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This hour we'll talk Evan Osnos' in-depth look at the nationalist movement behind presidential candidate Donald Trump. How much power lies with the fringe? 

Saudi Arabia's new king is at the White House on Friday and Iran is expected to be high on the agenda. The Obama administration has been trying to reassure Gulf Arab allies that a nuclear deal with Iran doesn't mean that the U.S. will turn away from its other concerns about Iranian activities in the Middle East. To prove that, the U.S. is stepping up military sales to Saudi Arabia.

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Does it seem like there are a lot of bears in Connecticut? It's hard to have a conversation this summer without someone mentioning they spotted a bear. While most of us are in awe of the size and majesty of these animals, most of us don't know much about bears. In light of this weekend's closing of Sessions Woods, now might be a good time to talk about what's already on everyone's minds.

We have two big, sad stories concerning the rush of migrants trying to make it to Europe from conflict-torn countries in the Middle East and Africa: First, Austrian authorities said the number of people found dead in a food delivery truck, some of whom are believed to be refugees from Syria, has risen to 71.

As we reported, the people are thought to have suffocated. The truck was abandoned along Austria's A4 autobahn.

America and Iran have not had an easy relationship since 1979, when 52 Americans were held hostage for 444 days by students supporting the Iranian Revolution. The resulting rise of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini further weakened the relationship.

President Obama's campaign to win support for the nuclear deal with Iran got a forceful boost Sunday when Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada announced his endorsement. Reid, the Senate's top Democrat, says he will "do everything in [his] power" to make sure the deal stands.

Reid's backing adds even more weight to a groundswell of support building on Capitol Hill for the deal between the U.S., Iran and five other nations.

The saber rattling in the Korean Peninsula escalated Friday as the North threatened military action if South Korea does not stop blaring propaganda from speakers across the border by Saturday.

Reporting from Seoul, Haeryun Kang tells our Newscast unit that Pyongyang has put its frontline troops on a "semi-war state"

Haeryun reports:

As police searched for a man they believe is responsible for a blast that killed at least 20 people and injured 140 others on Monday, a second explosion hit Bangkok on Tuesday.

The second explosion was not deadly. According to the Bangkok Post, someone threw a pipe bomb off a bridge. The bomb hit a pillar and detonated, "sending up a large plume of water."

Two years after the United States deployed the Patriot missile defense system to Turkey, a NATO ally, the system will be withdrawn, the countries announced today.

In a joint statement, Turkey and the U.S. said that the air-defense units would be withdrawn in October, when the original two-year mandate expires. The statement reads, in part:

Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, who is in line to be Democratic leader when Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada steps down next year, says he will vote against the president's nuclear control deal with Iran.

In a post on Medium, Schumer says after "considerable soul-searching," he has decided he can't support the agreement.

Schumer says among his reservations about the deal is that it does not allow for inspections of Iranian nuclear facilities at any time. He adds:

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As President Barack Obama made his case for the Iran nuclear agreement at American University on Wednesday, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy took to the floor of his chamber to come out in favor of the controversial deal. 

U.S. State Department

Debate continued this week in Washington, D.C. over President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran.  

During a meeting with all 27 members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on Tuesday, Turkey said it wanted to give the members a heads up that at some point it may need their help fighting against the self-declared Islamic State.

Turkey called a rare Article 4 meeting of the NATO allies after it began an air campaign against ISIS targets in Syria.

President Obama, wrapping up his three-day visit to Kenya, urged the east African country to "choose the path to progress" by tackling corruption, eliminating income inequality and promoting gender equality.

"I'm here as president of a country that sees Kenya as an important partner. I'm here as a friend who wants Kenya to succeed," he said in a speech at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in Nairobi.

"You can choose the path to progress, but it requires making some important choices," he said in the 40-minute speech that was broadcast on Kenyan television.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Congressman Joe Courtney joins a classified bipartisan briefing today on the Iran nuclear deal. 

The U.S. and Cuba have restored diplomatic relations and reopened their embassies — but it's not yet open season for American tourists hoping to visit the island. The U.S. embargo on travel and business means you still have to have a valid reason to go — and that doesn't include sitting on the beach and drinking mojitos.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

All eyes are on Congress as lawmakers debate the Iran nuclear agreement. This hour, we speak with Connecticut's 2nd district Rep. Joe Courtney. He called the tentative deal a "hopeful development" when it was first announced.

Just after hosting Cuba's foreign minister at the State Department, Secretary of State John Kerry sat down with NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep to discuss the restoration of diplomatic relations with that country, as well as the status of a nuclear deal with Iran.

Kerry defended the Obama administration's stance on both countries, and said if diplomatic relations with Cuba or a nuclear deal with Iran were scuttled — either by a future president or Congress — it would hurt the U.S.

Chuck Kennedy / White House

President Barack Obama has more to say about the Iran nuclear deal.

Obama held a news conference on Wednesday to continue selling the agreement that he contends will cut off all the pathways Iran currently has to develop a nuclear weapon.

Is it a good deal?

President Obama and his detractors are headed for a ferocious debate on this question following the nuclear agreement announced Tuesday in Vienna between Iran and six world powers.

The United States and five world powers have reached a historic agreement with Iran over its nuclear program.

As we've reported, the deal puts restrictions on Iran's nuclear program and also sets up an inspections regime that aims to make sure Iran is meeting its obligations. In exchange, the U.S. and its European partners have agreed to drop tough sanctions, allowing Iran to sell more oil and rejoin international financial systems.

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As Greece seeks a new three-year bailout from other countries in the Eurozone, investors and businesses around the world -- including here in Connecticut -- are keeping an eye on the country's crumbling economy. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Former Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Dodd's name is being floated as a possible candidate to become the first U.S. ambassador to Cuba in more than half a century.

(This post was last updated at 8:44 a.m. ET.)

Just hours before a self-imposed deadline, Iran and six world powers said they would not extend a deadline but they would keep working toward a deal over Iran's nuclear program for the next few days.

Reporting from Vienna, where the talks are taking place, NPR's Peter Kenyon says both sides — Iran and the so-called P5+1, which consists of the U.K., China, France, Germany, Russia and the United States — are saying they will not be pressured into accepting a bad deal. Peter filed this report for our Newscast unit:

The U.S. team won the Women's World Cup soccer final 5-2 in a game that brought U.S. fans to their feet, reduced polished sportswriters to all-caps expressions of awe and rewrote FIFA records — and that was just in the first half.

The game began in spectacular fashion: In the first five minutes, captain Carli Lloyd scored two swift goals — the fastest two goals in FIFA history, according to the FIFA Women's World Cup Twitter account.

Just a few minutes later, Lauren Holiday brought the score up to 3-0.

President Obama on Wednesday announced the formal resumption of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba after more than half a century of hostilities. The two countries have agreed to reopen embassies in Washington and Havana.

Standing in the White House Rose Garden, Obama called it "a historic step forward in our efforts to normalize relations with the Cuban government and people."

Obama said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will visit Havana this summer to "proudly raise the flag over our embassy once more."

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

The International Monetary Fund confirms that Greece has officially missed a loan payment and is in arrears.

Just hours before Greece was due to make the payment of approximately $1.8 billion dollars, the Greek government asked for a new bailout from countries that use the euro currency.

I'd been renting a Toyota Camry to give free rides around the city for my series Streets of Shanghai, about the lives of ordinary Chinese. But the monthly rental fees were killing me, so I figured I could save money by buying a used car.

I went to a reputable used car dealership. The first hint that this would be different than shopping in the U.S. came when I met my salesman, a fresh college grad.

A report obtained by NPR paints a bleak portrait of Puerto Rico's economic future, saying its deficit is much larger than previously thought.

"Puerto Rico faces hard times," says the report which was commissioned by the Government Development Bank and written by three former and current International Monetary Fund economists. It is to be released on Monday.

The U.S. ambassador to France has been summoned to the French Foreign Ministry to answer new claims that the NSA monitored the communications of three sitting French presidents and their top staff.

Those said to be targeted include President Francois Hollande, who is holding an emergency meeting today with top French lawmakers.

From Paris, NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports:

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