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Chion Wolf / WNPR

They've gone years without a raise. Now, members of Connecticut's private group home workforce are calling for a boost in support from the state.

With a possible strike looming this April, we speak to Josh Kovner from the Hartford Courant for an update. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Catherine Smith is Commissioner of Connecticut's Department of Economic and Community Development. This hour, she stops by for an update on the state's economy and manufacturing workforce.

Later, we also check in with Goodwin College President Mark Scheinberg. How is his school training the next generation of manufacturing employees? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Catherine Smith is Commissioner of Connecticut's Department of Economic and Community Development. This hour, she stops by for an update on the state's economy and manufacturing workforce.

Later, we also check in with Goodwin College President Mark Scheinberg. How is his school training the next generation of manufacturing employees? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Electric Boat

Groton shipyard Electric Boat is looking to hire more than a thousand people this year. But the submarine maker is warning that the lack of a federal budget could eventually affect its outlook. 

A new NPR/Marist poll finds that 1 in 5 jobs in America is held by a worker under contract. Within a decade, contractors and freelancers could make up half of the American workforce. Workers across all industries and at all professional levels will be touched by the movement toward independent work — one without the constraints, or benefits, of full-time employment. Policymakers are just starting to talk about the implications.

Dan Taylr / flickr

Predictions of a paperless future go back to the 1800's. And since then, as technology has advanced, such predictions  have only increased. Today, despite a dizzying array of technological alternatives to paper, those prediction have not come true.

The long and growing list of high-profile men losing their jobs amid sexual-harassment allegations speaks to a big cultural sea change. But is that shift driven by generational differences in how sexual harassment is viewed, or by bigger changes in the workplace?

Seattle executive consultant Kim Arellano has taught classes on generational differences, and says sexual harassment makes for the liveliest discussions.

Thinkstock

A wave of sexual harassment scandals nationwide has prompted a re-examination of harassment training in the workplace.

National Hurricane Center

Millions sought refuge as Irma charged its way through Florida over the weekend. This hour, we get an update on the storm’s impact.

ACLU

A police officer has filed suit against the town of Cromwell, claiming her rights were violated when her employer refused to modify her job duties while she was pregnant. 

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

A new study demonstrates a key role immigrants fill in the American economy. The study, by the bipartisan research and advocacy group New American Economy, shows immigrants are more likely than U.S.-born workers to pick up night and weekend shifts in a number of fields.

Micromanagement is routinely the top complaint people have about their bosses, and in today's good job market where workers have more options, that's a bigger problem for employers.

People might have their own definition of when a manager crosses into being too controlling, but most people would probably agree that Marjon Bell's former boss would fit.

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

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