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transportation

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

There's a shell of an old Pontiac car dealership at a corner of West Hartford’s industrial district that to the public eye -- and perhaps the public’s ire -- is littered with trash and weeds, with four lanes of fast traffic rushing by.

The head of the beleaguered Transportation Security Administration told lawmakers on Capitol Hill Wednesday the long passenger lines at screening checkpoints at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport this month should have been avoided. He also said it was a "failure" on the part of the agency to get some things done.

Travel forecasters are predicting busy highways this Memorial Day weekend. AAA expects more than 38 million people to travel over the holiday, the highest volume in a decade.

Long Island residents are getting their first chance to see the details of the plan to build a third track between Floral Park and Hicksville on the Long Island Rail Road as the MTA held its first of six public meetings on Tuesday.

Updated at 7 a.m. Tuesday

The head of security for the Transportation Security Administration, Kelly Hoggan, has been removed from his position after a hearing about the agency's management, the House Oversight Committee says.

On Tuesday, Secretary for Homeland Security Jeh Johnson confirmed on NPR's Morning Edition that Hoggan is being removed from his post.

The electric car company Tesla has convinced a handful of prime states, including Massachusetts and New York, to exempt it from laws that require car companies to sell through dealerships.

One year after an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia, killing 8 passengers and injuring scores of others, a key question remains unanswered: Why was the train going so fast?

Updated at 3 p.m. ET.

Out in the Nevada desert today, the world got a good look at the first public test of the Hyperloop — a concept that could someday become a new mode of transportation.

Don't call it a Wright Brothers' "Kitty Hawk" moment just yet, though. The demo focused on only one piece of a very complicated system.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx was in Burlington this afternoon to discuss a $10 million federal grant Vermont will receive to improve the rail corridor between Burlington and Rutland. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The streets of New Haven sport a colorful slate of cyclists, from college students getting to class, to city residents opting to bike to work over public transit. 

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson says he's "acutely aware" of longer wait times at airports, and now he's boosting staffing at checkpoints, hoping to avoid even longer wait times that had been projected for this summer.

The move comes after officials predicted "long waits in epic lines," as NPR's Marilyn Geewax reported in March.

A last-minute offer by electric carmaker Tesla Motors to open a regional distribution center in Connecticut may not be enough to persuade lawmakers to pass a bill allowing the company to sell its vehicles directly to consumers.

Uber drivers will stay independent contractors, not employees, in California and Massachusetts, just as the ride-booking company had maintained they were. Uber is settling class action lawsuits by drivers in the two states for a maximum of $100 million.

In a statement, the company says it will pay the plaintiffs $84 million, plus another $16 million if Uber goes public and within a year increases in value by one and a half times over its worth in December.

J. Stephen Conn / Creative Commons

Remember Hartford's Six Pillars? Gov. John Rowland’s plan to revitalize Hartford -- begun almost 20 years ago -- included a convention center and sports megaplex, a downtown higher education center, up to 1,000 housing units, Civic Center renovations, expanded downtown parking, and riverfront improvements. 

A German train dispatcher was playing a game on his cellphone shortly before he misdirected two trains, causing a head-on collision that killed 11 people, according to prosecutors.

The dispatcher may face charges of negligent homicide, according to Reuters and The Associated Press — though he insists he was not distracted by the game.

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