WNPR

Tolland and Windham Region

Our Tolland and Windham Region coverage includes stories about all the towns in the Tolland and Windham Counties, ranging from Somers and Hebron to Thompson and Sterling.

Jillian Ives

We’re at the Student Union on the Storrs campus as a new school year is underway, and the state’s flagship school is back in the news once again. They’re planning new facilities, like a $100-million recreation center for students, and they're preparing for an even bigger rebuild that will require a new flow of water onto campus.

There’s also a "flow" of money for top administrators at the school, as some students worry about what this means for the rising cost of college.

Agriculture Chief Hopes Grants Boost "Locally Grown"

May 13, 2013
Sujata Srinivasan

The recent growth in farmer's markets in Connecticut speaks to the increasing popularity of locally grown food. Now the state's Department of Agriculture has big plans for Connecticut-grown produce to fuel the economy and create jobs. 

Storrs Downtown Supermarket Plans Hit A Snag

Dec 10, 2012

The new Storrs Center just down the road from the University of Connecticut is buzzing with activity. But that project is only partly finished, and the developers have had to make some very big changes to what’s left of it. Critics say those changes could undo the attempt to create a college downtown atmosphere where none existed before.

Wikimedia Commons

Remember the 1989 Robin Williams movie “Dead Poet’s society?” An unorthodox and inspirational teacher takes on the establishment culture of a prestigious boy’s school.

The real-life teacher who helped inspire that character has been teaching literature at UConn since 1978. Sam Pickering told us that he doesn’t really think much about the movie. He told us that he “only saw it once” and even missed parts of it.

Beating the Downturn Together

Jun 30, 2012

The economic downturn has hit many of the small towns in Connecticut ’s Northwest corner hard.   As WNPR’s Lori Ann Brass reports, these “ Main Street ” business districts think they have a much better chance of surviving the economic downturn if they work together.  

 

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