Environmental Reporting Initiative

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Trees
8:38 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Connecticut State Task Force: Municipalities Should Do More Tree Maintenance and Care

Courtesy State Vegetation Management Task Force

A report on how to manage the trees alongside Connecticut's roads is expected to be released this week.

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Where We Live
10:25 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Paved Paradise

Picabu (Wikimedia Commons)

Picture a parking lot....what comes to mind? A sea of asphalt, white lines, birds pecking at discarded food. Don’t forget the stray shopping carts, bright lighting at night, and blinding glare by day. Not the most pleasant place.

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Where We Live
9:33 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Imagine Your Town Without Trees

Chion Wolf

After a series of bad storms, Governor Dannel Malloy declared a “War on Trees!” Or, at least, that’s what it seemed like at the time. The governor was reacting to the hundreds of thousands of power outages caused by downed trees after a tropical storm and a freakish October snowstorm.

In his defense of more aggressive tree-cutting he coined this signature phrase: “Trees grow, ladies and gentlemen of the state of Connecticut, they grow.”

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Where We Live
10:52 am
Thu December 8, 2011

Environmental Priorities

Where We Live
10:48 am
Wed October 19, 2011

Examining Environmental Regulations

thoth, creative commons

The EPA has been criticized for being both “regulators gone wild” and “regulators gone missing.”

The Environmental Protection Agency has been the target of legislation passed in recent weeks by the Republican-led House.  The bills aim to gut existing regulations - while forcing the agency to examine the economic impact of the work it does.  This movement the heart of a new book by Richard Trzupek about how many Republicans think the EPA kills jobs.

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Conservation
9:08 am
Thu May 26, 2011

These Islands Are For The Birds

Nancy Eve Cohen

Beginning this week, residents are being asked to stay off two Connecticut islands. Connecticut’s environmental agency wants to allow the birds to nest, undisturbed. The public will not be allowed on Duck Island in Westbrook or on Charles Island in Milford until the beginning of September.

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Invasive Species
2:18 pm
Thu May 19, 2011

On the Lookout for a Tree-Eating Invasive

takomabibelot, Flickr Creative Commons

The Emerald Ash Borer is an invasive insect from Asia that has killed more than 50 million ash trees in the U.S. in the past decade. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is setting more than 60,000 traps in 48 states, including Connecticut, to look for the beetle. 

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Contests
11:21 am
Tue May 17, 2011

A Million Dollar Fish

Nancy Eve Cohen

The state Department of Environmental Protection has partnered with the store, Cabela's, to sponsor a fishing contest. The agency’s goal is to encourage more people to fish.

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Environmental Protection
8:01 pm
Thu April 21, 2011

D.E.P. Commissioner Goes D.E.E.P.

Chion Wolf

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Flood Stage
11:15 am
Fri April 15, 2011

Minor Flooding Forecast On Connecticut River

Nancy Eve Cohen

The Connecticut River rose above flood stage in parts of Connecticut and Massachusetts today and is expected to continue to rise Thursday. But the forecast is for minor flooding. WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports.

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Environmental Protection
11:02 am
Fri April 15, 2011

Lecture Series Marks 40th Anniversary Of DEP

Chion Wolf

Forty years ago this month the state of Connecticut created the Department of Environmental Protection. The D.E.P. is marking the occasion by launching a lecture series. As WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports the goal is to stimulate thinking about the agency’s expanding role.

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New Haven
4:41 pm
Mon April 11, 2011

Human Traffic Signals

Uma Ramiah photo

For at least 20 minutes on Friday evening, no one ran a red light at the corner of Church and Chapel Streets downtown.

It may have been all those human red lights, on a mission.

“We’re here because we’ve noticed a problem in New Haven, where drivers run red lights pretty frequently,” said Juli Stupakevich (pictured), who organized a “Red Means Stop” protest at that intersection. “Red just doesn’t mean stop anymore.”

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Fish Populations
12:18 pm
Mon April 11, 2011

So Few Smelt

Flickr Creative Commons, John Loo

Migrating fish just a half-foot long once flooded coastal rivers of the northeast every spring. In recent decades, rainbow smelt populations have been declining every year, and are fading to a dim memory in many places. But not in Down East Maine. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, Murray Carpenter reports that elsewhere in the region, scientists are trying to bring them back.   

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Carbon Trade
12:59 pm
Fri April 8, 2011

Three Northeast States Debate Carbon Cap and Trade

Public Service of New Hampshire

The nation’s first carbon trade system, which started in the northeast, may be in trouble. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, is designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions ten percent by 2018. But now, three of the ten states in the initiative are considering withdrawing, in part, because of the cost to electric ratepayers. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, Amy Quinton with New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

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Recycling Waste
11:56 am
Fri April 8, 2011

Meeting On Mattresses

Violentz, Flickr Creative Commons

Government and businesses have figured out how to recycle a lot of things such as bottles and cans, old computers and even left-over paint. But how do you recycle something that’s big, bulky and may contain bed bugs? That’s the subject of the first national meeting on mattress recycling that will be held next Monday in Hartford. 

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Health Risks
11:11 am
Fri April 8, 2011

Learning About the Problem of PCBs

Nancy Eve Cohen

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is holding a series of workshops this week on the human health risks of PCBs in the Housatonic River and the different approaches to cleaning them up. WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports.

Before the mid-1970s, when polychlorinated biphenyls or PCBs were deemed toxic and banned by Congress, the chemical compound was commonly used in manufacturing. General Electric used PCBs when it made electrical transformers at its former plant on the Housatonic River in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

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Wildlife
8:32 am
Mon April 4, 2011

State Closes Trail to Protect Nesting Eagles

goingslo, Flickr Creative Commons

The state Department of Environmental Protection is closing down a hiking trail  for a few months in Windsor Locks to keep people away from a nesting pair of Bald eagles. 

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Wildlife
9:56 am
Thu March 31, 2011

Golden Eagle Helps Site Wind Turbines

Nancy Eve Cohen

It’s not that unusual to see Bald eagles in parts of the Northeast, but Golden eagles are rare here. In all there are only one to two thousand in eastern North America. As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations, WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports from a windswept hilltop in Connecticut where a rescued Golden eagle was released into the wild.

One day this winter, farmer Brian Hawks was snowmobiling in Amenia, NY, when he saw something on the side of the trail. It was a Golden eagle with an injured foot.

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Connecticut Legislature
10:45 am
Fri March 4, 2011

When Cash Register Receipts Cost Too Much

Chion Wolf

The Environment Committee is considering legislation that would ban the use of cash register receipts that contain the chemical, BPA. The bill would also require a research institute at UConn to develop a list of toxic chemicals. 

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Agriculture
8:40 am
Tue February 1, 2011

Bringing Farmers and Chefs to the Table

Nancy Eve Cohen

The Connecticut Department of Agriculture convened a meeting today to introduce farmers to chefs looking for local food. As WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports the agency held a kind of “speed dating” exercise to bring people together.

“30 seconds left! 30 seconds left!”

A clang of a cow-bell moves the participants from table to table. About two thirds are from restaurants, hospitals and food distributors. One third are harvesters and farmers, like Alysson Angelini from Jones Family Farms.

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Agriculture
8:06 am
Mon January 31, 2011

Winter Markets Help Northeast Farmers Survive

Nancy Eve Cohen

Farmers markets have seen huge growth in the past three decades. They give consumers access to local food, sometimes at a lower price. And farmers can sell without a middleman getting a cut.

Now, some markets now run through the entire winter. As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports the number of winter-long markets have doubled, tripled... even quadrupled in some states.

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Canada
11:02 am
Thu January 27, 2011

Hydro Quebec: 'Green' Enough for the Northeast?

John Dillon

Northeast states are increasingly looking to Canada to meet a growing demand for low cost hydro electricity from renewable sources. But the energy imports are stirring controversy. In northern New Hampshire, local activists are fighting a power line that would send the electricity south. And questions are being raised about whether big hydro is really green.

As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations John Dillon of Vermont Public Radio reports:

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