WNPR

wildlife

She was the alpha female of a wolf pack in Yellowstone National Park, sought after for photographs because of her unusual white coat.

Hikers found her suffering from severe wounds last month. The animal was euthanized by park staff shortly after.

The park now says the recognizable wolf suffered a gunshot wound, based on preliminary results of a necropsy by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The animal likely was shot sometime between April 10 at 1 a.m. and April 11 at 2 p.m. on the north side of the park, near Gardiner, Mont.

Jon Kalish / New England News Collaborative

There's a thriving scene on YouTube where woodworkers, metalworkers and other "makers" provide a step-by-step guide to their process.

In Waterford, Maine a maker named Gardner Waldeier -- who calls himself “Bus Huxley” -- has been entertaining viewers with equal portions of Yankee ingenuity and video wizardry.

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

Multiple coyote sightings in New London have put residents there on edge. They report coyotes following them on daytime walks with family pets and small children, showing no apparent fear of humans. 

In the northeast U.S., there is less than 1 percent of old growth forest left. A new University of Vermont study finds that harvesting trees in a way that mimics old growth forests not only restores critical habitat, but also stores a surprising amount of carbon.

Martin Svedén / Flickr Creative Commons

A tree’s roots touch more than just soil. They reach into the recesses of our past; into our culture and our traditions. It's something Fiona Stafford writes about in her new book The Long, Long Life of Trees. This hour, we sit down with the author. 

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