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wellness

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Watching her mother’s battle with diabetes fueled one Connecticut resident’s passion for health and fitness.

This hour, New Haven-based author and entrepreneur Mubarakah Ibrahim joins us.

We talk about her upcoming book, mR40 method, and learn about her unique journey as a wellness coach and Muslim-American. 

Vladimir Pustovit / Creative Commons

There are many questions a young woman will face as she matures. Among them: What is her timeline for building a family? And how many kids does she expect to have?

But not all women want to become mothers. 

Vladimir Pustovit / Creative Commons

There are many questions a young woman will face as she matures. Among them: What is her timeline for building a family? And how many kids does she expect to have?

But not all women want to become mothers. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Crews backed by Stamford-based Americares are among those responding to the unfolding storm disaster in Texas. Americares has deployed a response team to support its network of health centers and clinics in Texas, which are providing medical supplies and clean water to those displaced by catastrophic flooding around Houston, and the disastrous landfall of Hurricane Harvey near Corpus Christi. 

The American Cancer Society says Connecticut is one of two states that has not provided funding for tobacco prevention from money received from a 1990s settlement between the tobacco industry and 46 states.

When a receptionist hands out a form to fill out at a doctor's office, the questions are usually about medical issues: What's the visit for? Are you allergic to anything? Up to date on vaccines?

But some health organizations are now asking much more general questions: Do you have trouble paying your bills? Do you feel safe at home? Do you have enough to eat? Research shows these factors can be as important to health as exercise habits or whether you get enough sleep.

Some doctors even think someone's ZIP code is as important to their health as their genetic code.

Tony Bacewicz / C-HIT

The scandal around tainted water in Flint, Michigan put the issue of lead poisoning back in the spotlight. Yet lead-based paint remains one of the biggest sources of lead poisoning in the United States, including Connecticut.

On Friday it will be three years since Benjamin Sietz, a 15-month-old boy, died after he was left in a sweltering car for an extended period of time in Ridgefield, Connecticut.

EP_JHU / CREATIVE COMMONS

Connecticut lawmakers unanimously passed legislation that will take additional steps to address the state’s opioid crisis.

Kamaljith K V / Creative Commons

This hour: family narratives -- how we share the stories of our lives and how those stories help shape who we are. 

The Ethel Walker School

In a world of buzzing smartphones, endless meetings and persistent deadlines, how can we be more in-tune with ourselves and more creative in our endeavors?

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Thousands of Connecticut children have elevated levels of lead in their blood. This is often the result of lead dust in the home or in the soil outside.

The Ethel Walker School

In a world of buzzing smartphones, endless meetings and persistent deadlines, how can we be more in-tune with ourselves and more creative in our endeavors?

WNPR/David DesRoches


The desks in Sarah Lane’s fifth grade class at Bear Path School are covered with handmade paper hearts with short phrases written on them like, “Help Someone,” and “Compliment a Teacher.” 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new report gives voice to some of Connecticut's youngest domestic violence victims -- children six years old and younger. This hour, we take a look at the findings from that report and consider what’s being done to improve services for children who experience trauma. 

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