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Connecticut Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy sat side-by-side Tuesday with the woman who ran against each of them in hard-fought, sometimes bitter races, and recommended her heartily for a position in the Trump administration.

Updated at 9:00 a.m. ET

The Trump Administration spent its first full day in office taking shots at the media and arguing about crowd sizes at Friday's inauguration.

Press Secretary Sean Spicer delivered a fiery broadside against the Fourth Estate from the White House Briefing Room Saturday evening, claiming that reporters had engaged in "deliberately false reporting" in the past 24 hours since President Trump took the oath of office. And, after berating the press, he walked away without taking any questions.

Diane Orson / WNPR

Dozens of Democratic lawmakers nationwide said they would not attend Friday's presidential inauguration of Donald Trump. But Connecticut’s congressional delegation planned to be there, along with Governor Dannel Malloy -- and many Connecticut residents as they arrive to protest as part of Saturday's Women's March on Washington.

Tim Brown / Creative Commons

As Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States, NPR covered it live.

Much of the news about President Donald Trump's inaugural festivities has focused on the musicians who were invited to perform, and for various reasons -- mostly political -- declined the offer. But it's not unheard of for an artist of one political stripe to perform at the inauguration of a president from the opposing party. 

A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first."

Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage."

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

An inauguration protest in Washington, D.C., turned confrontational on Friday, as several hundred black-clad protesters broke windows and police responded with pepper spray and a concussive device.

The interim chief of the Metropolitan Police Department, Peter Newsham, said 217 protesters have been arrested, and 6 officers sustained minor injuries.

Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

The inauguration of Republican President-elect Donald Trump -- many will attend; some will boycott; will you be watching?

This hour, we preview the day's events with a team of reporters and political experts, and we want to hear from you. 

President-elect Donald Trump has been clear about issues important to him and his supporters: Build A Wall. Repeal and Replace Obamacare. Make Better Trade Deals. On other issues, large and small, Trump and his surrogates have been more ambiguous: Russia. Climate Change. 

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

How mental illness is treated across our nation could change under a new federal law.

This hour — the Mental Health Reform Act — what is it and what does it mean for mental health and substance abuse treatment in our state?

Ray Hardman / WNPR

With the Donald Trump transition team announcing new cabinet picks on a nearly daily basis, Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal wants to make sure those nominees disclose their tax returns. 

sam_greene@ymail.com / Creative Commons

Donald Trump will make an announcement on December 15 that he will leave his business "in total" to focus on the presidency. This will likely mean he is transferring management responsibilities to three of his five children: Ivanka, Donald Jr., and Eric. But a transfer may be nearly impossible, given the wide-ranging and deep entanglements Trump's children have in his business. 

Nancy Pelosi beat back her toughest challenge yet to her leadership of Democrats in the House of Representatives, defeating Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan to secure another term as House minority leader.

The California Democrat got 134 votes to Ryan's 63 in a secret ballot vote on Wednesday. Pelosi had boasted going into the vote that she had support from two-thirds of the caucus, and she received just over that amount.

jennie-o, creative commons

In his recent New Yorker commentary, Jelani Cobb writes about the defiance some states are feeling towards President-elect Trump and his policies. Democratic leaders in California and New York have released statements saying they'll protect their most vulnerable communities. 

FBI Director James Comey is facing criticism for turning the agency's attention to newly discovered emails that could be linked to Hillary Clinton, again focusing on the former secretary of state just days before Election Day.

Former prosecutors and former Department of Justice officials are questioning what Comey hopes to accomplish by announcing the investigation so close to the election.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It’s been two years since Connecticut's former State Veterans Affairs Commissioner Dr. Linda Schwartz was named Assistant Secretary for Policy and Planning at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In that role, her focus has expanded dramatically -- encompassing issues relevant to veterans and their families across all 50 states. 

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.

In President Obama's remarks at the dedication ceremony, he said this museum shines a light on stories that are often overlooked in the history books.

This post was updated at 3:10 PM

Russian hackers have been accessing the Democratic National Committee's computer network for the past year, and have stolen information including opposition research files on presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

According to CrowdStrike, the security firm the DNC called in to deal with the massive data breach, one group of hackers tied to the Russian government has been stealing information from the national party for about a year.

Washington, D.C., will be the next major city to implement a $15 minimum wage rate following a unanimous vote Tuesday by its city council.

In a victory for local and national labor unions, Washington joins the ranks of cities such as San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle in raising wages for primarily lower-income workers in restaurants, retail and other service industries.

The District's current hourly minimum wage is $10.50, and it was scheduled to go up to $11.50 next month under a law enacted in 2014.

Catie Talarski / WNPR

Two Connecticut Army veterans are in Washington D.C. on Wednesday as their all Puerto Rican unit, the 65th Infantry Regiment, known as the Borinqueneers, are awarded the Congressional Gold Medal -- the highest honor Congress can award to civilians. 

More than 50 world leaders are attending a nuclear security summit in Washington this week. But Vladimir Putin is a no-show. And, as if on cue, North Korea fired a ballistic missile on Friday.

These biannual nuclear summits, aimed at locking down fissile material worldwide that could be used for doomsday weapons, were proposed by President Obama back in 2009, barely two months into his presidency.

"We must insure that terrorists never acquire a nuclear weapon," he declared, calling such a scenario "the most immediate and extreme threat to global security."

After days of anticipation, a fuzzy wing flopped out of the remains of an egg shell Friday morning, signaling the hatching of a baby bald eagle who's been watched and fretted over, via an eagle cam set up at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C.

The bird then worked its way out of its shell over the next hour, emerging more fully around 8:20 a.m. ET. Throughout the process, its parent eagle alternated between peering attentively (to be honest, eagles don't seem capable of anything but) and nestling over the fledgling and a second, as-yet-unhatched, egg.

Starting at midnight Tuesday, the D.C. Metro rail system will shut down for 29 hours while authorities investigate potential dangers related to a cable fire on Monday, Metro's General Manager Paul Wiedefeld said at a news conference Tuesday.

Referring to trouble early Monday that caused delays on the Blue, Orange and Silver lines throughout the day, Wiedefeld said the incident showed "commonalities with the cable fire in [the] L'Enfant Plaza [station] a year ago." In that incident, a woman died after being trapped on a train filled with smoke.

Mourners gathered Saturday to pay their respects to deceased Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia at a funeral mass in Washington D.C.

The towering conservative jurist will be buried in a private ceremony following the service at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, NPR's Nina Totenberg reports to our Newscast unit.

"The shrine, a colorful and large church, is not far from where the justice served for some 30 years," Nina says.

The late Justice Antonin Scalia will lie in repose at the Supreme Court on Friday. The funeral will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C., according to sources close to the Scalia family.

In a tradition that dates back to 1873, Scalia's Supreme Court chair and bench were draped with black wool crepe today. The court has also placed a black drapery over the courtroom doors.

The last high court justice to lie in repose at the Supreme Court was Chief Justice William Rehnquist in 2005.

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