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Technology

Flickr creative commons, Basheer Tome

Brooke Singer

From shopping to banking to taxes “design thinking” is all around us....But beyond the buzz phrase, what does it mean?

Here’s another one: “Data Visualization” - and you’ve gotta come up with something better than an overhead projector showing a pie chart.  

Today we try to understand these new ways of looking at the systems that govern our lives, health, finances, even our environmental impact.  

Photo by Yutaka Tsutano, Courtesy of Flickr CC

This week, the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence is announcing a new way to teach teenagers about healthy relationships. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the message is coming right to a teen's cell phone.

There aren't many teenagers these days who don't have a cell phone. Smartphones like the Iphone and Droid are "the" phones to have because they allow teens to text messages, take pictures and videos, listen to music, surf the web and of course play a ton of cool games.

"I have a lot of games. My mom yells at me for having all the apps."

Harriet Jones

WNPR’s Small Business Project has reported on the high cost of training a skilled workforce to meet the needs of the state and the nation.

This week Harriet Jones visits a small business in Connecticut that’s working on providing a cost-effective and innovative solution to that problem.

I’m in East Hartford at the premises of a company called VRSim, getting a lesson on how to spray paint a vehicle door, from Rebecca McKnight.

“So I’ll do a quick spray for you.”

Harriet Jones

For many small businesses, training Connecticut’s workforce is a key issue for the state’s economic future. That’s one reason why Governor Malloy’s recent proposal to move the state’s technical high schools into municipal control raised so many eyebrows. WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at how well Connecticut is planning to meet its workforce needs in the new millennium.

You might think in an economy like this, employers with a job to fill would be inundated with qualified candidates.

Elvert Barnes, Creative Commons

For years, we’ve been hearing about the chronic struggles of newspapers and the proliferation of so called “new media” sources of journalism.  

As one outcome of this change, the traditional competition for stories between papers has given way to a new era of cooperation. By pooling resources and working together, these upstarts are making a real impact, informing the community, and driving the discussion in collaboration with newspapers.  

Today we continue our series of conversations recorded at a conference called “Lifting the Veil: Journalism Uncovered.”

Flickr Creative Commons, Luiz Fernando

Speaking of Elizabeth Taylor and modern perceptions of American womanhood, Camille Paglia said this week "we're in a period now where everything has to be taut in mind and body."

*n3wjack's world in pixels/flickr creative commons

On this fresh edition of Tech Talk, the guys from Digital Saviors tell us what's new and coming from CES and CeBIT, we check in with a reporter who covered the Pwn2Own hacker conference and competition, and Jim Willcox from Consumer Reports helps us look at Best Buy's new Buy Back Program and the pros and cons of ditching your cable television service.

Harriet Jones

Governor Dannel Malloy has talked a lot about the importance of big business in his first few weeks on the job, and he’s sat down with many of the state’s largest employers. Monday in New London he visited with a small company, that ten years ago was just one man and his computer. WNPR’s Harriet Jones went along.

A workforce training initiative in Eastern Connecticut has become the first in the country to offer college credits for free online work-skills courses. 

For six years, CT Works Careers Centers in Eastern Connecticut have offered their clients free three-month licenses to access over five thousand skills training courses via computer. The courses are concentrated either in IT skills or in health care certifications. John Beauregard of the Eastern Connecticut Workforce Investment Board says the service is already a success.

State Launches E-Waste Recycling Program

Mar 15, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

Computer and T.V. manufacturers are constantly improving technology. Which means consumers regularly buy new stuff and throw out the old. The problem is computers and televisions contain toxic materials that are dangerous and end up in landfills or are shipped to developing countries. The state of Connecticut is now being very careful about where this waste ends up.

Tech Talk

Mar 8, 2011
Blake Patterson/flickr creative commons

It's Tech Talk time, featuring the guys from Digital Saviors in Simsbury. We'll tell you about tablet devices, computers, viruses, and apps. Whether you're a techie or new to the whole thing, don't miss our discussion of what's out there and what you need to know about it, including the new iPad 2, just unveiled.

Flickr Creative Commons, p_a_h

You are surrounded by Artificial Intelligence. It's in your smartphone, in your DVR, probably even in your refrigerator.  

Singularity 101

Feb 8, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, davedehetre

It could be all the coffee I drank this morning, but I think I have an observation that combines the concept of singularity -- the moment at which artificial intelligence or scientifically modified human intelligence becomes smarter than anything that has ever lived on earth -- with the Green Bay Packers Super Bowl victory.  

courtesy Larry Berk

“Buy local” has become a rallying cry for small businesses attempting to revive the high street. But it’s also a good message for those small businesses whose customers are big business. Plenty of small suppliers in Connecticut would like to see big corporations and state government look first in their own backyard when they spend money.

For the latest of WNPR’s small business profiles, business reporter Harriet Jones met with one such small supplier. 

Flickr Creative Commons, psd

Steve Rushin is fearful of robots. First they replaced his father's pin-setting job. Now they're coming for him.

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