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Connecticut's Office of Early Childhood is changing their eligibility rules for a child care subsidy program due in part to increased costs.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Workers in several low-wage industries in Hartford went on strike Tuesday, as part of a coordinated protest across the country. Fast-food, security, janitorial, homecare, and child care workers all took part in the day of action.

Sounds, particularly those made by other humans, rank as the No. 1 distraction in the workplace. According to workplace design expert Alan Hedge at Cornell, 74 percent of workers say they face "many" instances of disturbances and distractions from noise. "In general, if it's coming from another person, it's much more disturbing than when it's coming from a machine," he says, because, as social beings, humans are attuned to man-made sounds. He says overheard conversations, as well as high...

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Since March, several infants in Connecticut have died at home daycares – resulting in police investigations and heightened concern among parents. This hour, we talk about child care – many of us rely on it, how do we keep it safe?

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A new survey of state workers in Connecticut focuses on the experiences of state employees with disabilities.

If you've seen Sleeping Beauty, The Jungle Book or the Toy Story movies, you've seen the work of animator Floyd Norman; for decades, he has helped bring Disney and Pixar classics to life. Now 81, Norman still works for Disney, where he has plied his trade, on and off, since he became the studio's first African-American animator in the 1950s. Norman's love of art began long before his Disney job, as he reveals in a new documentary, An Animated Life. "Any empty surface was a blank canvas for me...

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Connecticut-based health insurer Aetna is calling off its public insurance exchange expansion plans for next year as it becomes the latest big insurer to cast doubt on the future of a key element of the Affordable Care Act.

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Work isn't what it used to be as organizations make a cultural shift. We can't count on jobs for life, and it can even be hard to tell what the rules are for making a living.

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Paid leave has been a hot-button issue on the campaign trail and in the Connecticut legislature. Earlier this year, state lawmakers considered a bill that would have established mandatory paid family and medical leave for private employees. That bill, however, died in the Senate.

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Thirty additional Connecticut state employees who work in executive branch agencies have received layoff notices since May 3.

As the population of people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder keeps growing, so does the number of people with that diagnosis who aren't finding employment. Though many young adults on the spectrum are considered high functioning , recent research shows 40 percent don't find work — a higher jobless rate than people with other developmental disabilities experience. Research scientist Anne Roux , of the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute in Philadelphia, studies young adults with autism and was...

Millions more American workers will soon be eligible for overtime pay under a rule being finalized Wednesday by the Labor Department. The rule says anyone who makes less than $47,476 per year must receive time-and-a-half pay for hours worked beyond 40 hours a week. That's roughly double the current threshold of $23,660. The measure is one of the most sweeping moves the Obama administration has made so far in its efforts to boost slow-growing incomes. But it's sure to face opposition from some...

Chion Wolf / WNPR

WNPR is launching a new series on the heroin epidemic gripping the state. This hour, we hear from one of the reporters leading the investigation. Also, the state's ongoing budget problems are causing problems for a lot more people than just number crunchers and policy wonks. We check in with two former state employees who lost their jobs in a recent round of layoffs.

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When Barbara Bradley Hagerty set out to write her new book Life Reimagined , her goal was simple: learn how to avoid a midlife crisis.

Mic445 / Creative Commons

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is an award-winning journalist and former NPR correspondent. She's also the author of Life Reimagined ​ , a new book aimed at helping readers navigate the trials and opportunities of midlife.

Tom Page / Creative Commons

Unions representing more than 36,000 Verizon landline phone and cable workers are threatening a strike starting Wednesday morning if the company doesn't agree to a new contract.

State lawmakers were down to the wire on meeting the state budget deadline, and voting was expected to go on beyond the midnight deadline, once all of the budget bills are finalized.

Mic445 / Creative Commons

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is an award-winning journalist and former NPR correspondent. She's also the author of Life Reimagined ​ , a new book aimed at helping readers navigate the trials and opportunities of midlife.

vivianejl / Creative Commons

Should the state of Connecticut become just the fourth in the nation to mandate paid family and medical leave for private employees? The question looks set to generate plenty of debate in Hartford this session, but the battle lines are more complicated than you might imagine.

Vermonthas become the fifth state in the nation to enact legislation that requires businesses to provide their workers with paid sick leave.

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To the list of things you can't avoid -- death and taxes -- we now add losing your job to a machine. A worry typically reserved for those in manufacturing, automation in the workplace is now a reality of nearly all occupations, and it's only getting worse... or is it ?

On Campus, Older Faculty Keep On Keepin' On

Oct 9, 2015

Ken Nickerson could have retired from his job as a professor of biological sciences at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln 10 years ago, when he turned 62. He could have retired five years ago, when the university offered faculty a year's salary to step down as part of a buyout to encourage more of them to leave. He could have retired last year, when, in yet another buyout offer, administrators dangled the equivalent of 90 percent of one full year's salary in front of faculty who would...

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Gone are the days of graduating from college, paying your dues with a few entry-level positions, and landing a 30-year career with a big corporation, complete with retirement benefits.

Seattle Municipal Archives / Flickr Creative Commons

A 1965 Senate subcommittee predicted that Americans would work 14-hour weeks by the year 2000. Needless to say, their prediction was a little off. Fifty years later, the five-day, 40-hour work week remains the standard here in the U.S.

Embracing Risk in Our Working Lives

Aug 13, 2015
Quinn Dombrowski/flickr creative commons

Gone are the days of graduating from college, paying your dues with a few entry-level positions, and landing a 30-year career with a big corporation, complete with retirement benefits.

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