Personal Finance

Donna / Creative Commons

In an era awash in the rollout of brand new gadgets, gizmos, fashions, and fads, it's easy to think of obsolescence as part of the natural order: Remember popped lapels, pay phones and laserdisc players? But the idea that an object should quickly fall from favor, lose functionality, and find itself in a landfill somewhere is quite new -- and it didn't come about by accident.

Unemployment Down, But Dream Jobs Still Out Of Reach

Aug 31, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In New York and Connecticut, unemployment is at 5.4 percent, the lowest it has been in seven years. Nationwide, unemployment has dropped its lowest levels since the recession, giving those entering the workforce more opportunity. But for many, that elusive dream job is still out of reach. 

Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, L.P.

A proposed project to upgrade and construct a natural gas pipeline from Pennsylvania to Massachusetts has many spurs, one of them stretching into parts of Connecticut.

MGM is setting out to fill some of the 2,000 construction jobs that were promised to build the company’s $800 million Springfield casino.

MGM officials are scheduling two days of interviews, Thursday and Friday, with minority-owned and women-owned union construction companies interested in bidding for jobs on the project. 

The Las Vegas-based entertainment company  interviewed veteran-owned businesses in July at its Springfield construction office. 

CT Labor Department

The state Department of Labor is facing some pushback to its decision to close six job centers in Connecticut.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Earl O’Garro, the insurance broker who prosecutors allege defrauded the city of Hartford, the state, and others out of roughly $1.5 million, is asking a judge to delay his trial by two months

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy says he last visited with General Electric two weeks ago, as the conglomerate prepares to make a decision about relocation. The governor spoke for the first time about the possibility that GE might leave.

James Williams / Creative Commons

The owner of the Mystic Pizza restaurant made famous in a 1988 film was sentenced to prison for tax evasion and concealing hundreds of thousands of dollars in income. 

Stocks opened Monday with a swan dive: The Dow Jones industrial average plunged about 1,000 points, or 5 percent, in just minutes.

By midday, enough brave buyers had waded back in to push up prices — up to where losses were only around 1 percent or so.

But that didn't last. Around 3 p.m., the Dow dropped again, sliding nearly 700 points.

Stress-filled minutes ticked down until 4 p.m.: CLANG, CLANG, CLANG.

The closing bell rang. Brows were wiped, and commentators scrambled to explain why investors had seen both panic selling and panic buying.

Led by an 8.5 percent drop in China's Shanghai composite index, U.S. and global stock markets took a dive Monday. Shortly after opening, the Dow Jones index fell by more than 1,000 points, or 5 percent. The Dow then zigzagged to close at 15,871, losing about 3.6 percent of its value.

The Ethan Allen furniture company is under pressure from one of its investors to either sell itself or divest some of its real estate assets. Sandell Asset Management, which owns 5.5 percent of Ethan Allen, said the company's stock is underperforming. 

Michael Raphael / FEMA

The state's unemployment rate has fallen to 5.4 percent, according to the Department of Labor. The department's Bureau of Labor Statistics said Thursday the state added 4,100 jobs in July.

Sage Ross / Creative Commons

The Department of Justice will extend its anti-trust review of Aetna’s proposed merger with Humana for another 30 days. The Hartford based health insurer just announced it's re-filing its notification with the department to allow for the month-long extension. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

CT Transit buses throughout the state will soon be equipped with GPS devices, providing real-time bus location information to riders via smartphone.

A group of hackers, who calls itself the Impact Team, purportedly released a huge trove of data that appears to contain the account details of more than 30 million users of a website that helps married people cheat on their spouses.

Chion Wolf/ / WNPR

Last month brought big news from major health insurers in the United States.

In early July, Aetna announced it will acquire Humana in a $37 billion deal. Just three weeks later, Anthem and Cigna announced their intention to merge in a $48 billion deal. This effectively reduces the big players in the health insurance market from five down to three.

Dirk Knight / Creative Commons

Earlier this summer, we spent a full hour listening to candidates for "song of the summer." Now that summer is winding down, we’re still trying to figure out the winner. Was there a song you just couldn’t get enough of recently? We talk to someone who says for the first time in a long time, there was no "Call Me Maybe," "Blurred Lines," or "California Gurls" (for better or worse).

Also, one popular retailer for music (and everything else) is under harsh criticism. The New York Times reported on the working conditions at "The Everything Store."

In the final segment, we address tall person guilt. Should they feel obligated to stand in back?

Morgan / Creative Commons

The high cost of infertility treatments for some people over 40 in Connecticut may soon covered by their insurance company.

The Department of Insurance has determined a 2006 state law mandating coverage for medically appropriate fertility treatments for men and women is discriminatory because it sets an age limit of 40.

Steven Depolo / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s annual sales tax-free shopping week begins on Sunday, but some shoppers might need to plan their purchases carefully to qualify. Only clothing and footwear items under $100 are eligible for tax-free purchase this year; in previous years, items could be up to $300.

Jason Tester Guerrilla / Creative Commons

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought against the ride-sharing service Uber by taxi and limousine companies in Connecticut. 

It's a Left-Handed Show

Aug 13, 2015
Andreas Levers / Creative Commons

Lefties have been scorned as evil, and celebrated as superior. But, like so many things in life, being a southpaw is not so easily defined. 

Börkur Sigurbjörnsson / Creative Commons

Today, our show about poo.

First, the 'no-poo' movement. Before the last century, people washed their hair a lot less often than we do today. A little Castille soap, an egg yoke for extra shine, and one hundred strokes with a boar bristle brush would do the trick. It wasn't until John Breck introduced his golden shampoo that everyone wanted to have the long lustrous locks of a Breck Girl. Today, 'no-poo' converts are going back to the basics and they say they're hair has never looked so good.

StockMonkeys.com on Flickr Creative Commons

A lawsuit against General Electric is being closely watched in boardrooms around America, as the company defends its decision to shut down its retiree health care plan.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

No one is saying that Connecticut is suffering from a housing crisis, but consider this: The state has far too few rental properties, which means those that exist cost more than many residents can afford.

Meanwhile, a giant portion of the state’s work force is at or near retirement, with expected drops in income.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Former Hartford insurance broker Earl O'Garro pleaded not guilty Tuesday to three charges in a new federal indictment, and it appears both sides are preparing for an October trial.

Phalinn Ool / Creative Commons

There are lots of tools to help us gauge the quality of nearly any product or service we wish to buy, from cars to computers to restaurants. Yet there's no easy way to assess the quality of the doctors who take care of what's most important to us -- our health. 

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