls! What’re you reading? What’ve you recently read and loved? Are you a librarian? A teacher? Are you part of a book club? Call us!

SATURDAY: The Food Schmooze 
In his new cookbook Twelve Recipes, Cal Peternell, the chef of Alice Waters’ Chez Panisse offers basic techniques and essential recipes that will transform anyone into a confident home cook. When his oldest son was leaving for college, Peternell realized that, although he regularly made dinners for his family, he’d never taught them the basics of cooking. Based on the life-altering course of instruction he prepared and honed through many phone calls with his son, Twelve Recipes is the ultimate introduction to the kitchen. Peternell focuses on the core foods and dishes that comprise a successful home cook’s arsenal, each building skill upon skill —from toast, eggs, and beans, to vinaigrettes, pasta with tomato, and rice, to vegetables, soup, meats, and cake. Chez Panisse’s Cal Peternell joins the Food Schmooze® gang.