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WNPR News sports coverage brings you a mix of local and statewide news from our reporters as well as national and global news from around the world from NPR.

Chion Wolf

Some weeks are inexplicably more scandalous than others.

This week began with a probe into millions of dollars in apparent bribes by Walmart officials in Mexico. And sitting alongside it was the slime spreading across the reputation of the Secret Service as more reports of strippers and club hijinks trickled in from all over the globe.

Five-Time Olympic Archer Giving It One More Shot

Apr 22, 2012
Teresa Iaconi

After five Olympic games, Butch Johnson’s peers hail him as a Superman in the world of archery.

But Johnson is more of a Clark Kent. Tall and broad-shouldered, this resident of Woodstock, Conn. isn’t much of a talker. Nor is he much of a self-promoter.

Over the course of his career, Johnson accumulated 46 national championships. This year, he's shooting to qualify for the Olympics in London, but he made his first Olympic trip in 1992. Since then, he's returned to the games four more times.

New Britain Rock Cats

Apr 10, 2012

Ten years ago, there were three AA-level Minor League Baseball teams in Connecticut. Today, only one remains. The Rock Cats just started its 30th consecutive season of playing in New Britain. Last month, New Britain Double Play, LLC was introduced as the new owners of the franchise led by Josh Solomon and his siblings.

Baseball in the '60s

Apr 10, 2012
Cavalier92 (Flickr Creative Commons)

Baseball is a sport that revels in nostalgia. Get most American men over a certain age talking about the sport - especially in the spring - and you’ll hear about “the good old days” of trips to the ballpark...told in almost poetic terms.

But in the late '60s, as America was changing, so was baseball. It still held its place as the “national pastime” - a daily ritual that could cross racial and economic lines to bring people together - but it was already quickly being surpassed by football in popularity.

Athletes over Fifty

Apr 3, 2012
Providenz

Today's show was the brainchild of producer Betsy Kaplan, but it seems like something I might have thought up, just to deal with some (de)pressing problems in my life. I'm 57. I have arthritis in both knees. One of the magazines I write for wants me to do, this fall, a Gran Fondo, a bike ride of more than 100 miles with a significant elevation change.

I'm literally not sure I can.

But all around me are examples of athletes over 50 doing remarkable things.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 36

Mar 4, 2012
Kim Grehn

Episode 36 was a bit of a college reunion; joining us my were fellow Hobart grads, New York Times Tech columnist Bob Tedeschi and ESPN producer Steve Petyerak. Rounding out this manly conclave: cohost Duo Dickinson, software engineer Justin Gill, and rugby coach and new media man John Broker.

Chion Wolf

There’s no sports market in the United States quite like Connecticut.

Former lacrosse coach alleges gender discrimination

Jan 13, 2012

Another gender discrimination lawsuit has been filed in Connecticut, the latest in what seems like a string of such cases in the state in recent history. But as WNPR’s Neena Satija reports, rather than suing a university, the plaintiff is seeking damages against a youth sports league.

Dr. Claudia Harris was a head coach at the New Canaan Lacrosse Association for years, and her daughter still plays in the league. She felt like the league was unfairly providing more resources to boys’ lacrosse and not enough for girls.

Flickr Creative Commons, ensceptico

The person with the best take on the death of Christopher Hitchens would have to be Christopher Hitchens.

Here he is:

"The only position that leaves me with no cognitive dissonance is atheism. It is not a creed. Death is certain, replacing both the siren-song of Paradise and the dread of Hell. Life on this earth, with all its mystery and beauty and pain, is then to be lived far more intensely: we stumble and get up, we are sad, confident, insecure, feel loneliness and joy and love. There is nothing more; but I want nothing more."

Courtesy of Joe Cahn

I was in the parking area next to Yale Bowl two Saturdays ago as word spread around the clumps of tailgaters that there had been a fatality in one of the lots. Details were sketchy, but everyone seemed to know that people had been hit by a motor vehicle. And for a lot of us, the shadow of that tragedy hung over the whole day. My son was with me, and he has a knack for summing things up. "Imagine dying because you decided to go to a football game," he said sadly.

Great American Losers

Oct 11, 2011

It’s one of the most famous baseball radio broadcasts ever: Giants broadcaster Russ Hodges yelling, “The Giants win the pennant.”

Those words made Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher Ralph Branca want to throw his radio out the window...he was the pitcher that gave up the blast. It’s been 60 years since the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” and Branca still lives with this legacy.

gongus, wfyurasko, andrechinn, Flickr Creative Commons

Even though I deplore what he said about President Obama on Fox & Friends and even though he seems, in general, like kind of a deplorable person, I kinda wish everybody would reconsider the idea of dropping Hank Williams Jr. from Monday Night Football's opening. There's some ethos of excess and yahooism that Hank captures perfectly, and, really, here at NPR, we've learned some hard lessons abou tossing people named Williams aside just because they said something stupid on television.

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