travel

Frank Hurley

Years ago, I needed a book for a long plane ride home from Austin, Texas. My cousin threw me a tattered paperback. It looked mediocre at best: on the cover was an iceberg, a ship, and the word ENDURANCE in bold letters.

A short time and several chapters later, I would start what some would call an obsession with a man named Ernest Shackleton, and one of the most incredible adventure/survival stories ever. 

"I don't know why you're on Mars, but whatever the reason for going to Mars is, I'm glad you're there and I wish I was with you."

That was a part of astrophysicist Carl Sagan's message, recorded a few months before he died in 1996, to the future human inhabitants of Mars.

Some of the earliest science fiction imagined voyages to the Red Planet. We now have the space-faring technology, and getting humans to Mars actually seems within reach. It would certainly involve massive resources and a lot of danger, but some believe the rewards would be massive.

Matt @ PEK/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: There are last minute winter vacation getaways. You can find great hotel rooms in major cities. And locate cheap ski lift tickets.

Travel + Leisure magazine's Trip Doctor, Amy Farley, is a tipster to follow for cheap flights, seat changes, and the best online sources for all kinds of travel deals.

A helicopter has rescued all 52 passengers from a research ship that’s been trapped in Antarctic ice since Christmas Eve.

The group was stuck in the ice for 10 days, but imagine being stuck there for 15 months – with no communication with the outside world.

That’s what happened to Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton and his team in their attempt to make a land crossing of Antarctica in 1914.

Their ship got stuck in the ice, and they never reached their goal. But that journey is now remembered for Shackleton’s journey to rescue his crew.

Headlines such as this come along every few months:

"Delta To Honor Extremely Cheap Mistake Fares."

The news, says The Associated Press, is that:

(This story was updated at 8:30 p.m. ET)

Wind-whipped freezing rain were moving through large parts of the nation on Friday, with the major winter storm blamed for a traffic death in Dallas and the deaths of four people from hypothermia in California.

The Associated Press says "more than a thousand flights have been canceled, football and basketball games postponed and holiday celebrations including town tree lightings and parades curtailed."

Contando Estrelas/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired October 22, 2013.  

Save money. Avoid long lines. Get better seats.

Check out our best travel tips conversation with Amy Farley, Travel Doctor columnist for Travel + Leisure magazine.

NASA/Bill Ingalls

Rick Mastracchio completed his fourth successful trip into space yesterday. He launched aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket, and was carrying some special cargo -- geocaching tags from the Waterbury Police Activity League and the 2014 Winter Olympic torch.

Ben Schumin/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton  

Save money. Avoid long lines. Get better seats.

Check out our best travel tips conversation with Amy Farley, Travel Doctor columnist for Travel + Leisure magazine.

Stefan Westhoff / Wikimedia Commons

We're trying to gather up some Connecticut State Troubadours in our studio later this week, so it occurs to me to ask: Which is more ear-splittingly bad?

From Norvelt to Nowhere is a book that begins in the shadow of nuclear annihilation, during the Cuban missile crisis in 1962. The first few paragraphs also disclose that nine elderly women in the town of Norvelt are dead by poison.

Did we mention it's a kids' book, too?

Andy Neale, Flickr Creative Commons

Congress designated the New England Trail as a national scenic trial in 2009. The 215-mile trail winds through 39 communities in Connecticut and Massachusetts. The trail's website has launched a new interactive map. 

"Folks really like to start their hike at home," said Clare Cain, trail stewardship director for the Connecticut Forest & Park Association. 

Morning Edition Host Ray Hardman talks to Cain about the ways the trail has improved since 2009, dramatic views, and its artist-in-residence.

Horia Varlan/flickr creative commons

Horia Varlan/flickr creative commons

Getting There from Here

Jun 7, 2013

For many of today’s drivers, tools like Google Maps and GPS devices have made turn-by-turn directions a familiar—even essential—part of getting from point A to point B. But this isn’t a new idea and didn’t start in Silicon Valley. In the early days of the automobile, “route guides” included turn-by-turn directions compiled by amateur and professional “pathfinders.” In 1901, Charles Howard Gillette, a Hartford native, published the Official Automobile Blue Book.

Monday's Commute: Carmageddon Avoided

May 23, 2013

Metro-North railroad has announced it will restore full service to the New Haven line on Wednesday. While many commuters heeded pleas to avoid rush hour travel on Monday, some didn’t have a choice or decided to brave it anyway -- including me. 

CTVisit.com

The fortunes of the Connecticut Office of Tourism have turned around since 2009, when then-governor Jodi Rell infamously cut state funding for tourism marketing to just one dollar. Last year the state invested $15 million to promote the state's tourism industry.

The result was the Connecticut "Still Revolutionary" campaign and according to Randy Fiveash, Director of the Connectict Office of Tourism, "Still Revolutionary" has been a huge success.

Horia Varlan/flickr creative commons

Harriet Jones

A new study says Connecticut’s coastline is worth at least $7 billion to the state’s economy. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

 

Interstellar Travel

Jan 23, 2013
Temari 09, Flickr Creative Commons

When you think of all the things here on the ground that don't work right, the notion that we should consider traveling to other stars seems a little crazy.

Daniel Voyager, Creative Commons

Radio producer Aengus Anderson is on his third cross country trip, this time for a podcast called “The Conversation” - a collaborative project about the future interviewing a cross-section of America’s most creative thinkers. Anderson joins us to talk space colonization, transhumanism, neoprimitivism, and more. 

World Map from CIA World Factbook; Malloy photo from Chion Wolf

Today, Governor Dannel Malloy is in China - leading a delegation trying to drum up business between our state and increasingly powerful economic force. He’ll also be making an appearance at the World Economic Forum being held there.

The state has launched its new marketing campaign with the slogan – “Connecticut, Still Revolutionary.” The campaign is the result of a four-month project conducted by an outside consultancy.

The state will spend $27 million over two years marketing itself as a tourism destination – a far cry from the recent past, when Connecticut’s marketing budget was reduced to just one dollar. At a press conference to launch the new campaign, the state’s tourism director Randy Fiveash says surveys elsewhere in the country show that budget cut hurt Connecticut.

Inst. for Exploration & Inst. for Archaeological Oceanography

Dr. Robert Ballard is probably the world’s most famous explorer - in part because of his Titanic discovery - in part because of his tireless mission to uncover secrets of the deep.

Flickr Creative Commons, vlitvinov

While traveling earlier this week, I was thinking about how easy it is to research almost any aspect of an experience and get an online, nearly real-time appraisal of the restaurant, hotel, shuttle service, store or tourist attraction you're dealing with. Sites like Yelp and TripAdvisor take a lot of mystery out of life (which could be a bad thing) and put a lot of control in the hands of average consumers (which could be a good thing). 

Catie Talarski

Diane Orson has made a “beat” out of covering a fascinating story of intrigue and international relations that reads like a combination of Indiana Jones and an Aaron Sorkin drama. Yale and the nation of Peru have been in a dispute for years over artifacts...a dispute that is now finally resolved. She just got back from a trip to Peru on Monday.

© Ocean Exploration Trust

After discovering the shipwrecked Titanic in 1985, Dr. Robert Ballard could have retired and still gone down as one of the greatest explorers ever. More than 25 years later though, he’s still at it.

His latest expedition is underway and he’s monitoring its every move from his control room in Mystic Aquarium, his computer at home, and on his iPhone everywhere else.

It WAS A Wild Cat

Jul 26, 2011
Courtesy Conn. Dept. of Energy & Environmental Protection

Connecticut’s environmental officials announced today that the Mountain Lion that was killed on the Wilbur Cross Parkway in June was a wild animal that traveled hundreds of miles from South Dakota to Connecticut. It is the first confirmation of a wild Mountain Lion in the state in more than 100 years. WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports.

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