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This story is part of Only A Game’sTime Show” which examines how the passage of time influences sports.


When J.R. Richard was scheduled to pitch, batters sometimes came up with suddenly sore arms, headaches, or flu-like symptoms. At the peak of his career in the late ‘70’s, when the 6-foot-8 right-hander was striking out more than 300 batters a season with a fastball that exceeded 100 mph, the Houston Astros pitcher was among the most intimidating figures in baseball.

This story is part of Only A Game’sTime Show” which examines how the passage of time influences sports.

The Arizona Cardinals made history this summer by hiring the league’s first female coach as an intern during training camp.

“I could not have dreamed big enough to imagine that this day would ever come,” Jen Welter said at her introductory press conference last month. Cardinals head coach Bruce Arians sat by her side.

WWE Lures Former Fans Back To Pro Wrestling

Aug 24, 2015

This story is part of Only A Game’sTime Show” which examines how the passage of time influences sports.

David Shoemaker has been writing about professional wrestling since 2010, at which point his stories weren’t reaching a broad audience.

Call it an exercise in futility. Call it a blueprint for an alternate future. Either way, Boston’s Olympics bid may be dead, but the debate lives on … at least another day.

Jonathan McNicol/WNPR News

Catcher David Marchetti hit two home runs including a storybook game winner in extra innings to lead Cranston, Rhode Island, to a 3–2 win over Waterford, Connecticut, in Bristol. Rhode Island’s victory propels them to the New England Regional semi-final game and ends Connecticut’s run toward the Little League World Series.

It's a Left-Handed Show

Aug 13, 2015
Andreas Levers / Creative Commons

Lefties have been scorned as evil, and celebrated as superior. But, like so many things in life, being a southpaw is not so easily defined. 

Updated at 2:46 p.m. ET

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and the NFL appeared in a Manhattan court today to update a federal judge on whether both sides are any closer to resolving a dispute over the quarterback's pending four-game "deflategate" suspension.

The public portion of the hearing lasted approximately 80 minutes before U.S. Judge Richard Berman met separately with Brady and league officials in private.

It's been less than a year since a domestic violence scandal erupted in the National Football League. The infamous Ray Rice video from last September and the league's mishandling of the case plunged the NFL into an unprecedented crisis.

It also spurred the league into action after years of doing little or nothing about the problem of domestic violence. The problem continues, and so do the efforts to fight it.

New York Jets quarterback Geno Smith will miss a lot of playing time after being "sucker-punched" by a teammate Tuesday. The fracas left him with two fractures in his jaw.

IK Enemkpali, a reserve linebacker who threw the punch, was promptly released by the team. Head coach Todd Bowles told reporters the altercation "had nothing to do with football."

Tobacco — and that long trail of brown spit — has long been seen as part of baseball. It was tobacco companies that created the first baseball trading cards, which came in cigarette packs.

"I looked at a newspaper in 1933 where R.J. Reynolds touted the fact that 21 of 23 of the world champion New York Giants smoked Camel," says Matthew Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

Ed Schipul/flickr creative commons

Athletes have always used their elevated platform to advance products and ideas. After a game winning play, it's almost expected to hear the star thank either God, the Lord, and/or Jesus. But you won't hear that from Houston Texan running back Arian Foster. He just came out as an atheist playing football for a NFL team in the bible belt. How will that play out?

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

The public now has more information to decide whether New England quarterback Tom Brady was truthful about deflated footballs.

Larry Lucchino's role in seeking a new Providence ballpark for the Pawtucket Red Sox "remains unchanged," a team spokeswoman said Saturday, even though Lucchino is winding down his impactful role as CEO of the Boston Red Sox.

"Larry's role remains unchanged with respect to the PawSox ownership group," Patti Doyle said via e-mail. "He remains focused on achieving a renegotiated agreement with the state on relocating the team to a new ballpark on lands within the I-195 District [area] in Providence."

Hours before his group’s Olympic bid collapsed, Boston 2024 co-founder Corey Dinopoulos wrote a letter to Boston Mayor Marty Walsh.

Walsh had just said he would not support a guarantee to back the games with public funding in the event of cost overruns.

Saying that New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady "was aware of, and took steps to support, the actions of other team employees to deflate game footballs" below required levels, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has upheld the punishment.

In doing so, Goodell also faulted Brady for not cooperating with the investigation, citing his "destruction of potentially relevant evidence" — a reference to Brady's cellphone and SIM card, which he gave to an assistant to be destroyed, according to Goodell's findings.

It's official. The 2024 Olympic Games will not take place in Boston.

The Associated Press reports that the U.S. Olympic Committee "severed ties" with Boston on Monday. In a statement, Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh said, "I strongly believe that bringing the Olympic Games back to the United States would be good for our country and would have brought long-term benefits to Boston." He continued, "However, no benefit is so great that it is worth handing over the financial future of our City and our citizens were rightly hesitant to be supportive as a result."


The CDC recently announced that kissing or cuddling your chickens is a health hazard. Because… Well, because people kiss or cuddle their chickens, apparently. Some people probably kiss and cuddle their chickens. But you shouldn’t kiss or cuddle your chickens. Because your chickens are basically just waddling featherballs of salmonella, it turns out. So, ya know. Don’t kiss or cuddle your chickens.

But before we get to that, two other stories: