weather

As the region struggles to recover from Superstorm Sandy, the next hurricane season is less than a month away. Here in Connecticut officials have their eyes on several areas along the coast that are particularly vulnerable to the next storm. This is the first in a three-part series examining areas on the state's coastline that could be in trouble.

As the region continues to recover in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, environmental advocates are pushing for rebuilding in a smarter way to protect against future storms. As WNPR’s Neena Satija reports, they gathered last week in a summit to discuss the future of Long Island Sound.

As the region continues to recover in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, environmental advocates are pushing for rebuilding in a smarter way to protect against future storms. As WNPR’s Neena Satija reports, they gathered last week in a summit to discuss the future of Long Island Sound.

Sujata Srinivasan

Almost six months after Superstorm Sandy, some businesses are still fighting to get back on their feet. Pop’s Grocery, a 52-year-old corner store in Bridgeport, was inundated by floodwater during the storm. As part of her series on recovery after Sandy, WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan went back to visit.

Sujata Srinivasan

Almost six months after Superstorm Sandy, some businesses are still fighting to get back on their feet. Pop’s Grocery, a 52-year-old corner store in Bridgeport, was inundated by floodwater during the storm. As part of her series on recovery after Sandy, WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan went back to visit.

It’s been five months since Superstorm Sandy devastated the tri-state area. And now, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut are working on preparing for the next storm. Congress has allocated some money for that purpose, but very little of that will go to Connecticut.

It’s been five months since Superstorm Sandy devastated the tri-state area. And now, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut are working on preparing for the next storm. Congress has allocated some money for that purpose, but very little of that will go to Connecticut.

Alfred T. Palmer

Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication addressed a crowd that included U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal in a town hall-style meeting on climate change. The event was held on March 27 at Yale.

Leiserowitz spoke with WNPR's Ray Hardman.  

Harriet Jones

Connecticut’s small businesses took a hit from Hurricane Sandy last fall, but they fared better than their counterparts in New York and New Jersey. WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at a new study from insurer The Hartford.

 

Meteorological Spring Kicks Off With Snowstorm On The Way

Mar 15, 2013

Spring is weeks away. But as far as forecasters are concerned, winter is over. March kicked off meteorological spring and with it, a month of transition. 

Governor Dannel Malloy says the state's $115 million investment in the hedge fund Bridgewater was made to save jobs in the state.  But the incentive plan to move the company from Westport to Stamford has drawn criticism from groups that say the Connecticut is sidestepping state and local policies.  

As Connecticut’s coastal cities struggle to rebuild after Superstorm Sandy, it’s not clear how much money they’ll have to fortify themselves against future storms. For properties in flood plains that’s a particular concern. Residents of a public housing complex on Norwalk’s waterfront have been waiting for action for decades.

Dru Nadler

When the city threatened to tow all the cars on my street after the blizzard, I went into full-on panic mode. I paid a guy with a snow plow thirty bucks to dig out my car. And there was such a huge mound of snow between my roommate’s car and the road, that we actually drove it onto the sidewalk to get it off the street. And then the city never delivered. We live in the East Rock neighborhood of New Haven. We’re not alone.

Chion Wolf

The New York Times had the best description of the first term of Governor Dannel Malloy, “a wearying tape loop of natural chaos.”

The state is still digging out from yet another blizzard and he’s probably sick of the seeing the inside of the Emergency Operations Center and many students are probably sick of being stuck at home.

Putting Climate Change in the Transportation Budget

Feb 15, 2013

As the state continues to remove historic amounts of snow from roads, no one yet knows what the price tag will be. One thing is certain: It will have an impact on the state’s transportation budget.

Digging Out After The Storm

Feb 15, 2013
Neena Satija

After this weekend’s historic blizzard, it’s still slow going in much of New Haven County. Crews continue working day and night in New Haven to clear and widen the streets. Their main concern is figuring out what to do with all the snow.

 Rich Solomon’s been here since 6:45 this morning. He’s in downtown New Haven driving a Volvo dump truck to haul snow off the city streets. Right now his truck is empty, but it’s about to be filled by a payloader with 20 tons of snow. It’s a pretty quick process.

Water Shortages Come Home To Connecticut

Feb 13, 2013
U.S. Geological Survey, Virginia De Lima

As Connecticut continues to dig out from a historic blizzard, it’s clear that climate change is affecting where and when the state gets water. Environmental experts say that’s going to create problems for the state and the region down the line. Controversy over the University of Connecticut’s plans to get more water have already jumpstarted the conversation.

Shane Pope (Flickr Creative Commons)

In New Haven, as city workers and the National Guard work to clear the streets, a website has been organizing residents willing to chip in and help.

On the night of the blizzard, SeeClickFix.com's CEO Ben Berkowitz took a ride in an emergency vehicle with a New Haven city official and it became clear to him that this storm, in the short term, would cripple the Elm City.

On Facebook, I asked people what they learned during the storm.

 One person learned that Domino's will keep its pizza drivers on the road even after the highways are closed, a source of anxiety if your kid is one of those drivers.

 Another Facebooker said he gained insight about how hard life must have been for his family, a generation or so back in rural Quebec.

 A lot of people learned a lot of things about snowblowers, ranging from just wishing for one, to shrewd advice about how to start one under adverse conditions.

Heather Brandon

Last night, Governor Dannel Malloy briefed reporters as Connecticut continues to dig out from record amounts of snowfall. “Municipal officials and their employees are working very hard to clear the problems that exist," he said. "I know that people are impatient but I remind everyone that this is a record snowfall, the likes of which our state have never seen, or not seen since the 1880’s.”

Harriet Jones

Connecticut Light and Power says only around 140 homes remain without power after Friday’s storm. In all the utility has restored power to almost 70,000 homes, most of them in the Southeast of the state. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports from Stonington.

 

 

Sunday afternoon, a utility crew raises a bucket truck under wires running along Pequot Trail in Pawcatuck. According to CL&P’s Bill Quinlan, crews like these worked literally around the clock this weekend.

New Haven emerges from 34 inches of snow

Feb 11, 2013
Neena Satija

Reporting is tricky business while snowed-in. Follow along as Neena Satija attempts to leave her house and check on her car Sunday afternoon. She barely passes on both counts. 

Blizzard of 2013

Feb 10, 2013
Paul Pfeffer

The storm known as "Nemo," at least by the Weather Channel who named it, has now been recognized as having caused sufficient damage to Connecticut to warrant a Presidential declaration of a state of emergency.

Todd Binger/flickr creative commons

The Wave. Water waves. Not lazy surf lapping at your toes along the beach. Colossal, ship-swallowing rogue waves; scientists scrambling to understand the phenomenon; and extreme surfers seeking the ultimate challenge. Susan Casey’s account follows the exploits of boarders conquering suicidally large, 70- and 80-foot waves and the physicists trying to grapple with the destructive powers of 1,740-foot waves off the coast of Alaska and tsunamis in the Pacific. Casey is our guest.

WalkingGeek (Flickr Creative Commons)

New England is experiencing its first big winter storm of the season and while it is a mostly wintry mix for southern New England, it's dumping a lot of snow up north. That's a headache for commuters, but for ski areas, snow means skiers and snowboarders.

Joining us by phone is the owner of New Hartford, Connecticut's Ski Sundown Bob Switzgable. Switzgable said that while opening on December 26 is later than usual, it's not the first time it's happened.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

A new study takes a look at how climate change has impacted the northeast's hardwood forests. As WNPR's Ray Hardman reports, forests are threatened by a host of factors brought on by shorter winters.

The National Flood Insurance Program promises help for businesses and homeowners caught in devastating weather events like Sandy. But it’s a huge burden on taxpayers, and some critics argue that it encourages building in flood-prone areas. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports on how new rate increases for the program might affect its future.

Nearly 40% of small businesses that sustain severe flood damage in natural disasters subsequently close down. Pop’s Grocery on Main Street in Bridgeport is struggling to stay off that list.

Jan Ellen Spiegel

We’ve been thinking a lot about the damage Sandy inflicted on homes, communities, infrastructure. But it’s also been reshaping the coastline in places like Hammonasset beach, where a lot of sand and vegetation was cleaved away, leaving the dunes looking like cliffs. At Misquamicut beach in Rhode Island - a summertime destination for many Connecticut residents - four feet of sand was reportedly pushed into one beachside business.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/flickr creative commons

Call us with your best tips and tricks for hunkering down and battening all the hatches.

INTRO: A Nor’easter hit Connecticut today with snow, sleet, rain, and strong wind gusts. The state is still recovering from damage caused by hurricane Sandy. And as WNPR’s Neena Satija reports, some shoreline towns are concerned it will hamper their recovery efforts.

About 1200 people in the town of Greenwich still don’t have power after last week’s storm. This storm is expected to cause more problems for the region.

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