trauma

The Colin McEnroe Show
2:58 pm
Thu November 6, 2014

Go Ahead And Talk To Yourself. You're Not Crazy!

A man talking to himself. Photo from www.mybrainsolutions.com.

Do you talk to yourself? Is it a silent inter-narrative or do you talk aloud? What form of address to you use to yourself?

When I'm mad at myself I sometimes address myself as Colin. But, I sense that when LeBron speaks to himself as LeBron, it's more affirming. 

I talk aloud quite a bit. A hangover, I think, from growing up as an only child.

The Spanish and Argentine novelist Andres Neumann has a new work, "Talking to Ourselves," in which he explores the solitary inner narrative that each of us conducts either silently, aloud, or writing a diary. 

Read more
Mental Health
9:20 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Marathon Bombing Study Makes Link Between Brain and Trauma

Boylston Street in Boston on April 24, 2013, nine days after the Boston Marathon bombing.
Rebecca Hildreth Creative Commons

When the Boston Marathon bombing occurred, neuroscientists at Harvard University were midway through a study on trauma and the adolescent brain. As a result, they said they were able to make some new scientific links between PTSD and media exposure.

Last April, Professor Katie McLaughlin and her colleagues at Harvard were studying the brains of young people who’d been through serious adversity. They had recruited about 150 children and teens. Half had reported early trauma or stress, and half had not.

Read more
One Year Later
4:08 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

A Year After Bombings, Some Say 'Boston Strong' Has Gone Overboard

The phrase Boston Strong sprang up after last year's marathon bombings and is now ubiquitous around town. But some wonder if the commercialization of the slogan also trivializes the tragedy.
Tovia Smith NPR

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:12 pm

The phrase Boston Strong emerged almost immediately after last year's marathon bombings as an unofficial motto of a city responding to tragedy. But now some are wondering whether the slogan is being overused.

The words are everywhere: Boston Strong is plastered on cars, cut into the grass at Fenway, tattooed on arms, bedazzled on sweatshirts and printed on T-shirts (and everything else).

Read more
Newtown: One Year Later
5:29 am
Fri December 13, 2013

What's It Like to Live in Newtown?

Sophfronia Scott with her son, Tain, now a fourth grader at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
Credit Sophfronia Scott

Sandy Hook resident Sophfronia Scott never asked to have these conversations, but since the shooting that left 20 students and six educators dead, they follow her. Like when she tells a person from out of town that she's from Sandy Hook.

"There's that stunned silence, and they say, 'Oh. Oh, those poor people. And how are you doing?'" said Scott. "I will tell them right away, because I know they want to ask, and if anything, I know they are afraid to ask. So I will say to them, 'Yes, I'm from Sandy Hook. Yes, my son attends the school. Yes, he was in the building.'"

Read more
Newtown: One Year Later
9:00 am
Thu December 12, 2013

Recovering from Trauma: Therapists Reflect on Their Work in Newtown

From left, Valerie Gillies, Dr. Karen Alter-Reid, and Michael Crouch, therapists with the Trauma Recovery Network of Fairfield County.
Credit Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

The discussion after last year's Newtown shootings was dominated by two topics: gun control and mental health. Many people focused on possible illnesses of the shooter, but there’s another side to the mental health discussion. In the aftermath of a tragedy, communities need help healing.

Read more
Child Health
9:34 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Sandy Hook Mother Talks About Trauma in Children

The mother of a child killed in the Newtown school shootings spoke to staff at Connecticut Children's Medical Center Tuesday morning. Nelba Marquez-Greene was a featured speaker during a lecture on child traumatic stress and PTSD.

Read more
The Faith Middleton Show
11:21 am
Tue December 3, 2013

The Trauma of Everyday Life

Credit shaire productions/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: I'm featuring New York psychiatrist Dr. Mark Epstein's fascinating new book, The Trauma of Everyday Life, because it explains the big pay-off for learning to notice the small and big traumas we all experience daily in an unpredictable world. By comprehending these traumas, he says, we permit their release, which leads to less stress and a greater sense of feeling fully alive. Dr. Epstein is a Harvard trained psychiatrist with a private practice in New York City. He's interested in the interface of psychotherapy and Buddhist philosophy.

Read more
Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu November 28, 2013

Organ Donation: Providing Life After Death

Caitlyn Bernabucci, LifeChoice Donor Services
Chion Wolf WNPR

Every day, around 80 people receive organ transplants in the U.S. But an average of 18 people die daily due to a shortage of much-needed organs, like kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs, even corneas.

One body donor can impact the lives of more than 50 people.

This hour, a conversation on organ donation and transplantation. Do you have personal experience with organ donation? Are you a donor or recipient? Why did you choose to be a donor? 

Read more
Where We Live
7:03 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Organ Donation: Providing Life After Death

Caitlyn Bernabucci, LifeChoice Donor Services
Chion Wolf WNPR

Every day, around 80 people receive organ transplants in the U.S. But an average of 18 people die daily due to a shortage of much-needed organs, like kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs, even corneas.

One body donor can impact the lives of more than 50 people.

This hour, a conversation on organ donation and transplantation. Do you have personal experience with organ donation? Are you a donor or recipient? Why did you choose to be a donor? 

GUESTS: 

Read more
The Faith Middleton Show
3:01 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Recognizing Everyday Traumas Leads to Happier Lives

Credit Aislinn Ritchie/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

I'm featuring New York psychiatrist Dr. Mark Epstein's fascinating new book, The Trauma of Everyday Life, because it explains the big pay-off for learning to notice the small and big traumas we all experience daily in an unpredictable world. By comprehending these traumas, he says, we permit their release, which leads to less stress and a greater sense of feeling fully alive. Dr. Epstein is a Harvard trained psychiatrist with a private practice in New York City. He's interested in the interface of psychotherapy and Buddhist philosophy.

Read more
Youth Health
7:49 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Mental Health Team Hits The Road To Help Youth In Crisis

Tony Bacewicz/C-HIT

Ten-year-old Joey Smith shared a celebratory high-five with Heather Kunkel, a mental health professional who was visiting the boy’s Thomaston home. “Things are great, spectacular even,” he said, as the two chatted at the kitchen table.

It’s a dramatic turnaround for Joey who met Kunkel when she was summoned to Thomaston Center School because he had threatened to harm himself. Now Joey, who has autism, is back at school with a modified curriculum to suit his individual needs and his parents have access to an educational advocate and community resources.

Read more
Where We Live
3:04 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Sexual Assault in the Military

creative commons

Pressure is building on the military to change its culture from within after an alarming Pentagon report estimates 26,000 servicemembers were sexually assaulted last year-- President Obama calls these crimes “shameful and disgraceful.”  Another layer to this problem is that very few of these assaults are actually reported. Now federal lawmakers including Connecticut’s Senator Richard Blumenthal are supporting bills to change how the military prosecutes these cases so victims no longer fear retaliation

Read more
Where We Live
10:54 am
Mon April 29, 2013

Covering Trauma

Chion Wolf

The mass murder in Newtown Connecticut raised many questions about how the media covers traumatic events, and how those same events may traumatize the reporters who cover them.

In early April, before the Boston Marathon bombings, host John Dankosky brought together a conversation with journalists who’ve covered violence at Central Connecticut State University.

Bruce Shapiro, executive director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma was our keynote speaker.  His center specializes in helping reporters do this kind of work.

Read more
News
5:54 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Waterbury Takes Part in Pilot to Combat Traumatic Stress in Kids

Photo courtesy of Flickr CC by Adkp

Waterbury police are collaborating with mental health professionals in a pilot program that aims to reduce traumatic stress in children.  The program is meant to provide support to children after the arrest of a parent or caregiver.

Read more
Where we Live
1:40 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Treating Trauma Before It Hurts

Kortunov on Flickr Creative Commons

After Newtown, school nurses and teachers have been asking for training to identify the early signs of trauma in children. The Child Health and Development Institute held two training sessions last week for school personnel in Connecticut with several more planned in the following weeks. 

Joining us this morning is Dr. Robert Franks, a trauma expert and Vice-President of The Child Health and Development Institute.

Read more
Aerospace
11:05 am
Tue August 2, 2011

CT Company Enters Cranial Implant Market

Harriet Jones

A tiny Connecticut company that’s making innovative skull implants for trauma victims has just shipped its first product.  Kelyniam says its rapid-response device is different than anything else on the market. As WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, the company is employing skills and techniques usually associated with the aerospace industry.

In the lobby of Kelyniam Global’s small unit in a Canton business park several plastic skulls sit on glass shelves. The company’s CEO is James Ketner.

Read more
Where We Live
12:01 pm
Wed June 22, 2011

Journalists In Conflict

Creative Commons

As we get ready to consider an end to the war in Afghanistan, it's not just soldiers who've paid the price in American wars.

American society is just beginning to seriously consider the emotional trauma of fighting war. But what about reporting it?  The deaths of two photojournalists in Libya this year sparked fresh conversation about the emotional and psychological — and not just physical — health of reporters and photographers who cover conflict.

Read more
Where We Live
10:23 am
Tue May 31, 2011

Memorials

karu101, Creative Commons

Connecticut is host to hundreds of war memorials and monuments dating back all the way back to the Civil War. These memorials are usually very literal - depictions of heroic figures or commemorations of the war dead. Or they are truly monumental: points of civic pride meant to be gathering places for the community. But over time, memorials have grown increasingly conceptual and abstract, and are often a touchstone for controversy.

Read more