war

The Colin McEnroe Show
10:24 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Connecticut in the Civil War

Matt Warshauer is a professor of History at Central Connecticut State University
Chion Wolf

Here's a little bit of Civil War history that seems to have started here in Connecticut. It was in this month of February in 1860 that Cassius Clay, a Kentucky planter turned anti-slavery crusader spoke in Hartford not far from where we're doing this show today. He was accompanied by a torch-bearing honor guard in capes and caps. The Hartford Courant called these young men "wide-awakes." 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu January 23, 2014

A World of Conflict: Ukraine, Net Neutrality, and Local Man Rescued From Nazis

Protesters clash with police in Kiev last fall.
Credit Mstyslav Chernov / Creative Commons

Shortly after protests began in Ukraine, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy flew to Kiev and met with the anti-government demonstrators. 

"The protesters are down there because they’re sick of seeing a government that too often resorts to violence, that has become endemic with corruption and is moving toward Russia instead of towards the European Union," said Murphy. 

We hear more from Murphy about the recent, violent developments in the Kiev protests.

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History
3:39 am
Thu January 23, 2014

From The Trenches To The Web: British WWI Diaries Digitized

The British National Archives has digitized and posted online about 1.5 million pages of diaries from soldiers and units that fought in World War I. Here, a photo of the 12th (Prince of Wales') Lancers Group.
From a private collection, provided courtesy of the National Archives

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 2:37 pm

On the outskirts of London, in a basement room of the British National Archives, a historian delicately turns pages that have the brittle feel of dead leaves. Each is covered in text — some typewritten, some in spidery handwriting from a pen that scratched across the page 100 years ago.

"Saturday, the 26th of September, 1914," reads one. "The most ghastly day of my life. And yet one of my proudest, because my regiment did its job and held on against heavy odds."

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Holocaust
2:06 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Film Documents Children's Rescue From the Nazis -- and One Lives in Hartford

Ivan Backer, 84, a Hartford resident rescued by Sir Nicholas Winton during the Nazi takeover of Prague.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Next Monday marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Next week in Woodbridge and Madison, there will be two screenings of the film "Nicky’s Family," a Czech documentary that tells the nearly-forgotten story of Sir Nicholas Winton, a British stockbroker who organized the rescue of 669 children just before start of World War II. 

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Nutmeg History
1:39 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

Get To Know Connecticut's Colonial-Era Deputy Governors

Roger Ludlow and Chief Mahackemo are depicted in The Purchase of Norwalk.
Credit Harry Townsend / Works Progress Administration

Before the position of lieutenant governor existed, the Colony of Connecticut had what was then known as the "deputy governor." According to the Connecticut State Library, this position was established in 1639. There were 18 deputy governors, several of whom would alternate off between governor and deputy governor because of one-year term limits.

On a recent episode of Where We Live, we discussed the role of the lieutenant governor and why anyone would want that position. So this got us thinking about some of Connecticut's first #2's when the state was a colony.

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Reflecting on War
9:24 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Gates Says He Wept Each Evening Over Troops' Deaths

Robert Gates in June 2011 during his final official news conference as secretary of defense.
Jason Reed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 11:08 am

The news from former Defense Secretary Robert Gates' interviews with NPR and other news outlets — notably, how he uses a new book to criticize many in the White House — has now been widely reported.

But we also want to point to two passages in his conversation with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep that particularly struck us.

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Memoir of a Defense Secretary
7:35 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Gates: Obama Made Solid Decisions, But Was Swayed By Factious Staff

Robert Gates in June 2011, his last month as secretary of defense.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 11:07 am

Former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates says his criticism of President Obama is more nuanced than media reports about his new book, Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War, would have you believe.

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Coming Home Project
12:32 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Iraq War Veterans Reflect on Fallujah

Retired Lieutenant Colonel Michael Zacchea in Fallujah, 2004.
Courtesy of Michael Zacchea

It’s been two years since the U.S. military left Iraq. Some of the deadliest fighting was in the western cities of Fallujah and Ramadi, where more than 1,400 Americans died battling Al Qaeda insurgents. This week, news broke that Al Qaeda has taken control of the cities. 

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Coming Home Project
2:36 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Special Visa Program For Iraqis Extended

During the Christmas holiday, President Barack Obama signed a bill into law that has the potential to help more than 2,000 Iraqis. It extends the special immigrant visa program for Iraqis. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:27 am
Tue November 26, 2013

The Dark Side of Zen

Golden Palace Kinkaku-ji, Zen Buddhist Temple, Kyoto, Japan
Credit Carles Tomas Marti on Flickr Creative Commons

Here in the West, Zen Buddhism is often where you go when you've concluded the religion you grew up with is marred by venality, hypocrisy, misogyny, patriarchal structure, and an insufficient commitment to peace and love. 

Buddhism seems to have less hierarchy and more commitment to pure enlightenment and oneness. So, what do Buddhists do when Buddhism falls down on the job?

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History
5:20 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Battle Among the Clouds: the Chattanooga Campaign

Street view of Chattanooga. Photograph by an unknown photographer, ca. 1865. Like other photographs in this sequence, this one was evidently taken shortly after the war. The Connecticut Historical Society, 2013.225.2
Connecticut Historical Society

The words of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, memorializing the Civil War’s largest battle to date, were still echoing when Union and Confederate forces engaged in yet another large scale engagement in late November 1863. This time around the North’s rising military star, Ulysses S. Grant, commanded the Union forces.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:54 am
Wed November 13, 2013

A Tribute to the Proud and Peaceful Pigeon

Pigeons have been both reviled and revered for over 5,000 years
Credit zigazou76

B.F. Skinner thought pigeons were so smart they could be used to guide missiles during WWII. He proposed a system in which pigeons would essentially pilot the missile. Skinner said pigeons could be trained to peck at a screen to adjust the trajectory of a missile toward its target. Project pigeon was funded but never used. It's one of the many reasons I could talk about pigeons all day. 

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Veterans
2:38 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Families Seek Congressional Medal For All-Hispanic Unit

World War II veteran Luis Rodriguez, 91, is pictured with his daughters, Judy and Beth. (Lucy Nalpathanchil/WNPR)

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 9:44 am

The history of the U.S military includes contributions from segregated units. One unit many Americans know little about are the Borinqueneers. They were an all-Hispanic unit in the U.S Army that served in World Wars I and II. But it was the Korean War when the unit rose to prominence. As Lucy Nalpathanchil of WNPR reports, there’s a growing movement to honor these veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal.

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Veterans' Day
1:36 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Fairfield University Commemorates Veterans' Day With Creative Works

Lucy Nalpathanchil.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Four veterans will read from their creative writing Monday evening and participate in a panel discussion about the notion of "just war" and the therapeutic value of writing at Fairfield University. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil, a reporter who launched the Coming Home Project and hosts All Things Considered, will moderate the event, which is free, and open to the public, and starts at 6:00 pm in the lower level of Fairfield University's Barone Campus Center.

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Veterans' Day
1:01 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

On Remembering, and Forgetting: One Veteran Speaks

Joe Carvalko.
Credit Joe Carvalko

The following is a keynote address delivered by Joe Carvalko at the Milford Veterans' Day parade on Sunday, November 10 on the town green. Carvalko is an American author and lawyer born in Bridgeport. His recent novel is We Were Beautiful Once, Chapters from a Cold War. Carvalko is a veteran of the Air Force (’59-’64), 307th Bomb Wing, Strategic Air Command, and is Adjunct Professor of Law at Quinnipiac University, School of Law. Learn more about  him at carvalko.com.

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Europe
5:18 am
Sat November 9, 2013

Bearing Witness To Nazis' Life-Shattering Kristallnacht

View of a destroyed Jewish shop in Berlin on Nov. 11, 1938, after the anti-Semitic violence of Kristallnacht. The pogrom unleashed Nazi-coordinated attacks on thousands of synagogues and Jewish businesses.
Keystone-France Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 2:26 pm

On a busy street in Berlin's shabby-chic district of Kreuzberg, the gray and dirty pavement glistens with little brass cobblestones. Millions of these stones are embedded in sidewalks all over Europe. They commemorate the last address the city's Jewish residents called home before the war.

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Where We Live
7:22 am
Thu October 10, 2013

One Life in Afghanistan and Another at Sea

Qais Akbar Omar and Roz Savage
Picador/Chion Wolf

This week marks the 12 year anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. But war in this country pre-dates the U.S.’s involvement. In his memoir A Fort of Nine Towers, Qais Akbar Omar recounts his life in Kabul, pre-9/11 when Afghanistan was engulfed in civil war and Taliban rule.  Qais recently stopped by our studios to talk about life in war-torn Afghanistan and some of the happier moments.

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Middle East
9:47 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Working Together For Peace in the Middle East, But Differences Remain

Adi Greenfield works with Combatants for Peace.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

At a time when a lot of attention is focused elsewhere, Israelis and Palestinians will join together for an interfaith march for peace in New Haven this weekend.

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Danbury
8:00 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Poets Protest Gun Violence at Rally

Dick Allen is Connecticut's Poet Laureate, and will headline Saturday's 100,000 Poets for Change: Rally Against Gun Violence at WCSU in Danbury
Credit State of Connecticut

On Saturday, 30 poets and other artists will gather at Western Connecticut State University for a day-long rally against gun violence. It is part of a larger international day of protests called 100,000 Poets for Change.

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Iraq
12:38 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

Bombings Kill Dozens Of Mourners At Baghdad Funeral

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 4:04 pm

In Baghdad's Sadr City, a bombing attack that struck during a funeral has killed dozens of people, with the death toll continuing to rise Saturday. Multiple reports are citing at least 65 deaths in the attack, one of several in Iraq today.

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Analysis
7:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Obama's Shift On Syria: A Show Of Strength Or Fear?

President Obama walks along the West Wing Colonnade toward the Oval Office ahead of Tuesday night's speech on Syria.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 11:00 am

One line President Obama might have borrowed for his speech to the nation Tuesday night was a famous one from John F. Kennedy's inauguration address: "Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate."

Always admired as a fine turn of phrase, what meaning does this have in our own time?

Perhaps it might have helped Obama make the turn from indicting the Syrian regime's alleged use of chemical weapons to explaining why he backed off his own earlier threat of military retaliation against Syria.

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Syria
10:19 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Obama's Toughest Audience: His Die-Hard Supporters

President Obama returns to the White House on Friday after the G-20 summit in Russia.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 12:37 pm

Brent Rosenberg was an early and enthusiastic Barack Obama supporter at a place and time when it mattered most: Iowa 2008, in the run-up to the first-in-the-nation presidential-nominating contest.

"I worked hard during the caucuses," said Rosenberg, a Des Moines lawyer and lifelong Democrat. "I led all my friends and relatives to him."

So it's with evident pain that he now speaks about the president, on the eve of Obama's speech on military action against Syria, with disappointment, if not regret.

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News
7:39 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Ordinary Americans React To Calls For Strikes On Syria

Soldiers rappel at the Sabalauski Air Assault School at Fort Campbell, Ky.
U.S. Army Jennifer Andersson AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 9:55 am

Before we hear from President Obama Tuesday night, let's hear now from some concerned citizens. The president will go on television to ask for support to press Syria to stop using chemical weapons.

Polls suggest Americans are largely opposed to military strikes in Syria. For a sampling of opinions we have reports from Pennsylvania, Los Angeles and Kentucky.

We begin at a place whose residents know a lot about overseas conflicts: Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Our report is from Blake Farmer of member station WPLN.

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World
10:17 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Congressional Delegates Weigh a Military Strike on Syria

Senator Richard Blumenthal
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

President Obama is winning some Republican support for military action against Syria. But judging by response from Connecticut's congressional delegation, he won't have an easy time with members of his own party.

"The authorization document that the President has submitted to Congress is insufficiently limited in defining our objectives and strategy," Senator Richard Blumenthal told WNPR's Where We Live. He said the authorization the President is asking congress for is far too broad in its scope, and he wants more information on the long-term objectives.

"Our national security has to be one of the predominant factors that we consider," he said.  

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News
10:33 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Syria Resolution Will Hit Mark, Obama Predicts

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 11:25 am

The White House is working with congressional leaders to shape a resolution that authorizes the type of military action that would send a "clear message" to President Bashar Assad and cripple the Syrian leader's "capability to use chemical weapons not just now but in the future," President Obama said Tuesday.

Sitting with leaders from both major parties, the president also said he is confident lawmakers are "going to be able to come up with something that hits that mark."

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War
10:35 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Limited U.S. Strikes ... Followed By Major Attacks On U.S.

A month after U.S. naval ships shelled Lebanon, Muslim extremists blew up the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut, killing 241 U.S. military personnel on Oct. 23, 1983. Over the past three decades, limited U.S. military strikes have been followed on several occasions by major attacks against U.S. targets.
Bill Foley AP

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 5:23 pm

As President Obama weighs a possible limited military strike against Syria, he may want to consider the track record of his predecessors on this front. It's not encouraging.

The Obama administration and several before it have seen limited attacks as a way to send a tough message without drawing the U.S. into a larger conflict.

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The Faith Middleton Show
2:05 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

The Long Walk and The Yellow Birds

Elliott Plack/flickr creative commons

Today we’ll talk to two veterans of the Iraq war. Brian Castner served three tours of duty in the Middle East, two of them as the commander of an Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit in Iraq. His book, The Long Walk, chronicles his ‘story of war and the life that follows.’ When veteran Kevin Powers returned from Iraq, he turned his experiences there into The Yellow Birds, a novel about two young privates trying to stay alive at war. Castner and Powers join us for the full hour.

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History
4:06 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

How Many of Those Brave Men Were Launched into Eternity

Private Loren Goodrich was at a camp in Western Maryland when he wrote home to family and friends.  He and his comrades in the 14th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry had just been in a major battle in the small Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg. That battle was fought 150 years ago, from July 1-3, 1863. The 14th was one of five infantry regiments from Connecticut to take part. Of the 1300 Nutmeggers at Gettysburg, sixty-nine were killed and 291 were wounded, captured or missing.

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The Faith Middleton Show
1:12 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Authors of Agent Garbo and The Pursuit of the Nazi Mind

John Goode/flickr creative commons

Agent Garbo: The Brilliant, Eccentric Secret Agent Who Tricked Hitler and Saved D-Day
by Stephen Talty

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Veterans
6:24 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

The Borinqueneers: an All Puerto-Rican Unit in the U.S. Army

Photo by Catie Talarski

There'a a push among federal legislators to award a Congressional Gold Medal to the last segregated Hispanic unit in the U.S. military. 

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