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youth

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

In July, more than 90 people were hospitalized -- many due to underage drinking -- after a Chance the Rapper concert in Hartford. Florida Georgia Line plays a show Friday night at Hartford’s Xfinity Center and because the demographics of those attending are similar, Hartford police will be stepping up their presence.

ep_jhu / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s Wheeler Clinic is piloting a new outreach program aimed at cutting the rate of opioid addiction among teenage girls. 

Jonathan B. Lauter / Flickr

It should be no surprise that video games have the potential to become addictive. But a spate of recent events has shown they can also be deadly: From young players dying of mid-game heart attacks to parents so immersed in their virtual environment that they forget to feed their children.

Cortney Novella / Courtesy New Zenith Theatre

A one-woman play opening Friday in downtown Waterbury takes a unique look at the complex, often hidden world of teenage relationships.

Juhan Sonin/flickr creative commons

The failure of lawmakers to pass a state budget is having a direct impact on summer jobs for Connecticut’s youth.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Oz Griebel has been at the helm of the MetroHartford Alliance — since 2001 — promoting economic development in the Greater Hartford region.

This hour, we sit down with Griebel — after his announcement he’ll step down from his role as President and CEO at the end of this year. We talk about the region, the state, and his hopes for the future.

Quinn Dombrowski / Creative Commons

LGBTQ advocates spoke out Wednesday in Hartford, calling for greater awareness of, and action against bullying and hate speech. This follows three recent youth suicides in the state.

Why can't kids today just work their way through college the way earlier generations did?

The answer to that question isn't psychology. It's math. A summer job just doesn't have the purchasing power it used to, especially when you compare it with the cost of college.

Let's take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university who's getting no help from Mom and Dad. In 1981-'82, the average full cost to attend was $2,870. That's for tuition, fees and room and board.

Shana Sureck

Social media can keep us from finding the space and time to really sit down and talk with one another. But there is one place where you can bet on a frank discussion – the barber shop.

This hour, we revisit our show on the role barber shops play in American communities – from the cities to the 'burbs.

Francois Schnell / Creative Commons

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), roughly one in five adults in the U.S. experiences a mental illness each year -- that’s approximately 20 percent of all American adults. But even as awareness increases, the stigma associated with mental illness persists.

Kevin Kuhl / CPBN

Mike Cowell tore his elbow ligament back when he pitched for Shelton High School. The pain isn’t sharp, he said, but it’s persistent.

But what caused it?  

Middlebury College

A recent Gallup poll of college students found that a majority of students think that colleges shouldn’t restrict speech on campus just because some political views are controversial or unpopular. But lately, disruptive protests of controversial speakers have again brought the issue of free speech front and center. 

Lori Mack/WNPR

Diversion programs offer first-time youth offenders an alternative to the traditional juvenile justice system -- sometimes called a pipeline to prison. For a little over a year in New Haven, a diversion program called Project Youth Court has taken shape. 

Shana Sureck

Social media can keep us from finding the space and time to really sit down and talk with one another. But there is one place where you can bet on a frank discussion – the barber shop.

This hour, we examine the role barber shops play in American communities – from the cities to the 'burbs.

It's tough to be a teenager. Hormones kick in, peer pressures escalate and academic expectations loom large. Kids become more aware of their environment in the teen years — down the block and online. The whole mix of changes can increase stress, anxiety and the risk of depression among all teens, research has long shown.

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