WNPR

Health Equity and Access Project

With our partner, the Connecticut Health Foundation, WNPR's Health Equity and Access Project strives to create awareness about Health Access and advance Health Equity among Connecticut residents, businesses, the educational community, the health care sector, community leaders, and policymakers.

As the only statewide public radio station, WNPR has the flexibility and resources to educate Connecticut residents about health disparities through in-depth reporting, hour-long programs, and community events. 

Find out more and register for Health Equity Project events here.

Visit the Connecticut Health Foundation at cthealth.org.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

A bipartisan group of legislators and advocates are urging passage of a bill that would allow all pregnant women in Connecticut access to insurance coverage for pre- and post-natal care.

Many refugees who arrive on U.S. soil finally feel safe after decades of war or torture or loss of family members. But just because they're removed from physical harm, it doesn't mean the pain is over. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

President Donald Trump’s budget proposal plans to zero out funding for something called Community Development Block Grants -- money that goes from the federal government to states and municipalities to use as they see fit.

Sumit Chachra / Creative Commons

Recent hate crimes against Indians living in the U.S. have — again — sparked debate within South Asian communities, recalling memories of similar attacks after 9/11.

This hour, we hear reaction from Indians living in Connecticut. What’s the best way to respond to incidents of hate?

Lori Mack / WNPR

The American Health Care Act, which is the House Republican bill to replace Obamacare, includes a provision that would defund Planned Parenthood. The organization serves around 70,000 residents in Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Confronting Youth Homelessness

Feb 6, 2017
Steve Hardy / Creative Commons

Year after year, hundreds of thousands of people find themselves homeless in the United States — including the young.

This hour, we explore local efforts to help homeless youth in Connecticut. What kinds of programs are out there to help them to not only find housing but employment, too?

Hartford has received a federal grant aimed at improving health outcomes for HIV/AIDS patients in the city.

For the past three years, Americares has run a free health clinic in Stamford, Connecticut, using a 40-foot converted school bus. On Wednesday, the nonprofit opened up a brick and mortar version of that clinic. Last year, the mobile clinic served 850 patients. The new permanent clinic is equipped to serve a lot more. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This year marks an important milestone in our nation's history -- 35 years since the discovery of HIV/AIDS. This hour, we look back to see how far we've come in understanding, treating, and destigmatizing HIV/AIDS in America. 

UW Health / Creative Commons

The state is looking for a transportation company to get low-income Medicaid patients to their medical appointments. This comes after legislators overrode a veto of a bill by Governor Dannel Malloy.

Women are less likely to die of breast cancer than they were a decade ago, but not all women are benefiting from that trend.

White women saw more of a drop in death rates than black women — 1.9 percent a year from 2010 to 2014, compared to a 1.5 percent decrease for black women, according to a report published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Philips Communications / Creative Commons

The legislature wants to save money on healthcare, and one issue has been whether it makes sense to penalize doctors who don’t keep costs down. 

Crtystal Emery

According to a 2015 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, black Americans make up less than six percent of the nation's physicians and surgeons. A new documentary shines a light on the topic, specifically focusing on women in the field.

Nancy Wong/Wikimedia Commons, The White House/Creative Commons / WNPR photo illustration

Drug epidemics are not new in the United States. But there’s something very distinctive about the demographics of this latest wave, which centers around opioid and heroin abuse. It cuts across socio-economic and racial divides. 

BrianAJackson/iStock / Thinkstock

Politics plays a role in all sorts of things in life: dating partners, how we think about the economy, and, according to Eitan Hersh, the choices doctors make.

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