New Haven Region

Our New Haven Region coverage includes stories about all the towns in the Greater New Haven area, ranging from Southbury, Wolcott and Meriden to Milford, Branford and Madison.

Derek Torrellas / C-HIT

U.S. Army veteran Bob Swirsky’s face lit up when home health care nurse Jeanette Hutchinson entered his room to check his blood pressure and attend to his body to prevent bedsores.

City of New Haven

New Haven’s downtown streets are soon changing direction. Some streets that have been one-way for decades are now going to be two-way streets.

Michael Iamele / Soul de Cuba Café

American Airlines and Jet Blue have announced plans to offer scheduled flights to Cuba. This follows last week’s new agreement on commercial flights between the island nation and the United States. 

Neighbor Charged With Firing Shots at Meriden Mosque

Dec 18, 2015
Dave Zajac / Record-Journal

Federal authorities have charged a Meriden man with firing several shots into a local mosque in November.

Horia Varlan / Creative Commons

Here's a riddle for you: What's green and yellow, but most often red?

...Give up? It's a traffic light -- you know, those things you hit on your way into the office each morning. 

But how do they work? And why don't they ever seem to be synched up? 

This hour, we explore the science behind traffic light programming. We hear from engineers and experts in Connecticut and Utah. We also find out how new "smart" signals are improving traffic flow in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The state announced transportation improvements on Tuesday, including changes to Heroes Tunnel in New Haven. The state plans to dig a third tunnel to do necessary repair work so it doesn’t tie up traffic.

UTC

United Technologies said it wants to save $1.5 billion through closures and layoffs. But CEO Greg Hayes told The Hartford Courant that Connecticut is likely to be spared the worst of the cuts. 

Arasmus Photo / Creative Commons

Sanctuary cities have become a focus in the national debate on immigration reform. But what are they? Where are they? And how do they affect communities around the country? 

Clark flickr.com/photos/photos_by_clark / Creative Commons

For many, the satisfyingly "plucky" sound of the banjo immediately evokes bluegrass or country music. But the instrument is finding itself useful in lots of other musical genres. Coming up on Saturday night at Cafe Nine in New Haven, the banjo is going to get a workout during a concert called "Night of the Living Banjo."

Peter Morenus / University of Connecticut

The University of Connecticut is expanding its role in the New Haven Promise college scholarship program. The school said it will add a $5,000 supplement to students who attend UConn on the Promise scholarships beginning next fall. 

Sage Ross / flickr creative commons

In what will not be the final game played on a natural grass surface at Yale Bowl, Harvard beat Yale 38 to 19, clinching a share of the Ivy League football title on Saturday in West Haven.

Aliyya Swaby / New Haven Independent

A young Syrian family is now living in New Haven after Indiana officials objected to plans for the refugees to resettle in their state. Local officials scrambled to accommodate the family of three. 

Facebook

The civil war in Syria has claimed thousands of lives and led millions of Syrians to seek refuge in other countries, including the U.S. Federal officials said just 2,100 of them have been resettled in the U.S. so far.

In Connecticut, there's been a developing grassroots effort over the last several months to help Syrian refugees.

Dave Zajac / Record-Journal

Police and FBI agents are investigating reports of multiple gunshots fired at a Connecticut mosque hours after the terrorist attacks in Paris.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Yale University's president is announcing several changes in response to concerns expressed by students through demonstrations and meetings with university officials about the racial climate and diversity on campus.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It was a chilly November day on Yale’s New Haven campus. Bulky headphones covered my ears, and a recorder dangled from a strap around my neck, connected to a big fluffy microphone.

Heading toward me on a sidewalk were several pairs of female students in athletic gear. The first few women were white, but there was a black woman in the last pair. I wanted to ask her about the climate on Yale’s campus, but I stopped myself. I imagined her being offended that I didn’t stop to ask her light-skinned peers the same question.

JJ flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/ / Creative Commons

NAACP Chairman Roslyn Brock said law enforcement and African-American communities need to come together to talk about their concerns to help ease tensions, but lawmakers must also address aggressive policing nationwide.

Eleazar Castillo / thehandthatfeedsfilm.com

The Latino and Iberian Film Festival opened Wednesday at Yale University with scheduled screenings of about 50 movies.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The state of Connecticut is beginning to offer more ways for customers to receive real-time information about buses.

Riders of CTfastrak, the bus-only corridor between Hartford and New Britain, can obtain information about bus arrival and departure predictions, service disruptions and vehicle locations on Google Maps.

Wikimedia User: Wasted Time R / Creative Commons

A fraternity at Quinnipiac University has been shut down due to hazing allegations for the second time this semester.

Wikimedia / Creative Commons

A federal appeals court has sided with Yale University in a dispute over the ownership of a $200 million Vincent van Gogh painting.

Paul Bass / New Haven Independent

A Yale University initiative is helping to reduce gang violence in the Elm City. It's called focused deterrence, and the strategy is simple: focus resources, like social services and more police, on those most likely to be affected by gun violence. In New Haven's case, that was street gangs.

DavidsonScott15 / Creative Commons

A Connecticut state lawmaker has been arrested on a charge of driving under the influence after a crash on Interstate 84.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

   

A judge in 17th century Connecticut ruled on the thorniest of problems. Some of these included ruling on a piglet’s paternity, who was to blame for faulty shoes, and whether illicit sex had occurred on a boat sailing to Stamford. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Last March, Onyeka Obiocha of Happiness Lab at the Grove coffee shop in New Haven stepped outside to find his car had been towed.

When he finally got it back and was driving home to Hartford, the car blew a head gasket. The repair bill was prohibitive, so Obiocha said goodbye to owning a car.

Nate Gagnon / WNPR

More than two truckloads of contraband tobacco products and $120,000 have been seized by Connecticut tax officials, after a four-month investigation into illegal tobacco sales. 

Courtesy Atla DeChamplain

Atla and Matt DeChamplain, former high school sweethearts who have become one of Connecticut’s premier jazz power couples, debut their first album done together at a festive CD release concert on Friday, October 2, with shows at 7:00 and 9:00 pm at the Palace Theater Poli Club at 100 East Main Street in Waterbury.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

On September 30, 1865, Yale University played its first-ever baseball game, a Saturday afternoon matchup against Wesleyan. Last Saturday night, the two teams met in an exhibition game to celebrate the sesquicentennial of their rivalry, and of their respective baseball programs.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Sculpture gardens bring together art, human creativity, and nature. There are several in Connecticut, including a private one nestled in a residential neighborhood in North Haven that winds in and around the home of artist David Millen.

Ted Danforth

A judge in 17th century Connecticut ruled on the thorniest of problems. Some of these included ruling on a piglet’s paternity, who was to blame for faulty shoes, and whether illicit sex had occurred on a boat sailing to Stamford. 

While most of the rulings wouldn’t stand up in today’s court, our earliest settlers struggled to decide a fair price to pay under a harsh system. Connecticut Superior Court Judge Jon Blue shares some of the liveliest tales from our past, vividly described by court reporters not bound by modern day legalese.

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