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visual art

Just over 200 years after Jesus died, in 240 A.D., someone made a wall-painting of a woman in a house in the ancient city of Dura Europos, now in modern Syria.

Almost seventeen centuries later, in the 1920s, Yale archeologists found the painting while excavating Dura. 

Yale University Art Gallery

Yale University Art Gallery is celebrating the centennial of the art movement known as Dada with a series of events, a major exhibition, and a Dada Ball.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, Kristina Newman-Scott sits down with us for the first time since becoming Connecticut's director of culture in 2015. We find out how things are going in her new position, and take your questions about local arts and culture. 

Mohamad Hafez / The Harts Gallery

Think of them like magic portals: tiny architectural models transporting you directly onto Syria's streets and forcing you to look at the bombed-out buildings and homes hit by the worst of that country's civil war.

Brian Owens

During the day, 24-year-old Brian Owens is a design engineer at a local Connecticut contracting firm. After hours, he creates art.

A rare collection of photos of the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama are now on display at the Providence Public Library.

On Wednesday the photographer, Steven Somerstein, will deliver a talk about his experience taking the photos, witnessing the march, and interacting with influential black leaders of the time including, Martin Luther King Jr, James Baldwin, and Rosa Parks.

Danielle Mailer

From brilliantly colored fish to dancing cats to sensual silhouettes of the female form, the art of Connecticut’s Danielle Mailer spans painting, sculpture – and now – large public art projects.

Wikimedia / Creative Commons

A federal appeals court has sided with Yale University in a dispute over the ownership of a $200 million Vincent van Gogh painting.

The company that makes Legos has landed at the center of a social-media firestorm after Chinese artist Ai Weiwei complained that it refused to supply a bulk order of the toy bricks for his art.

Ai said he wanted to use the bricks for an exhibition on free speech at Australia's National Gallery of Victoria. The museum attempted to place an order but was told by the company that it "cannot approve the use of Legos for political works."

"We've been refused, and the reason is Lego will not support political art, which is very frustrating," Ai said in an interview with NPR.

When you think of daily life in the developing world, what do you see?

Do you see the fierceness of a buffalo race in the jungles of Bali? Children climbing up a clay minaret in Burkina Faso? Families laid out like jewels across rooftops in India, searching for a respite in the summer heat?

The Dutch have landed in Boston with the Museum of Fine Arts’ new major exhibition of 75 masterpieces, titled “Class Distinctions: Dutch Painting in the Age of Rembrandt and Vermeer.” Twenty-four of the works have never been displayed in the U.S. before — including a little-known portrait of a lady that proved to be a critical get for the show’s curator.

Telling A Unique Story About 17th Century Dutch Society

Allen Phillips / Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

This weekend marks the grand re-opening of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford. 

Salvador Dalí / Beineke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Among the 176 items associated with Lewis Carroll's novel Alice's Adventure in Wonderland at Yale's Beineke Rare Book and Manuscript Library is a limited edition of the book signed and illustrated by Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dalí.

An exhibit at the Berkshire Museum is showcasing the work of a photojournalist whose collections of images from nearly 100 countries have been displayed in museums around the world, including at the Louvre in Paris. An opening reception is set for Friday at 5:30.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

In her graphic memoir Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, cartoonist Roz Chast brings humor to the difficult topic of aging parents. Last year, the book earned her the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize for nonfiction. Now, it's being featured alongside some of her other work as part of the Distinguished Illustrator Exhibition Series at the Norman Rockwell Museum. 

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