WNPR

Connecticut Garden Journal

Credit Nathan Boltseridge / Creative Commons

Connecticut Garden Journal is a weekly program hosted by horticulturalist Charlie Nardozzi. Each week, Charlie focuses on a topic relevant to both new and experienced gardeners, including pruning lilac bushes, growing blight-free tomatoes, groundcovers, sunflowers, bulbs, pests, and more. Learn more about Charlie at gardeningwithcharlie.com, or reach him at cnardozzi124@gmail.com.

Hear Connecticut Garden Journal on Thursday afternoons on WNPR at 3:04 pm. 

ThunderUPforever / Creative Commons

With winter here, it's nice to have some outdoor garden activities that result in beautiful flowers. One activity I like is forcing flowering branches of spring blooming trees and shrubs indoors. Not only do you get beautiful color weeks before the natural bloom time, you prune your plants too. 

Franco Folini / Creative Commons

This ancient vegetable hales from Southeast Asia. Laborers who built the pyramids in Egypt were paid with it. In Mexico a special night in December is dedicated to this veggie where they artistically carve the root. What vegetable is this? It's the radish. 

Sharon Dowdy / Creative Commons

Everyone loves flowering shrubs, such as lilacs and rhododendrons, but you may be wondering, how should I prune this thing? Pruning reduces the size and shape of your shrub, but you have to know when and how you do it.

Stanley Zimny / Creative Commons

As you drive around the state, you'll notice orchards are being pruned. You can start pruning apple trees anytime after the New Year, up until the flower buds start swelling. 

Alex "Skud" Bayley flickr.com/photos/alexsbayley / Creative Commons

Unless you have a greenhouse or hoop house, you're probably buying greens this time of year. It's good to support local growers, but you can grow nutritious greens right in your windowsill without an elaborate light system. 

Martin Fischer / Creative Commons

Last week, I highlighted award-winning vegetables that we can grow in our gardens this summer. Now, it's the flowers' turn. The All-America Winners selections include annual flowers that you'll be seeing in garden centers in spring.

Mark Buckawicki / Creative Commons

When it comes to new varieties of vegetables, small is better. As the average size of the typical home garden shrinks, plant breeders have been working to create varieties of our favorite veggies that fit in containers and small beds. 

Ciera Holzenthal flickr.com/photos/cierah / Creative Commons

I first came across tillandsia, or air plants, at a boutique garden center in San Francisco a few years ago. This trendy plant seemed like the answer to many people's dreams of a low-care house plant. 

Timo Newton-Syms / Creative Commons

Well, the leftovers still fill the refrigerator, there's still reams of wrapping paper to recycle, and there's the Christmas tree. If you purchased one of the more than 20 million live Christmas trees sold this year, you're probably wondering what to do with it now. 

Guilherme Cardoso flickr.com/photos/guiskatenator / Creative Commons

I recently returned from a trip to India, and while visiting a friend in his garden outside Delhi, I was struck by one brilliantly colored, red plant. This five-foot-tall and -wide plant looked familiar. Upon closer inspection, it was a poinsettia.

Mónica Pinheiro flickr.com/photos/monica_andre / Creative Commons

Oh by gosh by golly, it's time of gifts for your favorite gardener. I may not be much of a singer, but I know gifts a gardener in the family might like.

Tracey Adams flickr.com/photos/bikracer / Creative Commons

One of the simplest and most rewarding activities to bring in some holiday cheer this time of year is to make your own wreath. You can go to local garden centers and take a wreath-making workshop, or buy a pre-made wreath. But I like to construct my own wreath made from materials around my home. 

Ted Thompson flickr.com/photos/buffaloted / Creative Commons

I'm always fascinated with plant names. Take Christmas cactus, for example. It's not really a cactus, and can bloom from November until March. Yet it's this time of year when we see Christmas cactus everywhere. 

Mr. Nixter flickr.com/photos/stankus/15241691836 / Creative Commons

One of my favorite vegetables for Thanksgiving is the leek. Called the poor man's asparagus by the French, leeks originated around the Mediterranean, and have been eaten for more than 3,000 years. 

Kake flickr.com/photos/kake_pugh/6641536287 / Creative Commons

Gourmet mushrooms have become popular for cooking, and none more so than the shiitake mushroom. 

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