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Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Commissioner Rob Klee says the state will continue to receive EPA grant money for its two largest projects. The announcement comes after President Donald Trump’s administration ordered the EPA to freeze its grant spending last week.

The National Drought Mitigation Center / USDA / David Miskus NOAA/NWS/NCEP/CPC

The U.S. Drought Monitor said that more precipitation, combined with low temperatures and minimal evaporation, have increased soil moisture. But the agency is still classifying drought in portions of central and northwest Connecticut as "extreme."

Wikimedia Commons

An environmental advocacy group claims hundreds of thousands of gallons of sewage flowed into rivers and streams in the state over several years, and it's blaming the city of Danbury.

U.S. Geological Survey

Connecticut is one of 11 states with a very high prevalence of potentially corrosive groundwater, increasing the risk that water running out of the taps of homes with private wells might be tainted with lead, a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) found.

The Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline, granting a major victory to protesters who have been demonstrating for months.

The decision essentially halts the construction of the 1,172-mile oil pipeline just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of demonstrators from across the country had flocked to North Dakota in protest.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Plastic today is everywhere: in our bottles and cell phones, our grocery bags, and our trash. Some plastic garbage is so small, it's impossible to see with the naked eye: tiny microbeads, which have been banned from some products because of their environmental impact. WNPR met up with a group of scientists who are looking for them, in an effort to determine how many are in the water off Connecticut's coast.

Steve Johnson / Creative Commons

Connecticut is in a drought. But what does that mean for the state’s water resources? This hour, we follow up on the controversy surrounding Bloomfield’s new Niagara Bottling facility.

The California-based company will be allowed to bottle millions, if not billions, of gallons of public water -- something critics warn against due to recent climate trends. Coming up, we take a closer look. 

Mara Lavitt / WNPR

Six days to the election and there's certainly a lot to cover. Nationally, the Anthony Weiner investigation has possibly uncovered some more email trouble for Hillary Clinton; and Donald Trump is trying to win over African American voters by promising to be their "greatest champion"

Lori Mack / WNPR

Clean water advocate Christopher Swain stopped in New Haven during a 130-mile swim from Montauk to New York City.

grongar / Creative Commons

A settlement has been reached in a complaint filed against a Glastonbury, Connecticut metals-treatment company. The lawsuit, which was filed under the Clean Water Act, means Connecticut Galvanizing will have to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees and penalties.

The carcinogen often referred to as the "Erin Brockovich chemical" is present in about two-thirds of the drinking water across the country, according to water testing data from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Carl M / Creative Commons

Fall foliage season is right around the corner. But will the summer's lack of rain impact the colors we see on trees? 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

In the last couple years, millions of people across the country have learned their drinking water contains high levels of the contaminants known as perfluorochemicals. These are used to make non-stick products like Teflon and pizza boxes. 

When people hear the word drought, they likely think of California. But there's also an extreme drought in parts of New England. The Northeast is experiencing the worst drought in more than a decade.

Wikimedia Commons

A chemical spill in Southington has mobilized cleanup crews and resulted in a warning for nearby residents to avoid a section of the Quinnipiac River.

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