From west to east, the targets ranged from a U.S. consulate in Jeddah to the holy city of Medina and a mosque in the city of Qatif. So far, at least, the casualties are relatively light when compared to recent similar attacks. In at least one case, the attacker died before reaching their target.

Information about the attacks is still emerging, and some early reports may prove off-base. We'll move quickly to correct the record and we'll only point to the best information we have at the time. Refresh this page for the latest.

TASER International

Connecticut recently became the first state in the nation to require its police officers to file a report after using an electronic stun-gun or “Taser.” The first year of that data is now in -- and it says Tasers are used more frequently on minority suspects. 

At least 32 people have died at Istanbul's Ataturk International Airport, where an explosion followed an outburst of gunfire Tuesday night, according to Turkish media. Police and emergency personnel have flocked to the airport. More than 80 people were reportedly injured.

Crucial details about the attack are still emerging: We'll update this post with news from Istanbul as it emerges.


Singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge responded to the mass shooting at a Florida nightclub by doing one thing she felt she could do, which was write a song. Her debut performance of it in Torrington went viral on Facebook and was shared over 25,000 times. 

A Baltimore court has acquitted Officer Caesar Goodson of second-degree murder and all other charges in a case related to the death of Freddie Gray.

Gray, a 25-year-old black man, died from a spinal cord injury sustained while in police custody last year.

Goodson drove the van that transported Gray after his arrest. Gray apparently sustained the fatal injury during that van ride, during which he was handcuffed, shackled and not wearing a seat belt. The incident sparked protests and riots in Baltimore and raised questions about police negligence.

U.S. Department of State

Human trafficking is a global problem. But it's not something that just happens overseas. Minors are exploited throughout the United States, even in Connecticut. In recent years, the state and federal governments have passed legislation to increase penalties for people who use children as commodities whether for sex or labor. State agencies like the Department of Children and Families have partnered with anti-trafficking organizations to help victims become survivors.

Demanding action on gun control, about 30 Democratic members of the United States House of Representatives are staging a sit-in.

"Lawmakers are grouped in the well of the chamber, in front of the speaker's dais and in chairs in the front row," NPR's Sue Davis reports. "Some members are literally sitting on the floor of the House."

More than 50 U.S. State Department officials have signed an internal memo calling for a change in the way the United States approaches Syria — specifically, advocating military pressure on Bashar Assad's regime to push him toward the negotiating table.

The diplomats expressed their opposition to the current U.S. policy through a cable on the State Department's dissent channel — which exists for just that reason.

But NPR's Michele Kelemen reports that it's unusual for so many officials to sign on to such a cable.

"If there was ever a moment for all of us to reflect and reaffirm our most basic beliefs that everybody counts and everybody has dignity, now's the time," President Obama said in remarks during a visit to Orlando, Fla., to express his support for the victims of Sunday's deadly attack and their families.

As NPR's Scott Horsley tells our Newscast unit, "The president hopes his presence in Orlando will provide some support to the families of the 49 people who died in Sunday's massacre, as well as the dozens of people who are still recovering from the wounds they suffered."

Chion Wolf / WNPR file photo

I swear we almost never pick the Nose panelists based on the topics we plan to discuss. (We barely ever even plan in the first place, to be honest.) I asked Mr. Dankosky -- former Vice President of News for WNPR, current Executive Editor of the New England News Collaborative -- weeks ago to make his Nose debut this Friday.

Jo Cox, a member of the British parliament, has died after being shot in a village near Leeds.

The 41-year-old Labour politician was attacked earlier Thursday in the village of Birstall, within the region she represents, and later died of her injuries.

The BBC reports that Cox was both stabbed and shot in the attack. The broadcaster says a man has been arrested and police are not looking for any other suspects.

A second person, a man, was also injured in the attack and is expected to survive, The Associated Press reports, citing West Yorkshire Police.

Pete Souza / White House

In nearly eight years as President of the United States, Barack Obama has delivered more than a dozen responses to mass shootings. The attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida has re-ignited passionate debate on guns, the fight against ISIS, and LGBT discrimination. Several members of Connecticut's congressional delegation have called the legislative branch "complicit" in these repeated acts of violence and criticized colleagues for inaction on gun control. 

Updated at 8:55 p.m. ET.

He called it yapping, loose talk, and sloppiness. President Obama dismissed criticism of his administration's avoidance of the term "radical Islam" and urged America to live up to its founding values Tuesday, speaking at length about inclusiveness and religious freedom.

A victim and his doctors described a "war zone" following the deadliest mass public shooting in modern United States history.

Dr. Chadwick Smith, a surgeon at the Orlando Regional Medical Center in Orlando, Fla.,, said that a little after 2 a.m. ET on Sunday, patients began arriving into the emergency room. It was quickly filled to capacity with people suffering with wounds to the extremities, the chest, the pelvis and the abdomen. Some had small wounds others had large-caliber wounds.

Vigils, marches and rallies were held across the country and the world on Monday evening to remember the victims of the deadly attack in Orlando, Fla.

Events were held in New York, Vermont, Florida, California, Alaska, Rhode Island, Colorado, Louisiana, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, New Mexico, Pennsylvania and in Washington, D.C. Another vigil is scheduled for Tuesday in Atlanta, Ga.

In New York, thousands gathered outside the Stonewall Inn, the site of a 1969 police raid that launched the modern gay rights movement.

When we tried to put the killing of 49 people at an Orlando nightclub on Sunday morning in context, we said and wrote that it was the "deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history."

It was a deadlier attack than the shooting at Virginia Tech, which left 33 people dead, including the shooter.

William Neuheisel/flickr creative commons

As coverage of the mass shooting in Orlando, Florida dominates the news, it becomes increasingly more difficult to shield children from these types of events. How much information is too much? 

Jeff Kern / Creative Commons

The country grapples with the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history after a massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida early Sunday morning left 50 people dead and wounded another 53. This tragedy brings together several big issues of the last few years: guns, gay rights, and terrorism.

US Embassy / Creative Commons

Orlando, Florida was the scene of a mass shooting Sunday that left 50 people dead and dozens more injured. We've heard the story before: a shooter walks into a crowded room with multiple weapons to kill large numbers of people in an astonishingly small amount of time.

With sorrow, anger and expressions of unity, the LGBT community across the world is mourning Sunday's deadly attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando. Meanwhile, security has been increased at LGBT landmarks and events in cities across America.

The attack — in which a gunman killed 50 people, making it the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history, and injured 53 — struck during Pride Month, which commemorates the Stonewall Riots of 1969 and the gay rights movement more broadly.

On Sunday morning, a gunman at the gay nightclub Pulse in Orlando, Fla., perpetrated the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. He killed 49 people and injured more than 50.

The city of Orlando has released the names of the identified victims, after notifying their next of kin.

1. Pulse Orlando nightclub in Orlando, Fla. (June 12, 2016)

Police say 29-year-old Omar Mateen opened fire at the club that calls itself the city's hottest gay bar. He took hostages, and after a three-hour standoff, police moved in. The gunman was killed, but not before perpetrating the deadliest mass shooting in recent United States history.

At least 49 people were killed, and more than 50 were wounded and taken to area hospitals. Mateen was killed during a firefight with police.

A gunman opened fire on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., early Sunday morning, killing at least 50 people in the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history before being shot dead by police.