WNPR

Mental Health

Many refugees who arrive on U.S. soil finally feel safe after decades of war or torture or loss of family members. But just because they're removed from physical harm, it doesn't mean the pain is over. 

Lori Mack/WNPR

Two Connecticut war veterans are supporting a bill that would provide access to mental health services for those receiving other-than-honorable discharges. They called on Congress to pass the Honor Our Commitment Act, a bill introduced by Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy and co-sponsored by Senator Richard Blumenthal and seven other senators.

Photo courtesy of Dr. Loren Olson

Coming out as gay can be difficult — even traumatizing — for young people. But what is coming out like for older men and women, some who were once married to heterosexual spouses and who have children?

This hour, we learn more from Dr. Loren Olson, author of Finally Out: Letting Go of Living Straight

Amy Elyse / Creative Commons

The movie "Split," by director M. Night Shyamalan, is the latest in a long line of movies that portray people with "split personalities" as either violent psychopaths or comic foils who exhibit dramatic changes in identity that don't reflect the subtle transitions that usually take between six and twelve years to properly diagnose.

Lindsay Kinkade / Creative Commons

Are tolls coming back to Connecticut? Yes, we’ve heard this before -- but the state Speaker of the House now says tolls are "inevitable."

This hour, we talk with Democratic State Representative Joe Aresimowicz and Republican leader, Senator Len Fasano about that and other budget decisions facing Connecticut lawmakers.

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