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Technology

Harriet Jones

A lot of effort in recent years has been focused on reducing US dependence on foreign oil. Not so much thought is given to making that oil last longer. One small North Stonington company sends technology around the world that does just that. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

The New Cartography

Jun 27, 2011
Christine Rondeau, Creative Commons

Since the days of great explorers, maps have served a very simple purpose, getting us from point A to point B (without falling off the edge of the earth, of course). 

But with the advent of digital mapping technologies, the form, function and potential of maps has been revolutionized.

Paris Air Show

Connecticut companies both large and small are doing business at the prestigious Paris Air Show this week, the world’s largest gathering of aerospace companies. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

U.S.federal statistics show that 16 to 20-year-olds are more likely to be arrested than involved in car accidents. A Connecticut-based company has created a new smartphone application that provides fast legal advice to people who find themselves in legal emergencies.

The moment when someone has been or is just about to be arrested, is critical, says Chris Miles, a former AIG employee who used to work in insurance and risk management.  "Not only is it time-sensitive, its also a interaction where mistakes matter. You really can’t make an error."

courtesy eGen

Connecticut would like to reinvent itself as the next Silicon Valley. Some economic development experts say our future lies with the state’s small technology companies. If that’s to become a reality, Connecticut’s universities will have to be a key part of the change. A conference today at UConn aims to show the way. 

courtesy eGen

Connecticut would like to reinvent itself as the next Silicon Valley. Some economic development experts say our future lies with the state’s small technology companies. If that’s to become a reality, Connecticut’s universities will have to be a key part of the change. A conference today at UConn aims to show the way. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Courtesy Dymax

This has been National Small Business Week. The President proclaims this week to honor and recognize the contribution of small businesses to the economy. Tonight the Small Business Person of the Year will be chosen in a special ceremony in Washington DC. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Flickr creative commons, Basheer Tome

Brooke Singer

From shopping to banking to taxes “design thinking” is all around us....But beyond the buzz phrase, what does it mean?

Here’s another one: “Data Visualization” - and you’ve gotta come up with something better than an overhead projector showing a pie chart.  

Today we try to understand these new ways of looking at the systems that govern our lives, health, finances, even our environmental impact.  

Photo by Yutaka Tsutano, Courtesy of Flickr CC

This week, the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence is announcing a new way to teach teenagers about healthy relationships. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the message is coming right to a teen's cell phone.

There aren't many teenagers these days who don't have a cell phone. Smartphones like the Iphone and Droid are "the" phones to have because they allow teens to text messages, take pictures and videos, listen to music, surf the web and of course play a ton of cool games.

"I have a lot of games. My mom yells at me for having all the apps."

Harriet Jones

WNPR’s Small Business Project has reported on the high cost of training a skilled workforce to meet the needs of the state and the nation.

This week Harriet Jones visits a small business in Connecticut that’s working on providing a cost-effective and innovative solution to that problem.

I’m in East Hartford at the premises of a company called VRSim, getting a lesson on how to spray paint a vehicle door, from Rebecca McKnight.

“So I’ll do a quick spray for you.”

Harriet Jones

For many small businesses, training Connecticut’s workforce is a key issue for the state’s economic future. That’s one reason why Governor Malloy’s recent proposal to move the state’s technical high schools into municipal control raised so many eyebrows. WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at how well Connecticut is planning to meet its workforce needs in the new millennium.

You might think in an economy like this, employers with a job to fill would be inundated with qualified candidates.

Elvert Barnes, Creative Commons

For years, we’ve been hearing about the chronic struggles of newspapers and the proliferation of so called “new media” sources of journalism.  

As one outcome of this change, the traditional competition for stories between papers has given way to a new era of cooperation. By pooling resources and working together, these upstarts are making a real impact, informing the community, and driving the discussion in collaboration with newspapers.  

Today we continue our series of conversations recorded at a conference called “Lifting the Veil: Journalism Uncovered.”

Flickr Creative Commons, Luiz Fernando

Speaking of Elizabeth Taylor and modern perceptions of American womanhood, Camille Paglia said this week "we're in a period now where everything has to be taut in mind and body."

*n3wjack's world in pixels/flickr creative commons

On this fresh edition of Tech Talk, the guys from Digital Saviors tell us what's new and coming from CES and CeBIT, we check in with a reporter who covered the Pwn2Own hacker conference and competition, and Jim Willcox from Consumer Reports helps us look at Best Buy's new Buy Back Program and the pros and cons of ditching your cable television service.

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