WNPR

Small Business

WNPR’s small business coverage elevates understanding of the challenges faced by small business, educates policy-makers, and highlights the vital role of small business to the state’s economy. 

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Connecticut business leaders are sounding the alarm about the state’s economic direction after the third straight month of job losses.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Running a small business will always be a challenging way of life. But if your home country is occupied by a foreign power and you are part of a diaspora of refugees spread across the world, your challenges rise to a new level. 

Keeping Our Businesses Cyber Secure

Oct 6, 2016
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Tech giant Yahoo and the Democratic National Committee have been some of the latest organizations to fall victim to high profile hacks. But cyber attacks are also a very real threats to small businesses – many which call Connecticut home.

This hour, we talk cyber security -- how to prevent hacks and stay secure. 

Kenneth Lu / Creative Commons

News of General Electric's departure rang loudly across Connecticut this year, causing some to point fingers at the state's so-called “anti-business climate.” Still, that hasn't stopped some international businesses from putting down roots here. 

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In an era awash in the rollout of brand new gadgets, gizmos, fashions, and fads, it's easy to think of obsolescence as part of the natural order -- remember popped lapels, pay phones and laserdisc players? But the idea that an object should quickly fall from favor, lose functionality, and find itself in a landfill somewhere is quite new -- and it didn't come about by accident.

Why We Leave and Why We Stay

Aug 29, 2016
Nicolas Raymond / Creative Commons

Recently we did a show about the science of loving where you live and we heard from plenty of Connecticut residents who really do love living here. But that sentiment is not shared by everyone. Some residents say high taxes are driving them away to places like Florida and North Carolina.

This hour, we talk about out-migration from Connecticut. We also explore the number of people who are moving into the state — what’s known as in-migration. And we want to hear from you. Are you looking to leave Connecticut once you retire? If not, why do you want to stay here?  

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Connecticut’s early settlers came to this region in part for our fertile farmland — but what is the state of farming in Connecticut today?

This hour, we explore agriculture in the Nutmeg State.

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New rules from the federal government will put tighter regulations on the trucking industry. The restrictions are aimed at cutting carbon pollution and bolstering fuel efficiency. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we discuss Governor Malloy's Second Chance 2.0 legislation and find out why it failed to pass during the 2016 session. We also look at what some Connecticut communities are doing to support re-entry. And we talk to a local restaurant owner about his decision to hire ex-offenders

Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology

Connecticut’s Aerospace Industry accounted for almost half of the state’s $15 billion of exported commodities last year. Many of the state’s aerospace companies got a boost recently from the Farnborough International Air Show in England.

The state’s largest business organization recently released its first survey exclusively aimed at small businesses. The Connecticut Business and Industry Association's survey found that hiring was up, but it also found small businesses have some bones to pick with their state legislators.

Harriet Jones

The Connecticut Low Wage Employer Advisory Board is holding its third hearing on Wednesday in Bridgeport. 

Natalie Maynor / Creative Commons

Connecticut is seeing an increase in the number of new farmers. The number of start-ups has grown by 15 percent from 2007.

After several boom years while the rest of the economy struggled, farming is entering its third year on the bust side of the cycle. Major crop prices are low, while expenses like seed, fertilizer and land remain high. And that means farmers have to get creative to succeed.

Modern crop farms in the Corn Belt are sophisticated businesses. So put aside your notions of bucolic red barns surrounded by a few cows. And pull out your best business school vocabulary, because crops are commodities.

Connecticut has seen robust growth in businesses owned by women over recent years, and much of the increase appears to be driven by minority entrepreneurs. 

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